Qur'anic Verse

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 days ago

Allah (SWT) is beyond time and space as He created every thing including time and space. The verse is mentioning the period of one day which has specific importance and not like our usual days. It is for angles and it is equal to our fifty thousand years. This day is created by Allah and never rule over Allah (SWT).

There are many days mentioned in Quran with different periods. Day in Quran does not always mean the usual day in our understanding which is 24 hours, but it is a time unit, with different periods depending on the nature of the Day.

Allah (SWT) is beyond any timing, though He created the time foe us and ordered us to act according to these timings.

Wassalam.

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 1 week ago

as salam alaikum

there is no direct reference in the above-mentioned verses about the religion of Abu Talib, neither to Abu Talib himself. The verse 28:56 is very general and says that Allah is the ultimate guide and that no one, even the Prophet, peace be upon him and his family, can guide the people if Allah doesn't wish. The verse 9:113 is also general and it is explained by its following verse (9:114) that talk about the prohibition to ask forgiveness for the polytheists, in particular it mentions the case of Ibrahim, peace be upon him, and Azar.

What made to conclude the majority of Sunni scholars that these verses refers to Abu Talib not being Muslim are some ahadith found in Bukhari and Muslim linking those verses to such opinion. There are other narrations and evidences to support the fact that Abu Talib was a Muslim: this is also an opinion held by a minority of Sunni scholars.  

In conclusion, these two verses should firstly and foremost interpreted according to their apparent meaning avoiding solitary reports (akhbar ahad) which are contradictory. Then, to establish historical facts, other ways than tafsir by solitary reports should be taken into consideration in order to determine truth and valid knowledge.

With prayers for your success.  

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 1 month ago

as salam alaikum

The rules of mahramiyyah apply to all mahrams: those mentioned in the ayah and those who are not mentioned.

With prayers for your success.

60603

Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 1 month ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. According to Zamakhshari in his commentary al-Kashshaf, using the pronoun fi gives the meaning of the Family of the Prophet (saw) being the place of established love, whereas the pronoun li only would explain who the love was for. Fi therefore gives a greater meaning.

May you always be successful 

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 1 month ago

as salam alaikum

the verse 3:7 does not speak about Sunnis or Shi'as. Rather it says that we should not make ta'wil of mutashabih verses. For example, in reference to the fruits of paradise it is said: "Whenever they are provided with its fruits for nourishment they will say:- This is the what we were provided before!-. But they were given something resembling it" (2:25). Here the believer should not force himself to conceptualize the nature and the taste of the fruits of paradise as its reality (ta'wil) does not belong to this world and it will be given to him in the next life insh'Allah.

With prayers for your success.

60769

Sayed Mahdi Modarresi, Sayed Mohammad Mahdi Al Modarresi undertook his religious education in the Islamic Seminary in Damascus, Syria, and in the Islamic Seminary of Qum, Iran. He also undertook some of his academic... Answer imported 1 month ago

59575

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

Kitab in Arabic language means book, but in these verses in Quran it means the Divine knowledge revealed from Allah ( SWT). 
Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 2 months ago

The verse ( Surely, your only masters are Allah, His messenger, and Those who establish prayers and give Zakat during Rokoo’) (5:55) was revealed when Ali (AS) gave his ring to a poor person during Rokoo’.

This fact is mentioned in many Sunni books like: 

1. Al-Majma’ Al-Awsat by al-Tabaraani , Hadeeth number 6414.

2. Al-Majma’ Al-Kabeer by al-Tabaraani, Hadeeth number 948.

3. Tafseer al-Tabari, Vol 6, page 389 ( Arabic).

4. Tafseer al-Dorr al-Manthour by Al-Soyooti, 2: 293.

5. Tafseer ibn Katheer, 7:394.

6. Tafseer al-Qurtobi , 6:221.

7. Tafseer ibn Abi Haatam , Hadeeths 6583, 6585 and 6587.

8. Ma’rifat al-Sahabah by Abi Na’eem, Hadeeth 815.

9. Ma’rifat Oloom Al-Hadeeth by Al- Hakim, Hadeeth 210.

10. Hilyat al-Awliyaa’ , Hadeeth 3835.

11. Tafseer al-Baidhaawi in Tasfeer of 5:55.

12. Tafseer al-Fakhrudin Al-Raazi, 12: 25 to 31.

13. Noor al-Absaar by Shiblanji , page 86 and 87.

14. Tafseer al-Kashshaaf by Al-Zamakhshari, 1: 624.

15. Kanz al-Ommal, 13:108

and many other books.

Wassalam.

58848

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

If you remember the verse in your mind, it is not called reciting but just thinking or remembering. Sajda is obligatory on reciting or listening to any of the known four verses of Sajda.

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 2 months ago

"Imam mubin" ("manifest imam", "clear imam", or "clear record") is generally understood to refer to a divine record in which all things and divine decrees are inscribed.

(Some exegetes have explained that it is called the "imam" of divine records because it is the highest of the books, hence the leader of books, as opposed to lesser divine records, such as individuals' scrolls of deeds.)

Some hadith also say that the "imam mubin" is Imam Ali. In one hadith, Imam Ali is quoted as saying that, "I am the imam mubin. I distinguish between truth and falsehood, and I have inherited this from the Messenger of Allah."

Perhaps both views are correct, in that it is possible for Allah to provide any of His servants with knowledge of all things.

Some hadith offer explanations for the circumstances of revelation for this verse. However, they do not relate to the phrase "imam mubin" but rather refer to why the previous phrase ("what they have sent ahead and their effects [which they left behind]") might have been revealed. These relate to the community in Medina as well as the general idea that people are rewarded or punished after death for the good or bad practices or legacies they have left behind. However, they do not say anything specific linking the word "imam" directly to the occasion of revelation. I am not aware of any hadith that do this, although there may be some!
 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

​​​​​This verse does inform the wrongdoers about the result of their bad deeds, but it does not suggest at all that all the natural disasters are results of human actions.

In some cases mentioned in Quran and authentic Hadeeths, natural disasters came on sinners who insisted on major sins, like people of Noah and people of Loot, but not all the natural disasters are same. Natural disasters can fall on Muslims and non Muslims, which means that it is not always a punishment. It is related to natural factors and reasons created by Allah (SWT) who created the Universe. Even those innocents who suffer from natural disasters will not be let with out appropriate compensation from Allah which is much greater that their loss. Those innocents who die from natural disasters will be granted much better and happier life.

The Mercy of Allah is greater than any suffering whatsoever.

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 3 months ago

Historical sources list 4 daughters for the Prophet (S). It is not clear whether all of them were his biological daughters, or only one (namely, Fatimah al-Zahra).

If he only had one biological daughter, the other 3 girls who are mentioned in some sources as his daughters would have been girls that he was raising (as adopted daughters), and it would be reasonable to refer to them all generally in this context as "daughters". 

Using a plural also does not preclude daughters in the future, whether they be biological daughters (which didn't happen) or step-daughters (which would have been an open possibility given that he remarried after Hazrat Khadijah). However, if the verse had only said "daughter", and he only had one daughter, it would have been a specific instruction for a specific person and not a general instruction.

Also, the Qur'an occasionally uses a plural form to indicate generality, not multiplicity. For instance, the verse of mubahilah instructs the Prophet to take "our selves" and "our women" (in the plural) to the meeting for mubahilah, but he only brought one person as his "self" (Imam 'Ali) and one person as "his women" (Fatimah al-Zahra'). 

Lastly, a prophet can be considered a father of his people (as in "I and 'Ali are the fathers of this ummah"), and so referring, in general, to the girls of the community as his "daughters" would not be unreasonable, particularly since the verse also addresses the "believing women", although admittedly this is not the interpretation that first comes to mind. 

Historical matters can be complicated. It can be difficult to know the exact details of what happened over a thousand years ago. One has to have faith that Allah has preserved what is necessary for us to know, and in this case the emphasis is on the spirit of the ayah rather than the specifics of lineage.