Muslims

Muslims (Arabic: مُسلِم‎) are people who follow or practice Islam, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion. Muslims consider the Quran, their holy book, to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to the Islamic prophet and messenger Muhammad, may peace be upon him and his family. Muslims also generally follow the teachings and practices of Muhammad (sunnah). Those who obtain these teachings primarily from his Companions (sahaba) are called Sunni, and those who take them from his family (ahl al-bayt) are called the Shi'a.

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A general view is: It is allowed for a person living in a Muslim-majority society to emigrate to a non-Muslim society as long as it does not cause one to lose one's religion.

Beyond that, if a Muslim emigrates to the West, it is a personal decision whether or not they decide on focusing on building infrastructures in the West, or focus on going back to their country of origin. Not everyone has the same circumstances or the same role in life. Some people will work effectively in one country but not another. So it isn't the sort of thing one can say there is only one answer to. 

A more detailed view:

If someone has no choice and must emigrate for some reason, then obviously it is allowed; questions of permissibility are only for things that are by choice. Usually emigration is due to some need, such as for economic or political reasons, and not a straightforward choice.

The entire earth belongs to Allah. One of the ways that Allah directs us to one geographical location or another is through rizq - that is, making it difficult for us to live in one place and giving us employment or opportunities in another - and this is part of the divine plan.

Additionally, in reality, few (if any) Muslim-majority societies are currently embracing all the major values of Islam, such as social justice, absence of corruption, supporting the deprived, racial equality, and other things. We all know that in some Muslim-majority societies, there is also a problem with sectarian violence or sectarian restrictions.

Furthermore, in some Muslim-majority societies, Islamic practice has been restricted (such as limitations on or a bias against wearing the hijab).

So it may be overly simplistic to divide the world into "Muslim societies" and "non-Muslim societies".

However, one might surmise there are still some cultural factors in Muslim-majority societies that support a person's faith, or help in passing it on to children, such as being around mosques, seeing Islam as a normalized as part of daily life, less public alcohol consumption, and these  sorts of things. 

Anyway, yes, it seems like a good idea for Muslims to build permanent infrastructures in the West since many Muslims live in the West.

One can also note that Islam did not spread to today's "Muslim world" overnight. One major reason for the spread of Islam was the migration of individual Muslims to various places, and their their establishment of mosques and other institutions. So building Islamic institutions in the West is not something new or different, rather, it is just the same sort of thing that happened before. Sometimes there is a mental image that the Muslim-majority world was always that way, but that is obviously not the case on a historical level.

Note: There is an underlying assumption between this statement that all Muslims in the West come from, or have ancestry in, other countries. This assumption should be challenged. Not all Muslims in the West were born in other countries. Many Muslims in the West were born in the West and cannot easily return to the country of their ancestors, or they may be of mixed ancestry and not have a specific country to go do that is "theirs".

Also, not all Muslims in the West trace their ancestry to non-Western countries, so they do not have another country to go back to. (While some Western Muslims have attempted "hijra" to the Muslim-majority world, there are usually barriers along the lines of residency permits, work permits, being treated perpetually like an outsider, etc.)

I suspect that the migration of Muslims to the West is part of Allah's plan and perhaps Allah wishes to end the "clash of civilizations" between Islam and the West and create more interchange. Also, having a significant number of Muslims in the West has sparked some important discussions about Islam, Islamic law, inter-faith relations, and other matters due to the situation of Islam being in a new environment. This helps to have growth in Muslim thought rather than stagnation. So one can see there have been some benefits overall for the ummah to having a large number of Muslims, and Muslim institutions, in the West. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 12 months ago

Yes it is allowed according to authentic evidence from Quran and Hadeeth from the Prophet (SAWA) and Ahlul Bayt (AS) being studied and researched by Shia scholars. 
Non Shia Muslims have little access to the most authentic Prophetic Hadeeths narrated by Ahlul Bayt (AS) , that is why many of them have misunderstood narrations and matters including this matter as well as Wudhu, temporary marriage, Divorce, daughters inheritance, photography etc. 

Wassalam.

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 12 months ago

Yes.

Shi'i Muslims do not accept the prohibition on it found in some Sunni sources. They also do not see these things as "changing the creation of Allah" which is condemned as an act of Shatan in Qur'an 4:119.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Both are required depending on your surroundings. If you are living among Muslims who need to be nurtured to be better Muslims, you should then focus on that. If you are living among non Muslims who do not know enough about the facts of Islam being the last and final message to all human beings, you need to try to enlighten them and help them know the facts then leave to them to think and decide. No doubt, the reward of enlightening non Muslims is very great, nevertheless,BT he reward if nurturing Muslims to make them better Muslims is also very great.

You can do both as our Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) and his great successors the infallible Imams did. It depends on the need of your surroundings and your abilities.

'Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 1 year ago

It is generally held that, immediately prior to Islam, there was a lunar calendar in use in Mecca and Medina with twelve months and seven days per week; however, extra days were added each year so that it would match the solar calendar instead of being shorter than it (so the months would not move around the solar year). The Prophet (S) made the lunar calendar strictly lunar (without any extra days). 

Additionally, years were referred to by events (such as "aam al-fil", or the Year of the Elephant), and this continued during the lifetime of the Prophet (S).

It generally held that, during the caliphate of 'Umar, at the suggestion of Imam 'Ali (A), the decision was made to count the years in the Islamic calendar beginning with the hijrah, instead of referring to the years by important events that happened to them, to make things easier for the expanding bureaucracy of the Arab-Muslim Empire, and thus it became the hijri calendar as we know it today. Some people hold that the Prophet (S) himself mandated the first year of the Islamic calendar be the year of migration, but this view is not very common. 

Anyway, calendars can be quite complicated - people today often take them for granted because we have digital devices and communication by which we can all agree on the date and time, but for much of human history, it was a big challenge and responsibility to keep up with the calendar!

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Allah (SWT) created all creatures and He provides all of them whether they believe and obey Him or not. That is from His Great Mercy. Some believers suffer from poverty because of injustice of oppressors or any other reason. Poverty can also in certain cases be a test to purify the believer or elevate his degree.

Poverty is not degradation  and wealth is not an honor. Both are tests.

Many enemies of Allah were granted wealth like Firaon ( Pharaoh) and Hamaan and  Qaroun (Korah) while many Prophets were tested by poverty and illness like Prophet Ayyub (AS).

Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 1 year ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Please see the short video below where I answer this question more generally:

https://youtu.be/srNsJ_0dRow

May you always be successful

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

The best response can be from Muslims in France by practicing the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad in their life and with their neighbours. That will show people the real teachings of Islam and will give practical evidence that the cartoonist is wrong.

Muslims in the world should not give business and profit to those who attack Islam and Muslims.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The obligatory daily prayers for all Muslims are the same times: Fajr, Dhuhr, 'Asr, Maghreb, 'Isha`. 

The timing for these prayers are extremely similar for all Islamic schools of thought at as well. The point of difference as far as timing is in two aspects:

1. 'Asr,

2. 'Isha`.

The difference here is that in the Ja'fari fiqhi view, the timing for these two prayers is not as distant away from Dhuhr and Maghreb as the Sunni fiqhi view states.

In fact, for 'Asr and 'Isha`, one is able to pray them once their finish the previous salat. Yes, it is recommended to pray nawafil, and do duas, etc, between Dhuhr and 'Asr, and Maghreb and 'Isha`, but these are not obligatory to do. 

So, basically, from the Shi'i perspective, it is permissible to join Dhuhr and 'Asr, and Maghreb and 'Isha`, and pray them one after the other.

In Sunni jurisprudence, this is not prohibited as well. One Sunni view is that this can be done only when travelling, with a valid excuse or in emergencies. Another Sunni view is that it can be done with a valid excuse or without.

We do know that in Sunni hadith books, there are numerous authenticated hadiths that mention the holy Prophet (s.a.w.) joined these prayers together and prayed them one after the other, without any excuse. 

Therefore, what the Shi'a do in combining between these two prayers is not something heretical or far fetched, or bad. Each madhhab is entitled to have their own jurisprudential view on certain things, especially when we see that there are many Sunni scholars who also approve of it as well. 

And Allah knows best.

 

 

 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Yes, Alawites are Muslims like all other Muslim sects.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 1 year ago

This matter has different opinions among the  Maraaji' of Taqleed who are the highest in Islamic knowledge. Many of them e.g. Ayatullah Sistani and Ayatullah Sayyed Sa'eed al-Hakeem say that non Muslims are not allowed to enter Masjid according to obligatory precaution but they are allowed to inter all other religious places like Islamic centers and Husainiyya and Imam bargah etc.

'Other Scholars e.g. Ayatullah Kho'ee and Ayatullah Waheed Khurasani say that non Muslims are allowed to enter usual Masjids "except Masjid al-Haraam " if they don't carry with them any item which can make the Masjid Najis.

Wassalam.

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Mateen Charbonneau, Sheikh Mateen Joshua Charbonneau achieved a certificate from Harvard University in Islamic Studies. He undertook Howza classes under esteemed scholars since 2013 and has been teaching at Imam Mahdi... Answered 1 year ago

There is a very beneficial video series about the topic here:

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD2F0DFA18BFBD747