God (Allah)

Allah (الله‎, romanized: Allāh) is the Arabic word for God in Abrahamic religions. In the English language, the word generally refers to God in Islam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 4 days ago

It isn't appropriate to say whether the corona virus is man-made or not without clear evidence.

However, one can also consider a third option - namely, not all acts of God are punishment, even if they involve destruction. We learn from the Qur'an, such as the story of Khidr (A), that sometimes things that seem evil are actually for the greater good. Also, it is good to remember that there have been plagues throughout most of human history, so it isn't something new; it is only because we have become accustomed to modern medicine, and because of globalization, that it seems unusual.

That being said, from a theological angle, the Qur'an and hadith indicate that there are metaphysical laws for societies that go beyond material cause and effect. That is, acts of evil or injustice may bring about a negative consequence for that society even if the material chain of cause and effect is not readily apparent. (This should not be taken to mean that countries with high levels of infection currently are suffering from their own injustices; it is just a general principle.)

Our world is rife with injustice and imbalance, including warfare, sanctions, overconsumption, economic injustice, and environmental destruction. It is reasonable to look at the coronavirus situation in that light (and by "situation" I mean not only the virus but the sociopolitical response), and to consider that, in addition to material factors relating to the spread of the virus (such as airplanes and urbanization), it may be (a) an act of God designed to give us the opportunity to bring out and fix some of those problems, or (b) a natural consequence as part of metaphysical laws of cause and effect.

(Of course, all of these things often work together. In fact, even if it did transpire that it was manmade, things still happen with the permission of God; as the Qur'an says, they plan, and Allah plans, and Allah is the best of planners.)

In any case, regardless of the origins of the virus, our responses to it are manmade (even if we have little control as individuals). This includes positive responses, such as helping others, and negative responses, such as taking advantage of it for political and national gain, or hoarding. 

When individuals get sick, there is no one answer as to why - everyone's circumstances are different. One person can get sick simply as part of the natural chain of cause and effect and the spread of infection. Another can get sick as a divine test, divine trial, or to adjust their lives due to the divine decree (for instance, to stop them from moving to another country). A third person might get sick because it is their time to die, and Allah has hidden death in various causes. So, it is not possible to give one answer for what happens to individuals, although we can often get a sense of what is happening with ourselves through self-reflection. 
 
It is also a good time for prayer. Here is a prayer attributed to Imam Rida (A) in the book Tibb al-A'immah for times of plague:

In the name of Allah, the compassionate, the merciful

There is no strength or might except in Allah, the exalted, the mighty.

Nothing is of benefit without the permission of Allah. I have placed my trust in Allah. Healing can only happen through Allah. Whatever Allah wills happens, and none can dispel evil but Allah. I am sufficed by Allah who created me and therefore guides me, who grants me food and drink, and heals me when I am ill. And we have sent down from the Qur'an healing and mercy for the believers. 

O Allah, grant us well-being, and do not separate between ourselves and well-being, O creator of well-being, O most merciful of the merciful.
 

Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb, Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb has a BA in Law from Guilan University, Iran and has also undertaken Hawzah studies in Qom. He is a Cultural Affairs director of Ethics Group of Al-Mustafa Open... Answered 5 days ago

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 5 days ago

as salam alaikum

it may be true in some cases but we cannot generalize for all people and all illnesses. For example books of history tells us that Abu Lahab got very ill during his last stages of life and it was not for wiping out his sin.

With prayers for your success.

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Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb, Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb has a BA in Law from Guilan University, Iran and has also undertaken Hawzah studies in Qom. He is a Cultural Affairs director of Ethics Group of Al-Mustafa Open... Answered 5 days ago

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 1 week ago

as salam alaikum

there is no clear reference to the fact that some people attempted to worship the Prophet as god during his lifetime. Rather the Qur'an tells us about another tendency among the disbelievers of his time: "Those who entertain no fear about being present before Us, nor do they expect it, say:- Why should not the angels be sent down on us or we see our Lord?-" (25:21). Their asking for angels and even for the Lord himself shows that they did not believe that the Prophet could be a god.

We can deduce this fact also by their saying: " Shall a mere human being guide us?" (64:6).

If someone would have tried to worship the Prophet as god certainly we would have known by multiple reports as such claim would have circulated and caused a particular sensation at that time.

With prayers for your success.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 weeks ago

Allah (SWT) saved and saves billions of human beings from harm with out forcing them, but He has given us free will and ability and help to do good or the freedom to do bad if we opt for it . Many prophets and infallible Imams were killed by enemies of Allah who opted to be criminals and insisted on that. Allah (SWT) does not force people to avoid bad as He has examined them and gave them free will after showing them the right path.

The crimes are the responsibility of the criminals and we can never expect Allah (SWT) to stop the criminals, otherwise the whole system of life will be disturbed as life is based on free will to do good or bad and there no meaning of good or bad if we expect Allah (SWT) to force people.

Wassalam.

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 2 weeks ago

as salam alaikum

our relationship with Allah should be based on worship and servitude. Concentration may be a part of worship but it is not its finality because to focus on ideas and meanings, as lofty as they may be, can be in some cases a form of distraction from the One to Whom our worship is directed. There is a fundamental element in worship distinguished from different forms of exercises and concentration. Mere concentration may improve our capability of meditation on an object but may not be classified as real worship. That is why sometimes worship has been compared to a lover admiring his loved one without focusing on what he is saying to him. 

If our intention is to satisfy Allah, we won't have any ambition to reach a particular state or stage and that is when the heart get ready to receive more favors and grace from his Lord. In other words, a pure intention, attitude and lifestyle in the light of the teachings of Islam are often more effective than alienating yourself trying to grasp something behind single moments through basic concentration.  

With prayers for your success.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 weeks ago

No doubt, Allah (SWT) is the absolute needless, but He also is the Most
Merciful, the Most Compassionate, the Most Gracious and He showers His
Mercy. The creation of all Creatures was because of His Mercy which He
wanted to shower on His creatures. He created them and us to make us
enjoy His Mercy. There is no question of need but it is a gesture of
kindness and generosity from Allah (SWT) on the creatures whom He
created.

(response to a similar question was given earlier in this
forum which you may also refer to)

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 weeks ago

The narration from Imam Ali (AS) that “I recognized Allah (SWT) through
revoking of determination and the breaking of the decisions  ( عرفت الله سبحانه بفسخ العزائم ونقض الهمم ) means that one of the clear signs of Allah (SWT) is that the
decisions of people are not always fulfilled or implemented as they decided. Allah (SWT)' decision is The Final.

The human being should never think that he will do what he wants to do
and he will achieve his determination and decisions. Allah (SWT)
creates different situations and circumstances which make many of the
determinations and decisions invalid. This is one of the signs of the
unlimited power of Allah (SWT).

Wassalam.

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 3 weeks ago

The next part of the quotation reads: “I recognized God through revoking the determinations and breaking the intentions. When I determined and I was prevented from achieving my determination and I intended and the fate contradicted my intention, I realized that the administrator was other than me.”

My understanding of this is that sometimes things do not happen in life as we plan or expect, either immediately or long-term. For instance, I may intend to go somewhere, but be stopped by illness, traffic, an unexpected visitor, an unexpected job, etc. I may never intend to go somewhere but be given an unexpected opportunity or gift. (For instance, how some people do not have the resources to perform the hajj but nonetheless are able to do it because someone else facilitates it for them. Some people have the money but are never able to go.)  This is true for everyday things as well as long-term things like a university education, a job, a marriage, etc.

Often, when you look back at the big picture, you can see that there was in fact a fate plan, and things did not happen randomly. This is a sort of internal evidence that there is a Planner. Of course, we still have free will and should make our efforts to plan and do our best in things!

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 3 weeks ago

The verse of the Qur'an discussing this (7:143) does not say that Moses saw Allah in the mountains. Rather, it says that if Allah were to manifest Himself to the mountain and it were to remain standing, then Moses would see Allah. However, that does not happen; Allah unveils some aspect of His greatness before the mountain, and the mountain shatters to pieces. (It is said in hadith that the way that Allah did this was by having one of the cherubim - i.e. one of the angels - shine part of its light onto the mountain.) Also, Moses passes out. Thus, Moses understands that no one and nothing can bear seeing Allah. 

Seyed Ali Shobayri, Seyed Ali Shobayri is of mixed Iranian and Scottish descent who found the path of the Ahlul Bayt (a) by his own research. He holds a BA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University through the... Answer updated 3 weeks ago

Bismillah, 

Asalamu Alaykom, 

In the Shia Islamic belief, Allah is not confined within time or space. To confine Allah in a form or within a time frame, would limit him. This is no different to the Christian beliefs which state that God came down in the form of a person (Audhobillah). This belief is also similar to the Salafi beliefs where they compare Allah with his creation and give him physical movements and parts.

Therefore, we wouldn't say that Allah literally came down to earth rather any communication to Prophet Musa (peace be upon him) would of been through a type of creation from Allah. We can say that this incident was a manifestation of Allah's power and glory. 

Furthermore, when Allah told Prophet Musa (peace be upon him): "You will never see Me" 7:143 this applies in both this world and the hereafter. This is unlike some other sects who believe that Allah will be seen on he day of judgment; for the Shia belief, Allah cannot be literally seen otherwise this would necessitate Allah being in an image and form. 

May Allah grant you success