Zaid Alsalami

Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from ANU, Canberra. He has written and translated several Islamic texts and also prepared educational videos on Islamic rulings and practices.

105505

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 13 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Inner and outer modesty, chastity and hijab is something Almighty God has mandated for all men and women. 

It is necessary for us as Muslims to familiarise ourselves with the many benefits of inner and outer hijab, and the earlier we learn this the better. 

Young boys need to be modest, and so do young girls, even though they might not be intellectually mature enough. As long as they are aware of their surroundings, and have entered into the age of religious maturity, they become responsible and accountable for what they do. 

This is what bulugh and takleef means. 

Furthermore, being modest and having hijab does not necessarily mean one is sexually active. It is a process of engaging with the natural and mental development of a male/female. 

An Islamic lifestyle prepares us for the world, and whether this particular girl might be mentally ready or not, she must adapt to what it is that our religion wants from us, as the Almighty has accommodated to all that is required for us in our natural needs as humans. 

A young girl who reaches the age of taklif will realise how beneficial and positive hijab is when she prioritises her spiritual and moral conduct over everything else, and she will realise how intellectually mature she becomes. 

As for the age of bulugh, for a female it is completion of 9 lunar years. For a male, it is the occuring of one of the following, whichever one occurs first is the sign of his bulugh:

1. having a wet-dream.
2. growth of thick pubic hair. 
3. completing of 15 lunar years. 

And Allah knows best.

105425

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 13 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

This is all going to be circumstantial, because a female could be wearing a ring, and it could be attracting the gaze of the non-mahram, and it could not. 

The outer hijab of a woman is covering up herself, with the exemption of her face, and her hands up to her wrist. Everything else should be covered. 

If she is wearing any jewellery, and that jewellery is on top of her hijab clothing, or on her hand, like a ring, then it could be either halal to show, or haram. 

It would depend on whether the piece of jewellery is attracting the gaze of a non-mahram, or resulting in lustful looks, or solely considered as 'zeenah'. In this case it would be haram for her to reveal. 

If a woman is wearing a necklace on top of her hijab, or a brooch, a ring, a bracelet, etc, and it is not attracting the gaze of a non-mahram man, then she can wear it. 

A woman might not be intending it to bring notice of a non-mahram, but it would still be considered haram if it is bringing notice, as it would be considered as zeenah. 

And Allah knows best. 

105436

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 13 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The correct English pronunciation for رمضان is Ramadhan. Writing it with correct transliteration symbols is: Ramaḍān

Saying it as ramazan is incorrect. 

And Allah knows best. 

105440

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 13 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I will list only the daily nawafil:

Nafilatul-Layl:
Amount: 8 rak'ahs. 
Time: Before Fajr time.

Nafilatul-Fajr:
Amount: 2 rak'ahs.
Time: after fajr time, before salat al-fajr. 

Nafilatul-Dhuhr:
Amount: 8 rak'ahs.
Time: dhuhr time, before salat al-dhuhr. 

Nafilatul-'Asr:
Amount: 8 rak'ahs.
Time: after dhuhr, before salat al-'asr. 

Nafilatul-Maghreb:
Amount: 4 rak'ahs.
Time: after salat al-maghreb. 

Nafilatul 'Isha`:
Amount: 2 rak'ahs. 
Time: after salat al-'isha`, sitting down.

105441

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 13 hours ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Fasting starts from 'fajr', and ends at 'maghreb'. This means that you are able to eat, drink, etc, until just before fajr time. The issue whether you are able to accurately and precisely say when fajr time starts. 

This is why the best thing to do is to stop a few minutes prior to fajr time, refraining from any of the invalidators of fasting. By doing this, you will be sure that you have not done anything that invalidates your fast.  

As for how many minutes this should be, that is up to you, as long as you are trying to be as accurate as possible, and observing as much precaution as possible. 

And Allah knows best.

100273

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

You will not be able to do both wudhu' and ghusl simultaneously and at once. 

So, you can either do wudhu' before ghusl, or after ghusl. 

When you wipe your head during wudhu', you can use four fingers, or three fingers. Both cases are fine.

And Allah knows best.

104993

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Imam Ali (a.s.) had many children, up to 28, with various names that were common at that time. 

When someone hears that Imam Ali (a.s.) named some of his sons by the name of the first three caliphs, their initial reaction a Shi'i has is "How could he name them by the names of his enemies?"

But the big question here is who said that he named them in honour of the three caliphs? Did they have some monopoly over these names? 

Absolutely not. 

Do we not have some noble people during the time of the Prophet (s.a.w.) who had these names, like 'Uthman ibn Madh'un (r.a.), etc.  Especially when we have some narrations that Imam Ali (a.s.) had mentioned this. 

The same we can say about the name 'Umar. Maybe it was 'Amr, and not 'Umar, but even if it was 'Umar, the name itself is not a bad name. And there are numerous good people who had that name, like 'Umar ibn Abi Salamah. 

As for Abu Bakr, this is a kunyah, and it's not established that Imam Ali (a.s.) certainly named one of his sons by this name. 

If in this era, someone names their son Usamah, it does not mean they love Bin Laden, or if an Italian was to name their daughter Madonna (Medieval Italian name of Mary), then it does not mean they love the singer Madonna.

Maybe the Imam's wife and mother of that son had requested it, in honour of one of her family members. 

Here is a list of famous and noble companions who also had these names:

https://www.aqaed.com/faq/107/

You see, there are numerous ways of tackling this question. 

Unfortunately, some people use this argument as a way of  saying that Imam Ali (a.s.) had no issues with the first 3 caliphs, and to prove this he named his children their names. This is of course unfound, and it is very clear what Imam Ali's feelings were towards them. 

And Allah knows best.

105017

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I think the initial response you would probably hear is be patient, he is probably under pressure, try not to take sides, and so on. 

However, if such a man has no consideration for religious teachings or moral conduct, then the only solution is authority. Once upon a time elders would intervene, and such a husband/father would be deterred and feel ashamed, resulting in stopping such behaviour. Unfortunately, our communities do not have that level of respect anymore. 

It starts with your mother, as she needs to have the courage and ability to leave him. She must know that by her staying in this relationship she is exposing her children to violence, trauma and irreversible damage. She probably comes from a mindset that no matter what, the husband/father can do anything, but this is extremely wrong and damaging. 

By contacting the authorities, although your mother, or even some family members would be upset with you, but you are stopping and preventing harm upon your mother and your siblings. 

The police, social workers, court, etc will be able to give something to him that you or your mother cannot, and that is help. He needs help, for anger management, maybe for mental stability. Maybe just a reminder that he cannot get away with this kind of oppressive behaviour, and so on. 

You will certainly be doing the right thing and bring this to an end.

These are my views on domestic violence and living with someone who systematically and continuously abuses family members. Of course, you should try to consult with someone close to you, and reach out for help, and also pray for your father as well. 

In shaa Allah other specialists in this forum will give suggestions and advice to you as well.

With prayers for your success. 

105029

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

In an Islamic marriage contract, it is necessary to stipulate a nuptial gift, or what we call sidāq or mahr, and it can be anything that has a value, like teaching to recite Quran, or a copy of a Quran, etc. 

There are many benefits of having such a mahr and not demanding high mahr. There is a statement from the holy Prophet (s.a.w.) that says the best of the women of my ummah is she with the less mahr.

Mahr is not a sign of love, or a security bond, but only a gesture and token of truthfullness, and anything spiritual will of course carry many benefits in this dunya and in akhirah.

With prayers for your success.

103630

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 weeks ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If you pray the nafilah prayer, then that is the mustahab thing to do, to pray it on its time, and then pray the wajib prayer, and with doing this, you will not be deprived of anything. 

You will gain the reward of the nafilah prayer, and the reward of praying on time, which in reality that is what you are doing. 

Therefore, there is no need for you to pray the nafilah prayer before its allocated time. 

And Allah knows best. 

103617

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 weeks ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Although you might have been young, but you must have known that talking ill about someone is a bad thing. If this person is still alive, and you do see him, greet him, and just say 'forgive me if I have wronged you', without going into details. 

I am sure he wont comment on anything, and answer in a positive way, and your conscience will be clear, in shaa Allah.

With prayers for your success. 

103389

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 weeks ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If the 10 year old is a female, who has reached her shar'i age of bulugh, then yes, she will need to pay the kaffarah of 'feeding 60 poor', along with doing the qadha' of that day. 

If it was a male, then no, he does not. 

And Allah knows best.