Zaid Alsalami

Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from ANU, Canberra. He has written and translated several Islamic texts and also prepared educational videos on Islamic rulings and practices.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

This is an expression mentioned towards the end of Ziyarat 'Ashura`, and wurūd here means entry, or returning back. The wurūd is entering into the sovereignty of God, and it could be positive and good, or negative and bad [as in Surah Hud, 98]. Yawm al-wurūd may not just be Judgment Day, but any stage after death, like entering the grave, barzakh, and resurrection. It is during these stages that we ask Allah ta'ala to grant us the shafa'ah of Imam Husain (a.s.). 

This is why in the Ziyarah, we say:

 اَللَّهُمَّ اُرْزُقْنِي شَفَاعَةَ اَلْحُسَيْنِ يَوْمَ اَلْوُرُودِ

We hope to be blessed with the intercession of Imam Husain (a.s.) at these very difficult times once we depart this world. Imam Husain (a.s.) is the Ark of Salvation, and it is for this reason that we seek his intercession. 

Of course, it is more probable that yawm al-wurūd is referring to Judgment Day alone, as such has been expressed in other narrations, like the following in reference to Imam Ali (a.s.) being in charge of supplying water (al-sāqī) on Judgment Day, as the Prophet (s.a.w.) had proclaimed:

 اَلسَّاقِيَ يَوْمَ اَلْوُرُودِ

In any case, this ziyarah is an important ziyarah that we should recite as much as possible, and hopefully be granted the intervention of Ahlul Bayt (a.s.) on Judgment Day, at the time we will need it most.

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As far as permissibility, yes, it is permissible. It could be said though that it might be makruh, due to it being an image. 

And Allah knows best.

114744

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Irrespective of what maddhab he may be, it is extremely important to recognise and affirm good qualities for your potential spouse, especially in being honest and truthful.

It is permissible for a Shi'i to marry a Sunni, as long as he/she is able to preserve their Shi'i identity and practice their Shi'i ways without pressure or backlash. 

If he is interested in the Shi'i madhhab, then that will be his choice, but he needs to make it clear to you as to why he is saying he is Shi'i, but, might be doing certain things the Sunni way.

Is it because he is in fear of his life, and therefore he needs to do taqiyah? Is it due to lack of understanding, and what slight differences there are between the Shi'i method of praying and the 4 Sunni methods? 

Or, is it him trying to please you and make your hear what you wish to hear only, which means he is not be honest to you? 

This is a conversation that needs to happen.   

With prayers for your success.  

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 weeks ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Nafaqah is wajib upon the husband, and any financial contribution the wife makes is solely out of her kindness and good will. She has no responsibility or duty added onto her towards the house, even if she is rich or earns more money. 

Yes, there would be a situation where she must contribute, and that is, for example, when she demands to live in a certain area or house that is more expensive, and she pledges to pay the additional amount. 

And Allah knows best. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 weeks ago

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If your husband lives in a different country, and you have given approval for that, and not objected, then this does not deprive the other wife from her right when you visit him. 

It would be good if the other wife forgoes her time during this period, and you have enough time to spend with your husband, but if she refuses, then she has that right. Unless, of course, such a condition was stipulated in your marriage contract, in which case the husband must abide by it. 

Whatever the situation may be, the main issue is whether or not it is good for you to be away from your husband for long periods of time, and when visiting him how much time you have with him. 

Nothing is more important than fairness and facilitating all the due rights of others.

With prayers for your success. 

113636

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As you are born into a Muslim family, you are indeed a Muslim, even though you have not practised prayer, or fasting or anything else. Your identity is Islam, and you believed in Almighty God and His Messenger.

By you repenting to Almighty God for your shortcomings, and turning to practicing Islam, your sins will be forgiven and indeed wiped away.

Of course, you will need to put extra effort in realising how important it is for you to practice your faith, and change certain things that you might have been accustomed to. You will soon see the fruits of faith and your spiritual side will excel. All this must be based on a good strong foundation, by educating yourself about the precepts of Islam. Study the fundamentals of your religion, and learn the best you can from reliable sources. This will further strengthen your faith and you will do things out of absolute conviction. 

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Although reciting a dua and praying for your husband would be a good thing to do, but it on its own will not eliminate the problem of alcoholism, him creating problems with those around him or his immaturity. 

You will need to seek intervention, by requesting his elders and even a therapist to instruct him on how to stop stop drinking and to improve his conduct. Such an individual should not be left to behave in this way, as it will certainly affect your marriage, and also your children as well, if you have children. 

His insecurities might be because he was spoiled from his childhood, or sees others as a threat to him, or whatever reason it may be. You must try to reassure him of his good qualities, and support him in what's challenging him, but you cannot do this all on your own. Speak to elders in the family, a professional counselor, and whoever else that can assist your husband in what he is going through.

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The most important thing a person must do in life is be very cautious about the circle of friends he/she has, and who they associate with. 

We need to be extremely picky and sensitive towards this. 

You need to advice your brother about the direction he is going, and how all this will affect his spirit and religious faith. Try to show him the bad effects of these people he is associating with, and how damaging something like an illegitimate relationship will be, and also alcohol. 

If your advice does not have any effect, try to ask someone he respects to intervene, inform your parents to calmly advice him, and just try your best to dissuade him. Seek advice from people around you as well, who know him.

Dua is also very important. Hopefully, he will come to his conscience and realise the wrong direction he is heading. Just never give up.

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

In Islam, masturbating is haram. If the woman is married, it is her husband's duty to satisfy his wife's sexual needs. It is very oppressive and selfish if he does not. We have numerous hadiths that mention this as well. 

If, for whatever reason, the husband is not fulfilling his duty and catering to her rights, it does not give her permission to do haram, and she must address this with her husband, or find other solutions.

And Allah knows best. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

No, sweat does not become najis in this case. 

A general principle is when one is in the state of janabah, it is imperitave to hasten in doing their ghusl. 

And Allah knows best.

112927

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, you would be permitted to work there, and the income is halal, and it does not concern you what they use it for, and how. Netflix is also not haram. It all depends on how it is used, and what is watched, by the individual.

And Allah knows best.