Eid al-Adha

110181

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

In Islam, we are allowed to work to earn livelihood for us and our family all around the year. We are not like some communities who think that working in certain days is not allowed.

Working on the day of Eid, every Eid including Eid-ul-Fitr, Eidul Adha, Eid al-Ghadeer which is greatest Eid in Islam is permitted and the money earned is allowed. Even working on Friday is allowed except when the call for Friday Prayer is declared, we have to leave trade and business and go to join the Friday Prayer. Working on Friday before and after Friday Prayers is allowed.

It is Makrouh (Disliked) to work on Ashura being the day of the greatest tragedy in Islam, and we know that Makrouh is disliked but not Haraam.

Wassalam.

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

There is no fiqhi problem with working on a Eid day. The income you earned for the day would also be halal.

However, it would be ideal that a Muslim devotes such days to worship, doing the mustahab things for Eid, and also spending it with family and kin. 

And Allah knows best.

82473

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 1 year ago

Most people eat animals. In fact all of nature is about eating. If you look outside, all you see is one thing eating another thing, from the birds to the insects to the mice to the cats to the fish and everything else. Lots and lots of eating!

It is really hard to comment on the will of animals. Obviously animals have a survival instinct which makes them dislike being killed. However, most farm animals would not exist at all if people hadn't taken the effort to breed them and raise them.

What can be said is that it is allowed for people to eat animals as long as they are treated and slaughtered in the right way, although some people may choose not to.

The "sacrifice" here is about sacrificing the time, money, and effort it takes to raise an animal (or, if it is purchased, to pay for that) and then giving away a good amount of it. In times where people had very limited food options, or in places where many people don't have access to healthy food, this is a big service to other people. It is one thing to advocate being a vegetarian in a place with many food options and where you can eat a healthy diet without meat or animal products, and a different thing when not eating animals can lead to malnutrition.

(This is as opposed to some older religious traditions where sacrificing an animal for deities or other beings was said to offer things that were useful for them such as blood; the Quran clarifies that God, as pure divinity, does not receive the meat or blood but rather acknowledges the sense of sacrifice.)

Sometimes these questions come up because some people look down on Muslims for being barbaric. However I would point out that in the United States, almost everyone considers it traditional to eat a turkey on Thanksgiving, and eating it requires slaughtering it, and sometimes homeless shelters also serve turkey to those in need, yet it is rare to hear people comment on that or treat it as backwards. 

81786

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Qurbani is not obligatory but only in Hajj. You can spend whatever you want in Qurbani as a highly recommended worship.

Wassalam.

81282

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Qurbani is compulsory on pilgrims during Hajj but recommended for those who are not in Hajj.

Wassalam.

76148

Seyed Saied Alavi, Seyed Saied Alavi is a researcher based in Qom who has studied from the Howzah of Qom and also completed a Pastoral studies program. He is currently a university lecturer in the fields of Shia... Answered 1 year ago

In the name of Allah

Considering the obligatory Qurbani (sacrificing sheep, goat, etc.) for a Haji (Pilgram to Makkah) in the Hajj al-Tamattu on the Day of Eid al-Adha, every Haji should offer One Qurbani and not less. so sharing it with another Haji won't work.

However, for a Mustahab (recommended) Qurbani, any number of people can contribute and share the Thawab of one Qurbani.

WasSalaam.

56534

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 1 year ago

as salam alaikum

the holy Qur'an says: "We have made the sacrifical animals among the symbols appointed by Allah for you. They are of immense good for you. So in the name of Allah stand in lines. When their flanks collapse eat from them and feed him who is contented and him who begs. In these way We have made this subservient to you so that you may render thanks" (22:36).

It is correct to say that the sacrifice of Eid al-Adha includes killing the ego and obey Allah. Since the order of sacrifice has been given by Allah in this regard, Muslims around the world travel thousands of miles to reach Mecca and perform the rites of Hajj, spending their money, time and energy. 

The meat should be divided between rich and poor and this is also a noble act.

With prayers for your success.

56349

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 years ago

It is in fact a practice to kill our own ego through sacrificing animals which we own to feed the poor for the sake of Allah.

Wassalam.