Qur'anic Verse

113742

According to Hadeeths narrated from Ahlul Bayt (AS), Kursi of Allah is His Knowledge about Skies and earths and creatures which has got an outer existence, while Arsh is His Full Knowledge about everything, which is more inclusive than Kursi. There are degrees of Knowledge, in which Arsh is deeper, wider and more inclusive than Kursi, that is why we read in the Hadeeth that The Kursi is within The Arsh. In the Hadeeth from Imam Ja'far Al-Sadiq (AS): Everything created by Allah is in the Kursi except His Arsh because it is greater than be included in The Kursi.

Hadeeth of Hanan ibn Sadeer from Imam Al-Sadiq (AS) when he was asked about Arsh and Kursi, he replied: Both of them are great gates of the Unseen. Kursi is the outer gate of the Unseen and Arsh is the inner gate of the Unseen.

Kursi is limited to the skies, earth and what is between them while Arsh is unlimited.

In some narrations we read that The Kursi is the knowledge which Allah granted to His Prophets and messengers, while  The Arsh is The Knowledge  which no one knows but Allah.

Wassalam.

131028

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

No, you do not need to take them off when you go to the bathroom, as long as you are certain they will not be contaminated with any najasah, and you keep them away from any impurity, or from you touching it without wudhu. 

Otherwise, you can take them off. 

Another suggestion would be to paint a layer of clear-colour nail polish.

And Allah knows best 

123716

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

Yes, it is allowed and rewarding to read the meanings of the Quranic verses in any language which you understand.

Wassalam.

126467

There is a similarity and difference between the prophets/messengers. The similarity is that they are all equal in being appointed as divine messengers and authorities. The difference is with respect to the nature of their position with Allah, and their own circumstances. 

So, these two verses reflect those two things.

2:136 is a statement of belief for us to profess. That is, WE must accept all the prophets/messengers as being equal in their validity. We must accept them all as having correct messages from Allah that are consistent with the messages of the other prophets. We are not allowed to accept some and reject others. This verse is in the context of criticizing the Jews and Christians for accepting some and rejecting others.

However, this does not mean that all the prophets and messengers were identical, as indicated in 2:253 and elsewhere. The prophets and messengers each had their unique circumstances and positions with Allah. For instance, Jesus was born in a unique way, Solomon had a unique kingdom, and the Prophet Muhammad (S) is considered to be the highest of the messengers.

 

126480

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 4 months ago

The assumption that the physical world must be lifeless and non-sentient arises is somewhat modern and became prominent along with the rise of a European secular worldview. Peoples throughout history have held (and continue to hold) a variety of views of whether or not there is some inherent intelligence or sentience in nature.

Anyway, a literal reading of the verse suggests that the mountains do indeed have some level of awareness or comprehension, such that they were able to understand what it would mean to be offered the "trust" (amanah), and reply.

Other interpretations of this verse include:

* The verse is metaphorical. That is, it means to say, if the mountains were able to speak and understand, this is what they would say - to emphasize the enormity of the amanah.
* The verse is referring to the inhabitants of the earth and mountains, such as people, earth, jinn, and angels. This view exists but is somewhat odd since humans took on the amanah. 

Personally I favour the literal understanding. It is in line with the Qur'anic verse that says that everything glorifies Allah but we do not understand it. So just we cannot understand the mountains does not mean they have no ability to communicate with Allah. However others may prefer other views. 

Even if one does not accept this literal meaning, it should be noted that on the Day of Resurrection, it is said that the earth will be able to speak and bear witness to what happened upon it, so the natural world will have awareness and the ability to speak then. 

124163

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 4 months ago

It is always highly recommended for every Muslim to recite Quran but when a person is in the state of Janabah or a female is in her menses, it becomes Haraam on them to recite the four verses of the obligatory Sajda. Rest of Quranic verses are always allowed and recommended to recite.
The narration of Makrouh for woman in her menses to recite more than seven verses in case it is authentic, does not mean no reward but less reward from the usual situation of purity.

Wassalam.

123338

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

People of Tubba' lived in Yemen and their king was Tubba' whose name was As'ad Abi Karib from the tribe of Himyar. Tubba's  community disobeyed Allah (SWT) hence they were punished and destroyed, but Tubba' himself was a good person as it is mentioned in the Narration: Don't accuse Tubba'.

Wassalam 

122875

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

Yes it is permissible to recite any Quranic verse including Ayat Al-Kursi on behalf of other believers and for their protection.

Wassalam.

121668

Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 7 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. The verse 5:55 is translated literally as the hadith literature identifies this verse with a specific event in which Imam Ali (as) gave charity to a beggar  whilst in the state of ruku.

May you always be successful 

100446

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 7 months ago

The environmental problems today are, in part, due to the attitude that spread during the Industrial Revolution that human beings have the God-given right to do whatever they want to the non-human world and use it as a product or resource. This was worsened by the push in capitalism to push people to consume beyond their needs. We know now today that this is not sustainable, although many of our livelihoods are stuck in this model. 

In contrast, the Qur'an treats the natural universe as aware and part of a whole, rather than as a dead resource to be used however humans will. For instance, it says that everything in creation praises Allah, it speaks of the concerns of ants and the lives of bees, birds have opinions, and the earth is made to speak (when it is offered the "trust" before human beings, and at the end of time).

When the Qur'an says that Allah made the human being a khalifah, this is understood to mean that the human being has the responsibility to be a responsible caretaker, not an overlord, over creation. We may consume plants and animals and use the treasures of the earth and the sea, but not wastefully or wantonly, since the wasteful are the "brothers of the shayatin".

This holistic view characterises many pre-modern human socities (and some modern ones). Reviving this view can help to lead to a better way to treat the natural environment.

As mentioned, the Qur'an also tells us not to waste and calls the wasteful the "brothers of the shayateen". This is a very strong statement, and suggests that wasteful overconsumption is a form of evil or delusion (as Shaytan's primary tool is deception). Today many of us are bombarded by the delusions of mass advertising and mass media encouraging overconsumption or unhealthy consumption.

The Qur'an also tells us to eat and drink of the good things of the earth. This does not include many of the factory processed foods or unhealthy food production, such as Coca cola, which are  some of the worst offenders in terms of packaging, production cost, etc. It also does not include abusive or destructive practices such as factory farming done unsustainably. 

These verses are also taken to include our responsiblity environmentally:
* “And do not commit abuse on the earth, spreading corruption.” (Qur’an, 2:60)
* “And do not desire corruption in the land. Indeed, God does not like corruptors.” (Qur’an 28:77).
* "Corruption has appeared on the sea and land due to what has transpired by the hands of men" (Qur'an 30:41).

Here, fasad (corruption) is taken to include environmental destruction. Especially in the last verse, this understanding seems apt, because of what is happening that is our fault, especially when it is combined with other forms of corruption such as political corruption and corporate greed.

A number of hadith directly or indirectly point to the importance of looking after the environment. There are some in this article. These are from a Sunni provenance, although this isn't an issue where there is a sectarian difference. https://www.ecomena.org/islam-and-environmental-protection/

With all of this, one might ask why Muslims are not at the forefront of environmental protection. Some are; there are certainly Muslims working for sustainable farming practices, reduced waste, eco-friendly mosques, fighting pollution, and the like. However, the economic and political circumstances of Muslim-majority countries classified as "developing nations" has made this extremely different in the face of the modern socio-economic structure (especially when there are other considerations such as war). 

Some further resources:
* Shaykh Jaffer Ladak has a number of speeches on the subject of environment and Islam and some other materials and would be a good resource.
* A conference paper published by Makbul Rahim on this environmental practices at Khoja Ithna Ashari Shia mosques and presented at The Islamic College in London.
* Seyyed Mostafa Damad, "A Philosophical Solution For The Environmental Crisis", in Journal of Shi‘a Islamic Studies, vol. 1, no. 1 (2008)
* And, of course, many others; for instance, if you search Google Scholar.

 

113597

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 12 months ago

There are four verses in Quran which we must prostrate when we recite or listen to any of them. They are: 1. The last verse in Sura al-'Alaq . 2. The last verse in Sura Najm. 3. A verse in Sura al-Sajda and 4. A verse in Sura Fussilat.

Immediate prostration is must and we don't need to have Wudhu, no facing Qibla in such prostration. Recitation during this prostration is recommended. It can be Subhanallah سبحان الله or Subhana Rabbi al-A'la Wa Bihamdih سبحان ربي الأعلى وبحمده m or any Du'a or Thikr of Allah even saying Ya Allah.

Wassalam.

109877

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 1 year ago

The Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) was asked when he recited this verse on the Muslims: Is it ordering us to do good to our kin or your kin? He replied: My kin; Ali, Fatima, and their sons. (Al-Haakim al-Hasakaani in Shawaahid al-Tanzeel , V. 2, P. 189) and Tafseer al-Qurtubi, V.3, P. 2.) . These are among Sunni references and among Shia references you can refer to Al-Kaafi 1:413.

We take the meanings of Quran from the Prophet (SAWA) as we were been ordered by Allah (SWT).

Wassalam.