Imam al-Hasan

Imam al-Ḥasan ibn Alī ibn Abī Ṭālib (الحسن ابن علي ابن أبي طالب‎‎, 624–670 CE), commonly known as Hasan or Hassan, is the eldest son of Muhammad's daughter Fatimah and of Ali, and the older brother to Husayn. Muslims respect him as a grandson of the Islamic Prophet Muhammad. Among Shia Muslims, Hasan is revered as the 2nd Imam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 2 months ago

This story is mentioned in the book Ithbat al-Hodat, compiled by al-Hurr al-'Amili (vol. 4, p. 28).

The gist of the story is a king in China killed his daughter and a member of his court, regretted it, and sought advice from his court on how to bring them back to life. One of the viziers said there is a man in Medina named al-Hasan ibn 'Ali who could do this. The king told him he had a month to bring al-Hasan there (even though it was about a 6 month journey from China to Medina). The vizier prayed intensely, and, while he was praying, he heard a voice saying "Rise". He rose and found Imam al-Hasan (A) there. Imam al-Hasan (A) passed his hand over the two people who had been killed and prayed that Allah revive them, and they came back to life. Then the king married his daughter to Imam al-Hasan (A).

I am not aware of a chain of narration for the story and so it is not possible to say from that angle whether it is authentic or not. Also, I am not aware of any historical evidence that Imam al-Hasan (A) went to China. So, it is possible that this story is not historically true.

However, a number of hadith indicate that the Imams had the ability to miraculously travel from place to place instantaneously and perform karamat through the permission of Allah, and so that main idea in and of itself is reasonable and supported by other texts, even if this particular story might not be true.

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Rebecca Masterton, Dr Rebecca Masterton graduated with a BA in Japanese Language and Literature; an MA in Comparative East Asian and African Literature and a PhD in Islamic literature of West Africa. She has been... Answer updated 2 months ago

A good book to read on this is The Succession to Muhammad [s] by Wilferd Madelung, who explains very clearly the subtleties of the political situation of 'Uthman. 'Uthman had incited fury among Egyptians, Kufans and others because of his nepotism and awarding his family property that belonged to the umma. He had also cut 'Aisha's stipend, angering her. The Egyptians came as a delegation to 'Uthman with their grievances, but he refused to listen to them. Instead, he appealed to Imam Ali (as) to tell them to go away. Imam 'Ali (as) warned 'Uthman more than once that in order to calm the situation, he must listen to their grievances and correct his actions. 'Uthman refused to listen, and so Imam 'Ali (as) distanced himself. 'A'isha sent out letters inciting those who were angry with 'Uthman to kill him. 'Uthman's palace was stormed. Interestingly, 'Uthman was abandoned by his cousin Marwan and his sons in his time of need. Imam 'Ali (as) sent just Imam Hasan (as) (not Imam Husayn) and some others to try to calm the crowds, but they went ahead and killed 'Uthman. Because Imam 'Ali (as) had not directly intervened, Aisha later took advantage of this and accused him of being responsible for 'Uthman's murder. She used this allegation to try to overthrow Imam Ali (as). Imam 'Ali (as) says in sermon 30 in Nahj al-Balagha that both parties were in the wrong: 'Uthman was wrong for misappropriating property and governing badly; and the Egyptians and others were wrong for murdering 'Uthman, basically meaning that the grievances should have been addressed through a legal process: "If I had ordered his assassination I would have been his killer, but if I had prevented others from killing him I would have been his helper... I am putting before you his case.  He appropriated wealth and did it badly.  You protested against it and committed excesses therein. With Allah lies the real verdict between the appropriator and the protestor.' Thus, in sending Imam Hasan (as) to try to calm the crowds, Imam 'Ali (as) was not actually siding with 'Uthman, nor supporting him, but was rather trying to prevent excessive and unlawful behaviour on behalf of the aggrieved parties.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 3 months ago

Imam Hasan (A) is said to have had about 15 or 16 children, but there are some historical disagreements about the details of how many children he had or who else [apart from al-Qasim's mother] he also was married to.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 8 months ago

Allah knows the wisdom behind every thing He ordained. We believe in the Absolute Wisdom of Allah and do not go in to details which is out of our reach of thinking. Our Faith in the Absolute Wisdom of Allah (SWT) is enough for us and it is the real and proper way when we deal with decisions of Allah ( SWT).

We and all the scholars might thing about some reasons like the reward of the sacrifice in Karbala, but that can never be the full reason.We always say: Allah and His messenger know more. الله ورسوله أعلم 

The question Why when it comes on any rule from Allah can mislead people who do not have enough submission to the will and wisdom of Allah (SWT).

In the life of all the prophets and infallible Imams, similar question about reasons of succession can mislead weak hearted persons who don’t have real faith in the absolute Wisdom of Allah (SWT).

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 9 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala 

It is mentioned in history books of both Shi'a and Sunni sides that at the time of the martyrdom of Imam Hasan al-Mujtaba (a.s.), 'Aishah gathered some people, mounted a mule, and prevented the Imam from being buried next to his grandfather's grave. 

In order to avoid any further bloodshed, Imam Husain (a.s.) buried his elder brother in Jannatul-Baqi' Cemetary.

With prayers for your success. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 10 months ago

Allah (The Glorious) knows whom to appoint as an Imam and we have no authority nor capacity to know. We definitely believe that every order by Allah (SWT) is based on the absolute benefit of human beings and the whole universe.

Al-Hasan Al-Muthanna was never an Imam, as the Imamate after Imam Husain (AS) was to Imam Ali Zainul Abideen (AS). No one from Imam Hasan's sons or grand sons was an Imam.

All the names of the Twelve Imams were clearly mentioned by the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) in many authentic Hadeeths. (Ithbaat Al-Hudaat By Al-Hurr Al-Aamily in three volumes).

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 10 months ago

Not true.

Al-Hasan Ibn Al-Hasan who is known as Al—Hasan Al-Muthanna was injured in Karbala but was taken by Asmaa’ Ibn Kharija al-Fizari to Kufa and was treated there then went back to Madina.  He was looking after the charities left by Imam Ali ( AS ) in Madina.

 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi Ta'ala

From the Shi'a point of view an Imam is not chosen by people. Even the ma'soom Imam himself does not chose who the next Imam will be. It is something exclusively appointed by Almighty God.

We clearly know that an Imam must have certain characteristics, the most important of them is 'Ismah, which is not something that can be acquired, and it is something endowed by the Almighty.  

In addition to this, we see that the Prophet had mentioned who the Ahlul Bayt (a.s.) were, and the numerous famous traditions of the Twelve Khalifahs have also mentioned this. 

Even in the case of Imam Husain (a.s.), it was one of his sons who was divinely selected and appointed to be the next Imam. 

Another point that can be mentioned here is that the descendents of Imam Hasan (a.s.) did have a continuous role in Imamah.One example for this is that Imam Muhammad al-Baqir's (a.s.) mother was the daughter of Imam al-Mujtaba (a.s.). This means that Imam al-Baqir (a.s.) goes back to both Imam Hasan and Imam Husain (a.s.). 

There is a tradition that says as a result of the greatest sacrifice made by Imam Husain (a.s.), he was blessed with three things:

1. The lineage of the Imams are from him.

2. There is cure in his soil.

3. Prayers are answered under his dome. 

May the Almighty grant us their shafa'ah.

 Wassalam

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answer updated 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The case of Imam Hasan al-Mujtaba (a.s.) having married a large number of women, and also excessively divorcingو is a topic that can be approached from different angles.

The claim is that Imam al-Mujtaba (a.s.) was a Mitlaaq, which means someone who excessively divorces (from the word talaq). 

There are some narrations that hint to this in certain Sunni hadith books, which, for Shi'a, do not carry recognition, based on its sources and also other hadith related principles.

However, the issue is that there are some very scarce and random narrations dispersed in some Shi'a hadith books, like Sheikh al-Kulaini's al-Kafi, that do mention such a thing.  

There are different views regarding this issue: 

Some scholars, a number of them were Akhbaris, have defending this view, saying that because such has been stated in al-Kafi, hence it must be authentic. 

Some justifications have been given that in reality is not correct and the Imam did not excessively marry, but Imam Ali (a.s.) spread this rumour to discourage people from marrying him and misusing his status.  

Another view is that Imam al-Mujtaba (a.s.) wanted to increase the number of descendants of the holy Prophet (s.a.w). 

However, there are many problems with accepting these narrations. 

This claim is far from any reality, and nothing more than a myth. In one narration it says that a whole caravan of women had claimed that they were his ex-wives. This is very distant from the basic conduct of a normal person, let alone a Ma'soom. Divorce itself was something disliked during the pre-Islamic Jahiliyah age, and so how can we even think that the Imam (a.s.) would engage in such a thing, and so frequently.

We cannot deny the attempts made by the enemies to defame the members of Ahlul Bayt (a.s.). This being said, if there was any level of truth to this issue, why do we not have any reference of the likes of Mu'awiyah mentioning this against the Imam (a.s.). 

There is a lot more than can be said about this topic, but in brief it is nothing but a myth and far from the moral and divine status of the Imam (a.s.).

For further reading, please refer to the following book which has discussed this in detail:

https://www.islamic-college.ac.uk/shop/introduction-to-rijal-studies/

Wassalam

Rebecca Masterton, Dr Rebecca Masterton graduated with a BA in Japanese Language and Literature; an MA in Comparative East Asian and African Literature and a PhD in Islamic literature of West Africa. She has been... Answer updated 1 year ago

It is reported supposedly from Ja'far as-Sadiq and Imam 'Ali (as) that Imam Hasan divorced a lot, and had up to 90 wives. (Suyuti) [This report has no isnāds]

Abu Talib Makki (d. 386 AH/996 AD), author of Qut al-Qulub, repeated the allegation that Imam Hasan (as) divorced a lot.

‘After a thorough study of these reports, I have found that the first man known to accuse Imam Hasan of "marrying and divorcing" was the 2nd Abbasid Khalifa, Mansur, who because of his dynastic policies was bent upon belittling Amir al-Mu'minin `Ali and his descendants. […] For this purpose, he gave a public address after that mass arrest, in which he shamelessly said: "By God, we left the descendants of Abu Talib and the Khilafat; we did not interfere at all. `Ali ibn Abi Talib became Khalifa. After him Hasan ibn `Ali became Khalifa. By God, he did not deserve it. He was offered money, which he accepted; Mu'awiya sent him a message that he would make him his successor. So, Hasan abdicated the Khilafat and left the government and power. He left everything to Mu'awiya, and turned his attention, to women, marrying one woman today, divorcing another one tomorrow. He remained like this till he died in his bed."

(AI-Mas'udi; in Muruj al-Dhahab, Vol.3, p.226).’ (Sayyed Saeed Akhtar Rizvi, Imam Hasan 'The Myth of his Divorces', Al-Serat, Vol 4 (1978), No 3). 

http://www.al-islam.org/al-serat/imamhasan.htm

He actually only had three wives, the last of which poisoned him, at the request of Yazid ibn Mu’awiya (See Suyuti again)