Karbala

Karbala (كَرْبَلَاء‎, romanized: Karbalāʾ; Persian: کربلا‎) or Kerbala is a city in central Iraq, located about 100 km (62 mi) southwest of Baghdad, and a few dozen miles east of Lake Milh. Karbala is the capital of Karbala Governorate, and has an estimated population of 700,000 people (2015). The city, best known as the location of the Battle of Karbala in 680 CE, or the Mosques of Imam Husayn and Abbas, is considered a holy city for Shi'ite Muslims in the same way as Mecca and Medina.

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Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb, Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb has a BA in Law from Guilan University, Iran and has also undertaken Hawzah studies in Qom. He is a Cultural Affairs director of Ethics Group of Al-Mustafa Open... Answered 2 weeks ago

Salaamun Alaikum
 
SHAFAQNA – Imam Sajjad (AS) had severe stomach ache in Karbala to an extent that he could not carry weapons or fight [1,2,3]. The illness started in Karbala and not from the time Imam Hussain (AS) started his journey towards Iraq. Of course his illness was a divine plan so that one child would remain from Imam Hussain (AS) to undertake the Imamate and the leadership of Muslims.

[1] Basaerul Darajat, Saffar Qomi, Pages 148 and 163.

[2] Alershad, Sheikh Mofeed, Page 114.

[3] E’alammul Wara, Tabarsi, Page 246.

for more info please open this link:
https://makarem.ir/main.aspx?typeinfo=23&lid=1&mid=323592&catid=30021&start=1&pageindex=0

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 2 weeks ago

Further explanation: In some cultures, dating back to ancient or mediaeval times (including parts of Europe/Britain as well as Greece), it was considered inappropriate or immodest for respectable women to ride horses in the normal way, especially if they were wearing long dresses that might not stay in place, so women were expected to ride side-saddle or, as Sayyed mentions, in a litter atop the animal. (I am not saying that no women ever rode horses the normal way, just that this was considered more mannerly.) It seems that women riding horses the normal way may have been seen as suggestive, although, nowadays, in much of the world, there is no stigma attached to it. 

If they rode bare horses or regularly saddled horses during that time, it could be taken as a sign of them being treated harshly by the enemy. 

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 weeks ago

Muslim women used to sit on Hawdaj which is like a seat put on the animal and not directly on the animal. Sitting directly on the animal or on saddles is Makrouh for women.

Wassalam.

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The Prophet (s) used to pray on earth and is also reported to have shown reverence towards the soil of Karbala in his lifetime with the foreknowledge of what would happen upon it.

So although it is not compulsory for the Shia to pray on a turba made from the soil of Karbala, it is considered meritorious to do so.

You can read more details with full references here:

https://www.al-islam.org/articles/laws-and-practices-why-do-shiah-prostrate-turbah

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

We have in our books that many other sons of Imam Ali (AS) were martyred in Karbala beside Imam Husain (AS) and four sons from Ummul Baneen e.g. Ebrahim ibn Ali, Bakr ibn Ali, Amr ibn Ali, Mohammad al-Asghar ibn Al, Abdullah al-Asghar ibn Ali.

Wassalam,

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 5 months ago

Imam Hasan (A) is said to have had about 15 or 16 children, but there are some historical disagreements about the details of how many children he had or who else [apart from al-Qasim's mother] he also was married to.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 5 months ago

Allah (SWT) the Glorious, has saved Imam al-Sajjad (AS) in Kerbala to
keep the Imamate which is compulsory not only for Islam and Muslims
but also for the whole universe. Sadaat are not only the grand
children of Imam Husain (AS) but also the grand children of Imam Hasan
(AS) who are also called Hasani Sadaat. In fact all the Grand Children of Bani
Hashim, the grand-father of the Holy Prophet (SAWA) are called
Saadaat.

Wassalaam.

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 5 months ago

Well, there are also a lot of descendants of Imam al-Hasan (A) especially in places like Morocco. It is recorded to have been said that if Imam al-Husayn (A) was killed, there would be no grandson of the Prophet (S) alive on the earth anymore, in the sense of the son of the daughter of the Prophet (S). This is true, as Imam Hasan (A) had already been martyred by that time.

However the line of the Imamate went through Imam al-Sajjad (A) so the line of the imamate would have been cut off in that way. 

Anyway, it is a good question and demonstrates excellent critical thinking skills!

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

Many people traveled from Madina with Imam Husain (AS) but their numbers are not exactly known to us because we find in different books of history different numbers.

You can find some details on the website of mam Husain Shrine www.imamhussain.org

Wassalam.

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 8 months ago

as salam alaikum

different sources depict Shimr Ibn Dhil-Jawshan and Sinan Ibn Anas as the killers of Husayn, peace be upon him. It is evident that both played a role in the killing although there may be some variations in the details of various reports. Both were fighting along the army of 'Umar Ibn Sa'd, sent by 'Ubaydullah Ibn Zayd, appointed by Yazid Ibn Mu'awiyah. 

With prayers for your success.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 8 months ago

It is permissible to prostrate on a clay on which something is written, though it is much better to prostrate on plain clay ( Torbah) or Mohr or Sajdagah.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 9 months ago

No Sajda but only to Allah (SWT).

The Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) and The Infallible Imams refused and forbade Sajda to them and said that Sajda is only to Allah (SWT).

We have many authentic Hadeeths on this fact.

The Sajda of the angles to Adam (AS) was in fact to Allah (SWT) who ordered the angles to do it.

Sajda in the shrines of Ahlu Bayt (AS) is in fact Sajda of Shokr (Thanking Prostration) , to thank Allah (SWT) who granted us he great bounty to reach and visit the shrines of Ahlul Bayt (AS).

Wassalam.