Women

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 1 month ago

First of all, we as Muslims believe that Allah is The All Knowing, Most Wise, Most Merciful and we believe that everything comes from Him is based on full wisdom for our interest, that is why we never question His Wisdom in any matter. We believe that the full reason is best known by Allah (SWT), the Messenger (SAWA) and Ahlul Bayt (AS) who are the real successors of the Prophet (SAWA).

We also believe that our human abilities of thinking are limited and can never reach to everything. We know for sure that every order from Allah (SWT) is based on our benefit and we don't question the details.

Hijab is obligatory on females because Allah (SWT) who created males and females made males more attracted to females than females to males in usual situations. Hair of man can be attractive to some females in some situations but females are in general are much more attractive to males. This can be one of the reasons. Men are responsible to work hard to earn livelihood for their families. Hijab of women is for maintaining her dignity, modesty, safety and honour. Hijab also provide safe atmosphere away from sinful acts. Allah (SWT) says in Quran about Hijab on women (So that they are known so that they should not be harmed ( كي يُعرَفنَ فلا يؤذَين)) 33:59).

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, it is permissible to watch movies, or series, or TV in general, for both men and women, as long as it does not entail anything haram. 

Of course, what is meant by entailing haram, or even spiritually bad/immoral, are things like haram lust, haram gaze. Also, being negatively influenced is another important thing to always keep in mind. We can see how damaging this cultural invasion is, systematically making the world desensitised towards certain unethical practises. 

This is why we can see that our esteemed jurists have at times prohibited the watching of programs or series coming from certain countries with bad agendas and subliminal messages. 

It is a matter of not just being religiously responsible, but also alert and aware of not becoming negatively influenced or change our Islamic mindset due to being "brainwashed" by constant viewing of negative propaganda. 

Another point I would like to add is moderation. No need for "binging-viewing". Balance your free time, with various activities, and your priority should always be that you are healthy, physically, spiritually and mentally. 

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, it is permissible for Muslim women to wear high heels, as long as it is not considered as zeenah that should be concealed, and does not attract lustful gazes of non-mahram men. 

And Allah knows best.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

This is a bit of a complicated question, because it can be looked at from various angles. 

Assuming that the question is asked by a woman living in a non-Islamic country.

We will have to consider a few scenarios that would occur and will determine whether she is able to overcome these situations, from a shar'i perspective.

Will she be able to observe her correct hijab, and modesty, along with her other religious obligations, like salat, sawm, etc.

As a police-woman, there could be situations where she will have to freely mix with non-mahrams, like a non-mahram male police partner, and that could be a problem.

There would be situations where she will have to physically handle a man, and if it not emergency cases, then that could also be a problem, from a shar'i perspective.

Will she be enforcing something that is legally lawful, but religious prohibited. That is going to be an issue as well. 

What if she chooses to work a desk job, and not patrolling the streets, for example? In this case, she also needs to look at whatever scenarios that could arise, and decide whether it is suitable for her or not.

Yes, we understand that in every occupation there are going to be challenges, and shar'i matters that a woman, and even a man, must take into consideration when they choose their career path. However, that being said, it is always best to be realistic and find something that one will be comfortable with and also represent their deen in the best way possible.

Personally, I believe we Muslims in the West do need female police officers, not just for the purpose of showing that a Muslim woman can be in the work force, but so that she can contribute in educating her colleagues more about how the Muslim community is. But of course, as long as it does not clash with her religious and family commitments.

And Allah knows best. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

This question is similar to many other fiqhi questions, where one would need to refer to his/her Marja' taqleed. 

That being said, according to the view of most of our esteemed jurists, Ahlul Kitab are not najis, and as for temporary marriage with a Kitabiyah woman, most Maraji' also deem it as halal.

And Allah knows best.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

It is recommended for the women during her menstruation period to perform Wudhu in the time of Prayers and wear her prayers dress and sit on her place of prayers and be busy in remembering Allah for time like her prayer time. This Wudhu break like any other Wudhu although such Wudhu does not allow her to perform Namaz because of her menstruation.

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 4 months ago

This subject has been broached here, and perhaps the fact that you are asking about it will encourage others to add some thoughts on it.

https://www.al-islam.org/ask/why-does-a-husband-have-the-power-in-islam-...

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 5 months ago

For the most part, we don't have strong historical evidence about the details of what women from the Ahl al-Bayt (A) were wearing, apart from a few situations where there was a reason to mention a specific fabric or something.

Anyway, without being an expert in the history of clothing, it seems that in some places, the tendency to wear black is pre-modern (and I suspect due to convenience) and in some places it is a product of modernity. When discussing today's "Islamic fashions", it is worth keeping in mind that what we have access to today is largely due to industrialization - for instance, the production of synthetic fabrics, cheap stretchy socks, and mass-produced garments - and people in the past did not have these things. Also, the concept of global "Islamic fashion" (often epitomized by the black Saudi-style abayah) is relatively new and probably due to globalization; up until recent decades, Muslims seemed to tend to wear their own regional styles more. 

(There are, however, some interesting books about the history of clothing in the Muslim world, if it is a subject of interest, as well as some early photographs)

To my knowledge, in places like Iran, in the past, it was more common to wear coloured chadors, but in the 20th century, black became the popular colour. 

Anyway, shari'ah in and of itself does not regulate what colour you have to wear. However, a general principle is that of 'urf; that is, one should dress in such a way which is considered normal in the area and does not attract attention (unless there is a clear reason to do otherwise, for instance, everyone may be wearing a bikini on the beach, but that doesn't mean it's appropriate to wear a bikini). So colours are one of the matters of 'urf; in some places, it might be normal and appropriate to wear bright colours, and in other places, such as Qom, it might attract a lot of attention or be an inappropriate form of social signalling. Non-Muslm countries also tend to vary widely in their 'urf regarding the colours people wear so it is really left to one's individual judgment, or you could ask people around you if you are concerned. 

Anyway, as is said, Allah is beautiful and loves beauty, and Allah created all the colours and did not make any of them inherently taboo.*

(*apart from cases where wearing certain colours is specifically considered makruh, this is not the main subject here)

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 6 months ago

There are a few reasons, including:

* Modesty (regarding explicit subjects, the Qur'an tends to be more modest and address men specifically as well as use euphemisms, even if both men and women are intended)
* Generality (zawj/azwaj can be understood in some cases to mean "spouses" in general and not specifically "wives" as it is often translated)
* In some cases, it is specifically addressing men and speaking about women (for instance, the verse about zihar when it talks about men divorcing their wives via zihar)

So it really depends on the verse. A good resource to look at for varying interpretations of verses is _The Study Quran_ edited by S. H. Nasr.

Hope that helps!

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 6 months ago

This question has been discussed to some degree here: https://www.al-islam.org/ask/topics/7744/questions-about-Houris

Anyway, it seems that this is said in the Qur'an as a form of encouragement (just as some things about Hell can be seen as a discouragement from doing certain things). Apparently this must have been or indeed must be encourgaging to men. As for why men are addressed and promised this instead of women, some might say it is out of modesty, although I might also suggest that perhaps men need a little more encouragement sometimes! :)

As for what virginity means in the Hereafter... that is more complicated question. One would assume that the physics of things is somewhat different there, and while there is a means for 2 beings to relate which is analagous to how 2 beings relate here, it is unlikely to involve all of the specific physiological details of earthly virginity.

There is also a certain logic behind saying that the huris are "not touched by jinn or men", since (a) it is generally held that jinn have their own Paradise and so they wouldn't be interacting with them anyway, and (b) there won't be people in Paradise until the judgment, so they wouldn't have had anyone to have a relationship with before. (c) Also since there are so many of them, perhaps they are all created as exact matches (soul-mates, if you will) to their human partners and not necessarily compatible with others.

As for women, seeing as it is said that we can more or less have whatever we want in Paradise, there is no reason what women should not have virgins, if that is what they would like.

That being said, I am sure you will agree that men are the cause of 90% of headaches for women in this world, so I would not be surprised if some women decide they would like some peace and quiet instead!

(With all apologies to our male colleagues who may completely disagree :) )

Anyway, Allah speaks to us according to our understanding in this world, when it comes to matters outside of this world, there is a certain amount of guesswork or theorizing when it comes to these questions. It is however an interesting question to ponder.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 6 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, one is allowed to undergo plastic surgery, like rhinoplasty,  and it is halal in itself. Of course, one must be observant of other things that it could entail that could be haram, like touching of a non-mahram, etc. 

And Allah knows best.  

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

I did not find any authentic Hadeeth in Shia books of Hadeeth suggesting that most of Dajjal's followers will be women. It is narrated in many Sunni books e.g. Musnad Ahmad Ibn Hanbal from Abdullah Ibn Omar.

Wassalam.