Zaid Alsalami

Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from ANU, Canberra. He has written and translated several Islamic texts and also prepared educational videos on Islamic rulings and practices.

100406

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As long as he is a male, and a non-mahram, a woman must observe outer and inner hijab in his presence. 

She cannot remove her veil in front of gay men. 

As for lesbian women, she does not need to wear hijab in front of them, as long as she knows there is no haram entailed, like lustful gazes. In the case that there is, it is best for her to cover up. 

And Allah knows best. 

100472

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

In our jurisprudence, semen of any sort is najis, and therefore it cannot be consumed, and it is haram to do so. 

In this case, if she has done so intentionally, then she must repent to Allah ta'ala. If it was not intentional, then there is nothing for her to do.

In both cases, her prayers and other acts of worship are valid and accepted, as long as they are done in the correct and valid way. 

And Allah knows best. 

100500

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The discharge a woman experiences is tahir, even if it is due to lustful thoughts, as long as it was not an orgasm. 

She does not need to do ghusl, or anything else. 

And Allah knows best.

100539

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

It is indeed very sad and also scary that in this day and age we still have such things happening. 

Her family cannot in anyway for her to accept to get married with someone she does not want to marry. In my opinion this abusive, cruel and evil. 

From a shar'i perspective, the marriage is batil and has no validity. 

And Allah knows best. 

100549

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Numerous reverts I have interacted with did face similar issues, where they feared backlash, and had to conceal their Islam. They would pray in secret, and so on. 

In answering your question, in your circumstances, your prayer will indeed be valid.

What I would like to recommend is that you correspond with other fellow reverts from your same background, and find feasable ways in how you are able to overcome some of the struggles and difficulties you might be facing. 

May the Almighty give you strength, and bless you for your accomplishments.  

100555

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As long as the infant child you are currently breastfeeding has not reached the age of weaning, then there is no shar'i problem in continuing to breastfeed the baby.

Of course, you should consult your doctor and ask if continuing to breastfeed while pregnant will make you weak, or bring about any other problems. 

And Allah knows best.

100619

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If we were to take each by its correct definition, we will be able to see a difference here. 

Western countries are generally democratic and secular. That means the political party is chosen by majority of votes, and secular is that religion has no involvement in the affairs of the government or laws. 

Well, that's what it is assumed to be. 

So, one can follow any religion, and the way they dress is not dictated onto them by government or law.

An Islamic country is different. It functions within what is mandated by religion. There is the public sphere, and the private. In the public, whether you are religious or not, you must observe the law of the religious state. In the private, you can do as you wish, if you are not religious or follow another religion. 

So, after this very brief definition, according to the Western system of government and secular law, banning someone from wearing a religious garb is certainly against the very foundation of what they claim they have, which is freedom of expression of what to wear and which religion to follow, under secular rule. 

You can condemn them based on what they are claiming they uphold, and that is the sad situation of today's society, unfortunately.

With prayers for your success. 

 

100631

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, it is permissible for Muslim women to wear high heels, as long as it is not considered as zeenah that should be concealed, and does not attract lustful gazes of non-mahram men. 

And Allah knows best.

100638

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 23 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Assuming that your mother has passed, besides whether it is wajib for you or not, it would be the most noble and most loyal thing for you to do. Your mother might have forgotten, or unintentionally neglected, or gone through some difficulties, and did not perform her acts of worship. 

You, the loyal son, are able to compensate that and the reward and blessings will not only go to her, but to you as well. In some hadiths it says there are some children who are loyal to their parents while alive, and not loyal when they die. Being not loyal is not doing dua or prayers or good deeds for them. 

If you cannot roughly estimate, or have no idea, you have two options:

1. Pray what you can, as long as you are healthy and have time. The bonus is it's extra 'ibadah for you, which is a wonderful thing. 

2. You can hire someone to do the 'ibadaat on behalf of your mother. There are many poor mu'mineen/mu'minaat who live off doing 'ibaadaat hire. Pay for whatever you are financially capable of. 

With prayers for your success. 

99823

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, a paternal and maternal uncle / aunt is considered mahram. 

And Allah knows best.

99884

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala 

If it is natural marble, and has not been laminated by plastic or anything else, then it would be permissible to do sajdah on.

And Allah knows best.

99841

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 weeks ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As you know, for us Muslims, prayer takes priority over absolutely everything. We plan our lives and our daily routine around prayer. We select our form of lifestyle and work based on how we can excel in our faith and get closer to God. 

Prayer, which is the most effective way to do this, must of course be done in its perfect form, and within its allocated time. 

Anything that becomes an obstacle for that, we must eliminate, even if it means loss of money or changing of work opportunity. 

In any job description, you are able to see if you can meet their requirements and also your religious requirements. If they do not give you any breaks, even toilet breaks, then in today's world that would be illegal and inhumane. 

I am sure you are able to find a few minutes, during your break, to perform your prayers, quickly, and get back to work. 

If under no circumstance are you able to take a break, or pray within the shar'i timeframe of the salat, then have trust in Allah ta'ala, who is the Razzaq, and pursue other work opportunities that would suit your Islamic values and human rights as well. 

With prayers for your success.