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Nominative Cases of a Noun: Subject of a Predication

33. What is a subject of the predication?
A subject of the predication is an objective compliment that comes after a passive verb and takes the place of the actor that has been erased. For example: قُتِلَ اللّصُّ (The thief was killed.)

34. What should be done if the verb is transitive and takes on more than one objective compliment?
If the verb is transitive and takes on more than one objective compliment, the first objective compliment is put into the nominative case as the subject of the predication and the second objective compliment remains in the accusative case. For example: رُزِقَ الفقیرُ مالاٌ (The poor man was given money.)

35. Does the verb remain in the same form if the subject of the predication is feminine?
If the subject of the predication is feminine the verb is made feminine:
• in the preterite tense by adding a vowel-less tā' to the end of the verb, for example:

سُرِقَت ساعةٌ (A watch was stolen.)
• in the aorist tense by adding a feminine letter to the beginning of the verb, for example:

تُغرَسُ الشَّجرةُ (The tree was planted.)

36. Does the verb change if the subject of the predication is a noun in the dual form?
The dual letters are not added to the verb if the subject of the predicate is a clear noun in the dual form, rather it remains single. For example: ضُرِبَ اللّصانِ (The two thieves were hit.)

37. Does the verb change if the subject of the predication is a noun in the plural form?
The plural letters are not added to the verb if the subject of the predicate is a clear noun in the plural form, rather it remains single. For example: سُمِعَ الشَّهودُ (The witnesses were heard.)

38. What is a sentence comprised of a verb and a subject of the predication called?
A sentence that is comprised of a verb and a subject of the predicate is called a verbal sentence. For example: زُرِعَ الحبُّ (The grains were planted.)

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