Table of Contents

The Detailed List of the Narrators

The First List

They are those who witnessed the battle [at Karbala’] and narrated it directly to Abu Mikhnaf. They are:

1. Thabit bin Hubairah. He related the death of ‘Amru bin QaraZah bin Ka’b al-Ansari and the report about his brother, ‘Ali bin QaraZah (See al-Tabari: 5:434).

He has this report only. We have not found any mention of him in the books of rijal. The actual text of the the Maqtal regarding his report reads as follows: “Abu Mikhnaf says: [I narrate] from Thabit bin Hubairah who said: ‘Then ‘Amru bin QaraZah bin Ka’b was killed…’”

[The manner in which] the report [has been narrated] implies that [Abu Mikhnaf] related it directly from [him].

2. Yahya bin Hani’ bin ‘Urwah al-Muradi al-Madhhiji. He related the martyrdom of Nafi’ bin Hilal al-Jamali. The text reads: “Yahya has narrated to me… that Nafi’…” This is very clear in that it was a direct report. (See al-Tabari: 5:435)

His mother was Raw’ah, daughter of Hajjaj al-Zubaidiyy and the sister of ‘Amru bin al-Hajjaj al-Zubaidiyy. Thus, [‘Amru] is the uncle of Yahya from the mother’s side. (5:363)

Yahya was present in Karbala’ together with his uncle in the army of ‘Umar bin Sa’d. He has narrated the martyrdom of Nafi’ bin Hilal al-Jamali. [Yahya] heard his uncle ‘Amru bin al-Hajjaj al-Zubaidiyy stopping the army of [Ibn Sa‘d] from engaging in single combat [with the companions of al-Husayn (as)] after the martyrdom of Nafi’ bin Hilal, suggesting to them, instead, to throw stones at al-Husayn (as) and his companions. Yet, he did not part from his uncle. (5:435)

He also related what his uncle told ‘Abdullah bin al-Muti’ al-‘Adawi, the governer of Ibn al-Zubair in Kufah, that he should stand firm in fighting Mukhtar bin Abi ‘Ubaid al-Thaqafi. Yahya was along side his uncle in his combat against Mukhtar. (6:28)

Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. Al-Darqutni says that his [word] can be taken as a proof. According to al-Nassai, he is reliable. Abu Hatim adds that he was pious and among the chiefs in Kufah. Shu’bah says that he was a leader of the people of Kufah, as reported in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib.

3. Zuhair bin ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Zuhair al-Khath’ami. He narrated the martyrdom of Suwaid bim ‘Amru bim Abi Muta’ al-Khath’ami. The text says: “…has related to me saying…” (5:446).

This is his only report. We have not found any mention of him in the books of rijal.

The Second List

Those who witnessed the battle and from whom Abu Mikhnaf narrates through one or two links. They are:

1. ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an1. He related the arrival of al-Husayn (as) at Karbala’ and the letter of Ibn Ziyad to Hurr in this regard (al-Tabari: 5:407). [Abu Mikhnaf narrates from him] through one intermediary.

2. Hani’ bin Thubait al-Hadhrami al-Sakuni. He narrated Ibn Sa‘d’s meeting with Imam al-Husayn (as) at a point between the two camps after the arrival of the Imam (as) at Karbala’ and before the day of ‘Ashura’. The text says: “Abu Janab has narrated to me from Hani’ …”

He witnessed the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as) (al-Tabari:5:413). He participated in the killing of ‘Abdullah bin ‘Umair al-Kalbi -the second person to be martyred from the companions of al-Husayn (as) (5:436), and in the killing of ‘Abdullah bin ‘Ali bin Abi Talib (as), Ja’far bin ‘Ali (as), a lad from the household of al-Husayn (5:448) and ‘Abdullah bin al-Husayn bin ‘Ali (as) whose mother was Rabab, daughter of Imru’ al-Qais al-Kalbi (5:468).

3. Humaid bin Muslim al-Azdi. He reported the following:

Ibn Ziyad’s letter to Ibn Sa‘d, instructing him to prevent al-Husayn (as) and his companions from getting water; the endeavour of ‘Abbas (as) to get water on the seventh night [of Muharram] (5:412); the dispatch of Shamir to Karbala’ (5:414); the beginning of the battle (5:429); [al-Husayn’s] words to Shamir when he [intended to] attack the tents just before the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as); the noon prayers; the martyrdom of Habib bin MuZahir al-Asadi (5:439); the words of the Imam (as) at the martyrdom of his son ‘Ali (as); the coming out of [Lady] Zainab at the martyrdom of al-Husayn; the martyrdom of Qasim bin al-Husayn (as); the martyrdom of ‘Abdullah bin al-Husayn (as) in [al-Husayn’s] lap (5:446-448); the state of al-Husayn (as) after the martyrdom of his companions till his own martyrdom (5:451&452); the difference [of opinion] within the [enemy’s] camp after [al-Husayn’s] martyrdom regarding killing his son ‘Ali (as); the story of ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an and his release; the trampling of the horses on the body of al-Husayn (as); the carrying of the head of the Imam (as) to Ibn Ziyad by [Humaid] and Khauliyy bin Yazid al-Asbahi (5:455); ‘Umar bin Sa‘d’s sending of [Humaid] to his family members to inform them that he was in safety; the prisoners in the court of Ibn Ziyad and his hitting al-Husayn’s lips with a cane; the incident of Zayd bin Arqam narrating to him the tradition of the Messenger of Allah (S) and the reply of Ibn Ziyadh to him; the remarks of Zayd about Ibn Ziyad; Zainab’s entering the court of Ibn Ziyad, his words to her and her answer; Ibn Ziyad’s attempt to beat her and the comments of ‘Amru bin Huraith; the words of Ibn Ziyad to Imam Zain al-‘Abidin (as) and his reply; the attempt to kill him and his aunt’s clinging to him; and [finally] Ibn Ziyad’s sermon in the mosque and Ibn ‘Afif’s reply to him and his murder (al-Tabari:5:456-459).

The person from whom Humaid narrated these reports was Sulaiman bin Abi Rashid.

It is noticed that Abu Mikhnaf brings in incomplete reports [from Humaid] and narrates [only] those parts which are relevant to the occasion in hand. It is also evident that [Humaid’s] reports begin with the dispatch of Shamir to Karbala’ and end with reports about [what transpired in] the court of Ibn Ziyad and the murder of Ibn ‘Afif al-Azdi.

This implies that Humaid was in the army of Shamir bin Dhi al-Jaushan al-Kilabi, especially after taking into consideration his constant conversation with Shamir, censuring him in a number of matters; and [secondly] his presence in the tents after the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as), knowing that it was Shamir who attacked the tents with the foot soldiers.

Later, we see [Humaid] participating in the uprising of the Tawwabun (5:555). He used to visit Mukhtar in prison, but [at the same time] he cautioned Sulaiman bin Surad al-Khuza’i against him, informing him that Mukhtar was inciting people to betray him. [However,] Sulaiman ignored this action of [Mukhtar] (5:581&584). [Humaid] later returned with the defeated army of the Tawwabun (5:606). He was a friend of Ibrahim bin al-Ashtar al-Nakha’i whom he used to frequently visit and go with him to [see] Mukhtar every evening–after the Tawwabun uprising. They would plan their affairs till late night and then disperse (6:18). One Monday evening Humaid came out with Ibrahim from his house with a group of about a hundred [men]. They were armed with swords and were concealing their shields under their cloak-like garments (6:19). They advanced till they came to the house of Mukhtar on the night he departed. (6:23)

However, when [Humaid] came to know that Mukhtar is determined to kill the assasins of al-Husayn (as), he rose together with ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Mikhnaf al-Azdi, Abu Mikhnaf’s uncle, against Mukhtar. When ‘Abd al-Rahman was wounded, Humaid recited some verses in sympathy for him (6:51). When ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Mikhnaf escaped from Kufah and sought refuge with Mus’ab bin al-Zubair in Basrah, Humaid also joined him there (6:58)!

His name last appears in al-Tabari (6:213) when he recited couplets in lamentation of ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Mikhnaf who was killed by the [followers of the] Azariqah [sect from the] Khawarij near Kazarun in 75 H, as he was fighting them along with Muhallab bin Safrah on behalf of Hajjaj bin Yusuf al-Thaqafi.

Al-Dhahabi has mentioned [Humaid] in Mizan al-I’tidal (1:616) and so has Ibn Qudamah in al-Mughni (1:195).

4. Dahhak bin ‘Abdillah al-Mushriqi al-Hamdani. He narrated the reports about the night and the day of ‘Ashura’; al-Husayn’s preparation for the battle; and his important speech on the day of ‘Ashura’. (al-Tabari:5:418, 419, 421, 423, 425 & 444)

Abu Mikhnaf relates from this person on the authority of ‘Abdullah bin ‘Asim al-Faishi al-Hamdani -who was also from the [Banu] Hamdan- that he [i.e. Dahhak] laid a condition before Imam al-Husayn (as) that he would be free to leave him in case [all] his companions were killed, and the Imam (as) accepted it! Accordingly, he fled the battlefield. (5:418&444)

Al-Tusi mentions him in his Rijal among the companions of Imam Zain al-‘Abidin (as)!

5. Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as). [Abu Mikhnaf] narrates from him the report about the events of the night of ‘Ashura’ through two intermediaries. They are:

(a) Harith bin Hasirah, who was narrating from ‘Abdullah bin Sharik al-‘Amiri, who narrated from [al-Sajjad (as)] (al-Tabari:5:418).

(b) Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi al-Azdi al-Kufi and Abu al-Dahhak [al-Basri], both of whom were narrating from [al-Sajjad (as)] (al-Tabari:5:420).

6. ‘Amru al-Hadhrami. He narrated the joining of [fresh] troops to the army of ‘Umar bin Sa‘d (al-Tabari:5:422) through two links. The identity of this person is not known.

7. A servant of ‘Abd al-Rahman bin ‘Abd Rabbih al-Ansari. Abu Mikhnaf reports his joking with Burair bin Khudhair al-Hamdani through two links, namely: ‘Amru bin Murrah al-Jamali who narrated from Abu Salih al-Hanafi, who in turn related from this servant. The report ended saying: “When I saw that the people had been defeated, I escaped and left them” (al-Tabari:5:421&422).

8. Masruq bin Wail al-Hadhrami. [Abu Mikhnaf related from him] the story of Ibn Hawzah at the beginning of the battle through two intermediaries, ‘Ata’ bin al-Sa’ib who narrated it from Abd al-Jabbar bin Wail al-Hadhrami, who in turn reported [Masruq] as saying: “I was in the front line of the cavalry that marched against al-Husayn… so that I may obtain the head of al-Husayn which would gain me some position in the eyes ‘Ubaidullah bin Ziyad… Masruq then returned… and said: ‘Verily, I have seen something in the people of this house that I will never fight them [again]’.” (al-Tabari:5:421)

9. Kathir bin ‘Abdullah al-Sha’bi al-Hamdani. Abu Mikhnaf relates from him the speech of Zuhair bin al-Qain through ‘Ali bin HanZalah bin As’ad al-Shabami who was narrating from one of his kinsmen called Kathir bin ‘Abdullah al-Sha’bi who had happened to witness the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as) (al-Tabari:5:426).

Tabari narrates from ‘Awanah on the authority of Hisham that: “[Al-Sha’bi] was a brave knight whom nothing would cause to turn his face away from the battle. When ‘Umar bin Sa‘d asked the leaders [who had written letters to al-Husayn (as) from Kufah] to go to al-Husayn (as) and inquire from him why he has come and what does he want, “All of them refused and expressed their dislike for that. Kathir bin ‘Abdullah al-Sha’bi stood up and said: ‘I will go to him. By Allah, if you wish I can [even] assassinate him!…So he went to him… [Abu Thumamah] came forward and said to him: ‘Put down your sword.’ He said: ‘Nay by Allah, there is no honour [for you]!’… Then they cursed each other” (5:410). “[Kathir] and Muhajir bin Aws launched a violent attack on Zuhair bin al-Qain al-Bajali and killed him.” (5:441).

10. Al-Zubaidiyy. He reported the second attack (al-Tabari:5:435). This man, who was from the tribe of Zubaid in Yemen, used to narrate the [so called] glorious deeds of his tribal leader, ‘Amru bin al-Hajjaj al-Zubaidiyy!

11. Ayyub bin Mashrah al-Khayawani. He reported the command of al-Kalbi. He was the one who lamed the horse of Hurr [al-Riyahi]. Later his people accused him of killing Hurr, so he said: “Nay by Allah, I did not kill him. Rather, someone other than me killed him. I would not like to have killed him.” His father, Abu al-Waddak Jabr bin Nauf al-Hamdani asked him: “Why are you not pleased to be the one who killed him?’ He replied: “They claimed that he was among the pious men. By Allah, if he was a sinner, then I would [still] prefer to meet Allah with the sin of wounding [him] than to meet Him with the sin of killing one of them!” Abu al-Waddak said: “You are not going to meet Allah except with the sin of killing all of them… all of you have a share in [spilling] their blood.” (al-Tabari:5:437).

12. ‘Afif bin Zuhair bin Abi al-Akhnas. He reported the martyrdom of Burair bin Khudhair al-Hamdani (r). He was [also] among those who witnessed the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as). He says in this report: “Burair used to teach them the Qur’an in the central mosque of Kufah” (al-Tabari:5:431).

13. Rabi’ bin Tamim al-Hamdani. He reported the martyrdom of ‘Abis bin Abi Shabib al-Shakiri. He was one of those who witnessed that day [i.e. the day of ‘Ashura’] (al-Tabari:5:444).

14. ‘Abdullah bin ‘Ammar al-Bariqi. He reported the state of al-Husayn (as) when attacking the people. He was among those who witnessed the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as) and was [later] reproached for witnessing it. [But] he replied: “Indeed the Banu Hashim are obliged to me for a favour!! So we asked him: “What favour did you do them?” He said: “I attacked al-Husayn with a lance, then I drew closer to him… then I quickly distanced myself from him!” (al-Tabari:5:451).

15. Qurrah bin Qais al-HanZali al-Tamimi. He reported the severing of the heads and about the captives (al-Tabari:5:455). He had come out under Hurr bin Yazid al-Riyahi al-Tamimi -a commander from his tribe, in the vanguard of Ibn Ziyad against al-Husayn (as) (5:427).

[Qurrah] is the one whom Ibn Sa‘d had sent to al-Husayn (as) to ask him the reason he came out [from Madinah] and what he wanted. When he came to al-Husayn (as), Habib bin MuZahir al-Asadi invited him to help al-Husayn (as) but he declined (5:411). He is [also] the one who says that Hurr said to him: “Do not you want to water your horse?” and then Hurr moved away from him until he made his way to al-Husayn (as). [Qurrah] later used to say that had Hurr informed him of his intentions, he would have gone with him to al-Husayn (as)! (5:427).

These are the fifteen people who witnessed the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as) and from whom Abu Mikhnaf has narrated [reports], either through one or two intermediaries.

The Third List

These are those who were in direct contact with the events [that surrounded the movement of al-Husayn (as)] and directly related them to Abu Mikhnaf. They are:

1. Abu Janab Yahya bin Abi Hayyah al-Wada’i al-Kalbi. He has reported the following: the encounter of the companions of Muslim with Ibn Ziyad (al-Tabari:5:369&370); the dispatch of the heads of Muslim and Hani’ by Ibn Ziyad to Yazid and his letter to him in this regard (5:380).

The editor of this work says: It seems to me that [Abu Janab] was relating these reports from his brother, Hani’ bin Abi Hayyah, since he was the one whom Ibn Ziyad sent with his letter.

Al-Tabari has narrated 23 reports from him. Nine of them are concerning the battles of Jamal, Siffin and Nahrawan, all through some links. [The other] nine are regarding Karbala’, five of which have been transmitted indirectly and another three through an incomplete chain of narration (irsal).

He is mentioned last in al-Tabari as relating -through an incomplete chain of narration- the letter of Mus’ab bin al-Zubair to Ibrahim bin al-Ashtar in the year 67 H and after the death of Mukhtar, inviting him to support him. (6:111)

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (11:201) mentions his biography and says: “A truthful person from Kufah who died in 147 H.”

Therefore, we conclude, from the above citation, that he was not in direct contact with the events.

2. Ja’far bin Hudhaifah al-Tai. He reports the following: the letter of Muslim [bin ‘Aqil] to al-Husayn (as) before the former’s martyrdom, informing him of the allegiance of the people of Kufah [to him]; and the letter of Muhammad bin al-Ash’ath bin Qais al-Kindi to Imam al-Husayn (as) through Ayas bin al-‘Athal al-Tai, informing him of the arrest and murder of Muslim bin ‘Aqil (al-Tabari:5:375).

Al-Dhahabi mentions [Ja’far] in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “He related [reports] from ‘Ali, and Abu Mikhnaf narrated from him. [Ja’far] was with ‘Ali at Siffin. Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat and says: “It is not known who he is.”

Al-Tabari has narrated five reports from him. Two reports about Siffin and other two concerning the Khawarij from Tay’ and [the fifth one is] the report [mentioned above].

3. Dulham bint ‘Amru, the wife of Zuhair bin al-Qain. She reported the joining [of Zuhair] with al-Husayn (as). The text reads: “Abu Mikhnaf says: ‘Dulham has related to me that… She said: ‘So I said to [Zuhair]…” (al-Tabari:5:396).

4. ‘Uqbah bin Abi al-‘Aizar. He narrated: the two sermons of the Imam (as) at al-Baidhah and Dhu Husam; the reply of Zuhair bin al-Qain to the Imam (as); and the verses [recited] by the Imam (as) and Tirimmah bin ‘Adiyy (al-Tabari:5:403). It seems he was among the companions of Hurr and was saved. We have found no mention of him in our works of rijal. The author of Lisan al-Mizan mentions him and says: “His narrations are reliable. Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat.”2

These were the four [people] who were in direct contact with the happenings and they, apparently, narrated them directly to Abu Mikhnaf.

The Fourth List

They are those who were either in direct contact with the events, or they belonged to the same period and thus reported them. Abu Mikhnaf narrates [reports] from them through one or two links. They are:

1. Abu Sa’id Dinar, or Kaisan, or ‘Aqisa al-Maqbari. He reported the verses [recited] by al-Husayn (as) when he was leaving Madinah through one intermediary, namely ‘Abd al-Malik bin Naufal bin Musahiq bin Makhramah (al-Tabari:5:342).

Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “He and his father were the companions of Abu Hurairah. He is reliable and an authority (hujjah). He [lived and] became very old, but was not deranged… He died in 125 H. He was a supporter of the Banu Tamim. Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. According to al-Hakim, he is reliable and trustworthy.”3

According to Tahdhib al-Tahdhib, al-Waqidi says: “He is reliable and a prolific narrator. He died in 100 H. Some say that [he died] during the rule of Walid bin ‘Abd al-Malik. It is said that ‘Umar had put him in charge of digging graves. So he used to live in the graveyard area and thus came to be known as ‘al-Maqbari’.”4

Shaikh al-Tusi mentions him in his Rijal among the companions of ‘Ali and al-Husayn (as), [but] by the name of Dinar. His agnomen was Abu Sa’id and his title ‘Aqisa. He was given this title because of a poem he had recited.5

Ibn Qudamah says in al-Mughni: “He is al-Maqdisi, from al-Maqdis, the city of Prophet «liya.”

Al-Saduq narrates in his Amali through a chain of narration going back to Abu Sa’id ‘Aqisa who said: “[I relate] from al-Husayn who was reporting from his father, who narrated the Prophet (S) saying to him: “O ‘Ali! You are my brother and I am your brother. I have been chosen for the prophethood (nubuwwah) while you have been selected for the divine leadership (imamah). [O ‘Ali] I am the bearer of revelation (tanzil) and you are [responsible] for its interpretation (ta’wil). You and I are the [two] fathers of this Ummah. You are my trustee, successor, vizier, inheritor and the father of my offspring. Your followers (shi’atuka) are my followers.”

2. ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an. He narrated the following: the departure of the Imam (as) from Madinah; his meeting with ‘Abdullah bin Muti’ al-‘Adawi; his arrival in Makkah (al-Tabari:5:351); the conversation of Ibn ‘Abbas and Ibn al-Zubair with the Imam (as) when he was leaving Makkah (5:383); the report about the messengers of ‘Amru bin Sa’id al-‘As al-Ashdaq, the then governer of Makkah, to al-Husayn (as), asking him to return to Makkah; the report on the Yemeni dye (waras) at Tan’im (5:385); the conversation of ‘Ali bin al-Husayn [al-Akbar] with his father after they left Qasr Banu Muqatil; the arrival of al-Husayn (as) at Nainawa; the coming of the messenger of Ibn Ziyad with his letter to Hurr; al-Husayn’s camping at Nainawa; the arrival of ‘Umar bin Sa‘d (5:407-409); and the proposal of the Imam (as) to Ibn Sa‘d (5:413).

All these reports were related [by Abu Mikhnaf] through one intermediary, namely Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi al-Hamdani. This [also] backs the fact that Abu Mikhnaf used to report only those parts of a report which were relevant to the occasion he was treating (taqti’).

3. Muhammad bin Bishr al-Hamdani. The reports he narrated are: the gathering of the Shi‘ah in Kufah at the house of Sulaiman bin Surad al-Khuza’i after the death of Mu’awiyah; the speech of Sulaiman; their letters to al-Husayn (as); Imam’s reply to them through Muslim bin ‘Aqil (al-Tabari:5:352-353); the letter of Muslim to al-Husayn (as) on his way to Kufah and the latter’s reply to him; Muslim’s arrival in Kufah; the frequent visits of the Shi‘ah to Muslim at the house of Mukhtar (5:354-355); and Ibn Ziyad’s sermon after the martyrdom of Hani’ bin ‘Urwah (5:368).

All these reports were transmitted through one link, namely Hajjaj bin ‘Ali al-Bariqi al-Hamdani.

[Al-Bariqi] was present in the gathering of the Shi‘ah [in Kufah] at the house of Sulaiman bin Surad. He says: “We then mentioned the death of Mu’awiyah and expressed our gratitude to Allah for that. Then Sulaiman bin Surad said to us… then we sent [the two men] with the letter… and ordered them to keep the matter secret… then we sent to him… we waited for two more days and sent [more] letters… and our letters were with them.” (5:354-355).

He was also present in the meeting of the Shi‘ah with Muslim at Mukhtar’s place, but he did not pay allegiance to him out of fear of being killed. Hajjaj bin ‘Ali says [in this regard]: “I said to Muhammad bin Bishr: ‘Did you say anything?’ He replied: ‘Although I wished that may Allah honour my colleagues with victory, I did not want to be killed! I [also] did not want to lie [to Muslim by paying allegiance to him and then abandon him]!” (5:355).

The author of Lisan al-Mizan says that Abu Hatim used to say: “He is Muhammad bin al-Sa’ib al-Kalbi al-Kufi, when his lineage is traced back to his grandfather. Otherwise, he is [known as] Muhammad bin al-Sa’ib bin Bishr.”6

Al-Tusi has mentioned him in his Rijal among the companions of Imam al-Baqir and al-Sadiq (as).7

4. Abu al-Waddak Jabr bin Nauf al-Hamdani. He reported: the speech of Nu’man bin Bashir al-Ansari -the governer of Kufah for Mu’awiyah and Yazid; the letters of the people of Kufah to Yazid (al-Tabari:5:355-356); Ibn Ziyad’s address in Kufah (5:358-359); Muslim’s transfer to the house of Hani’ bin ‘Urwah; the spying of Ma’qal al-Shami on Muslim by the order of Ibn Ziyad; Ibn Ziyad’s visit to Hani’ when he was sick; the proposal of ‘Umarah bin ‘Ubaid al-Saluli to kill Ibn Ziyad; the disagreement of Hani’ about that; Ibn Ziyad’s visit to Sharik bin al-A’war al-Harithi al-Hamdani at Hani’s house and the signal given by Sharik to Muslim to kill Ibn Ziyad; Muslim’s refusal of that due to the disapproval of Hani’; Ibn Ziyad’s call on Hani’, beating and imprisoning him; the arrival of ‘Amru bin al-Hajjaj al-Zubaidiyy with the distinguished men from the Madhhij and their horsemen; and the meeting of Shuraih al-Qadhi with Hani’ and his informing [Hani’s] kinsmen about the latter’s safety (5:361-367).

[Abu Mikhnaf narrated these reports from Abu al-Waddak] through a person called Numair bin Wa’lah al-Hamdani, except for the last report which was through Mua’lla bin Kulaib.

His complete name has appeared in his report about Imam ‘Ali’s speech at Nukhailah after he had lost all hopes in guiding the Khawarij (5:78). It seems that he was in Kufah after the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as). He rebuked Ayyub bin Mashrah al-Khayawani for laming the horse of Hurr, saying: “I am sure that you will meet Allah with the sin of killing all of them. Tell me if you were to shoot at this [person], lame [the mount of] another, and then shoot at some other person, take a position in your combat, attack them and incite your companions against them and increase the number of your people [against them], [you do all this but still] when you are attacked you dislike to flee; [tell me] if the other person from among your companions was to do the same, and so did the third one… then [would not this mean that you and your] companions have killed them?! Indeed, you all have a share in [spilling] their blood!” (5:437).

Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “[He was] the colleague of Abu Sa’id al-Khudhri and well known for his truthfulness.”8

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib says: “Ibn Hibban has brought him in al-Thuqat. Ibn Ma’in says that he is reliable. According to al-Nassa’i, he was pious. He has also narrated [reports] from him in his Sunan.”9

5. Abu ‘Uthman al-Nahdi. He reported: the letter of Imam al-Husayn (as) to the people of Basrah; the appointment of ‘Uthman, Ibn Ziyad’s brother, by Ibn Ziyad as his deputy over Basrah; and Ibn Ziyad’s arrival in Kufah (al-Tabari:5:357-358). [Abu Mikhnaf narrated these reports] through one intermediary, namely Saq’ab bin Zuhair.

Abu ‘Uthman was among the companions of Mukhtar and was appointed by him, upon his arrival in Kufah to see Ibn Muti’, [as the guardian] over the weak people at Sabkhah (5:22&29).

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib mentions him and says that he was from [the tribe of] Qudha’ah and lived during the times of the Prophet (S), though he did not see him. He was residing in Kufah and thereafter went to Basrah after the martyrdom of al-Husayn (as). [Abu ‘Uthman] was in charge of the monthly stipends of his people. He performed hajj and ‘umrah sixty times. He used to spend the night in prayers and fast during the day time. [According to al-Tahdhib,] he was reliable and died in 95 H at the age of one hundred and thirty.10

6. ‘Abdullah bin Khazim al-Kathiri al-Azdi. He narrated, through Yusuf bin Yazid, the uprising of Muslim (as) and the giving of the banners by him (al-Tabari:5:367-368). He also reported the people’s betrayal of Muslim (5:370-371) through Sulaiman bin Abi Rashid.

[‘Abdullah] was among those who paid allegiance to Muslim (as) and was sent by him to inquire about Hani’ [bin ‘Urwah] in the palace [of Ibn Ziyad]. Then he became among those who betrayed Muslim and al-Husayn (as) (5:368-369). Later [‘Abdullah] repented along with the Tawwabun and joined their uprising (5:583) until he was killed (5:601).

7. ‘Abbas -or ‘Ayyash- bin Ja’dah al-Judali. He related: the uprising of Muslim (as) and how the people abandoned him, and the stand of Ibn Ziyad (5:369), through one intermediary by the name of Yunus bin Abi Ishaq al-Subi’i al-Hamdani.

He paid allegiance to Muslim and joined his [attempted] uprising, but thereafter nothing is known about him. He begins his report saying: “We came out with Muslim…”

8. ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Abi ‘Umair al-Thaqafi. He reported the offer made to Mukhtar to come under the safe-conduct granted by Ibn Ziyad.

9. Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi. He narrated: the coming out of Muhammad bin al-Ash’ath against Muslim, the captivity of Muslim, (al-Tabari:5:373) and his request for water at the gate of the palace and [the way it was] granted (5:375).

Al-Tabari names him as Qudamah bin Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi.

The editor of this work says: I have found that Zaidah bin Qudamah, the grandfather of Qudamah bin Sa’id, was the one who was in direct contact with the events in Kufah. With regard his grandson, Qudamah bin Sa’id, Shaikh al-Tusi has mentioned him in the circle of the companions of Imam al-Sadiq (as).11 Therefore, it is more appropriate to put the chain of narrators this way: “Qudamah bin Sa’id narrates from Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi...”

The grandfather of Qudamah was Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi, the chief of the police in Kufah in the year 58 H, under ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Umm al-Hakam al-Thaqafi, the governor of Mu’awiyah bin Abi Sufyan after the Year of Unity (‘am al-jama’ah) (5:310). He was together with ‘Amru bin Huraith when the safe-conduct from ‘Ubaidullah bin Ziyad was made public in Kufah after the uprising of Muslim bin ‘Aqil (as), thus he interceded on behalf of Mukhtar, his cousin (5:570).

[Ibn Qudamah] was the one who took the letter of Mukhtar from the prison of Ibn Ziyad in Kufah to ‘Abdullah bin ‘Umar, the husband of Mukhtar’s sister, Safiyyah bint Abi ‘Ubaid al-Thaqafi, requesting him to intercede with Yazid on his behalf. Accordingly, Ibn Ziyad freed him, but wanted to punish Ibn Qudamah for this action of his, but he fled [the city] until after he was granted protection [from Ibn Ziyad] (5: 571).

[Ibn Qudamah] was among those people of Kufah who paid allegiance to ‘Abdullah bin Muti’ al-‘Adawi, Ibn al-Zubair’s governor in Kufah. Ibn Muti’ sent him in pursuit of Mukhtar, so he informed [Mukhtar] about this but he did not pay heed (6:11). [In fact,] the uprising of Mukhtar in Kufah began from the garden of Zaidah at Sabkhah (6:22). Mukhtar had sent to unseat ‘Umar bin ‘Abd al-Rahman al-Makhzumi, Ibn al-Zubair’s governor in Kufah, and he managed to do so through bribery and threat (6:72).

Later, Zaidah joined ‘Abd al-Malik bin Marwan and fought Mus’ab bin al-Zubair along side with him and managed to kill him at the monastery of the monks, in vengeance of the blood of Mukhtar (6:159). Thereafter, Hajjaj sent him with two thousand men to fight Shabib al-Khariji at Rudbar. He fought him until he was killed [by Shabib] in the year 76 H, while his companions surrounded him [helplessly] (6:246).

Thus, it becomes evident that Qudamah bin Sa’id bin Zaidah from whom Abu Mikhnaf narrates this report [i.e. the one about Muslim], was not in direct contact with the events of Kufah during the uprising of Muslim bin ‘Aqil.

And, perhaps, the chain of narration should read as such: ‘Qudamah bin Sa’id narrated to me from Zaidah bin Qudamah…’; for Zaidah was with ‘Amru bin Huraith as we have seen, so he must have been narrating to his grandson, Qudamah bin Sa’id, the report about Ibn Ziyad’s sending of Muhammad bin Ash’ath to Muslim (as).

10. ‘Umarah bin ‘Uqbah bin Abi Mu’it al-Umawi. He narrated Muslim’s request for water and [the way] he was given the water (al-Tabari:5:375). This report has been related from him by his grandson, Sa’id bin ‘Umarah bin ‘Uqbah.

The author of Taqrib al-Tahdhib says that: “[‘Umarah] was reliable and died in 116 H.”

11. ‘Umar bin ‘Abd al-Rahman bin al-Harith bin Hisham al-Makhzumi. [Abu Mikhnaf] reports from him, through Saq’ab bin al-Zuhair, what he said to Imam al-Husayn (as) as the latter was departing from Makkah (al-Tabari:5:382).

‘Abdullah bin al-Zubair had appointed [‘Umar] as his governor over Kufah during the time of Mukhtar, but the latter drove him away through bribery and threats (6:71). The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib says regarding him: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat and says that he has narrated reports from a group of companions.”12

12. ‘Abdullah bin Sulaim and Mudhri bin al-Mushma’il, who were both from the Banu Asad. They reported: the conversation of Ibn al-Zubair with Imam al-Husayn (as) which took place between the black stone (al-hajar al-aswad) and the door [of the Ka’bah] (al-Tabari:5:384); the meeting of Farazdaq with the Imam (as) (5:386); and the news of the martyrdom of Muslim bin ‘Aqil (as) at Tha’labiyyah (5:397-398). [Abu Mikhnaf narrated these reports from them] through two links: Abu Janab Yahya bin Abi Hayyah al-Wada’i al-Kalbi, who related from ‘Adiyy bin Harmalah al-Asadi.

Both of them had heard Imam’s call for help but did not come to his aid. ‘Abdullah bin Sulaim was alive until the year 77 H (6:295).

13. Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as). He reported: the letter of ‘Abdullah bin Ja’far to Imam al-Husayn (as) which he sent through his two sons, ‘Aun and Muhammad; the letter of ‘Amru bin Sa’id al-Ashdaq to the Imam (as) through his brother, Yahya, and the reply of the Imam (as). [Abu Mikhnaf narrated these reports from Ibn al-Husayn] through one link, Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi (5:387-388).

14. Bakr bin Mus’ab al-Muzni. [Abu Mikhnaf reports from him] the martyrdom of ‘Abdullah bin Yuqtur and the report about what transpired at Zubalah [on the way to Kufah], through Abu ‘Ali al-Ansari (al-Tabari:5:398-399).

The identity of both Bakr and Abu ‘Ali is unknown.

15. Fazariyy. He narrated the report on [how] Zuhair bin al-Qain jouined al-Husayn (as), through al-Suddi. The text reads: “A man from the Banu Fazarah [said]…” (al-Tabari:5:396).

16. Tirimmah bin ‘Adiyy. [Abu Mikhnaf relates a report concerning Tirimmah’s meeting with the Imam (as)] through Jamil bin Marthad al-Ghanawi (al-Tabari:5:406).

He met al-Husayn (as) [on his way to Kufah]. The Imam (as) asked him for help, but he put forward the excuse that he was carrying provision for his family, so the Imam (as) did not stop him. [However,] he could not come to the help of the Imam (as).

Shaikh al-Tusi counts him among the companions of ‘Ali (as) and al-Husayn (as). Al-Mamqani mentions him saying that he was reliable and that he succeeded in [coming back and] helping the Imam (as). He sustained injuries [in Karbala’] but was [later] cured and died after that. [However,] he has not mentioned the source for it.13

17. ‘Amir bin Sharahil bin ‘Abd al-Sha’bi al-Hamdani. [Abu Mikhnaf narrates from him] the report about Qasr Bani Muqatil, through Mujalid bin Sa’id (al-Tabari:5:407).

[‘Amir] was born in 21 H (4:145). His mother was among the prisoners of Jalwala’ in the year 16 H. He and his father were the first to respond to Mukhtar (6:15), and they both testified that Mukhtar was on the right (6:17). Both he and his father came out in the streets of Madain with Mukhtar [and his followers] in the year 67 H (6:91). After the death of Mukhtar, [‘Amir] joined Hajjaj and used to be with him (6:327). In 82 H, he revolted against Hajjaj under ‘Abd al-Rahman bin al-Ash’ath bin Qais al-Kindi (6:350). When the later was defeated, [‘Amir] joined Qutaibah bin Muslim, Hajjaj’s governer over Rayy. [Qutaibah] asked for safe-conduct for him and [accordingly] Hajjaj granted him protection (6:374). He continued to live until he took over the judgeship of Kufah for Yazid bin ‘Abd al-Malik bin Marwan during the time of ‘Umar bin ‘Abd al-‘Aziz, 99-101 H.

He was one of those who abandoned Muslim (as) and al-Husayn (as) and did not accompany the latter. Abu Mikhnaf narrates from him through an incomplete chain of transmission (mursalan). He died suddenly in 104 H in Kufah as reported in al-Kuna wa al-Alqab (2:328). Tabari has related 114 narrations from him in his Tarikh. The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib mentions him and narrates from al-‘Ajali that al-Sha’bi heard narrations from fourty eight companions [of the Prophet (S)] and lived during the time of ‘Ali (as). It has also been said that he died in the year 110 H.14

18. Hassan bin Fa’id bin Bukair al-‘Absi. [Abu Mikhnaf narrates from him] Ibn Sa‘d’s letter to Ibn Ziyad and his reply to the former, through Nadhr bin Salih bin Habib bin Zuhair al-‘Absi. The text reads: “I testify that the letter of ‘Umar bin Sa‘d reached ‘Ubaidullah bin Ziyad and I was with him. [Ibn Ziyad] said…” (al-Tabari:5:411).

[Hassan] was among those who fought Mukhtar and his followers along side Rashid bin Ayas, the head of the bodyguards of ‘Abdullah bin Muti’ al-‘Adawi, Abdullah bin Zubair’s governor in Kufah (6:26). He was with Ibn Muti’ during the siege of the palace [in Kufah] (6:31). He was killed in the outskirts of Kufah in 64 H with the followers of Ibn Muti’ (6:49).

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib writes: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. Regarding the meaning of [the word] al-jibt which has appeared in [verse 51 of] Surat al-Nisa’, al-Bukhari narrates from Shu’bah, who related from Abu Ishaq al-Subi’i, who in turn was reporting from [Hassan], that ‘Umar bin al-Khattab said: ‘Al-jibt means sorcery (sihr).’ Al-Bukhari [then] says: ‘He is counted among the Kufans.’”15

19. Abu ‘Umarah al-‘Absi. [Abu Mikhnaf narrates from him] through Abu Ja’far al-‘Absi: the words of Yahya bin al-Hakam bin al-‘Ass and the report about [what transpired in] the court of Yazid (al-Tabari:5:460-461).

20. Qasim bin Bukhait. He related reports about the heads [of the martyrs] in Damascus; the speech of Yahya bin al-Hakam ibn al-‘Ass, the brother to Marwan; the words of Hind, the wife of Yazid; and the poking of Yazid at the teeth of al-Husayn (as) with a cane. These reports have been narrated from [Qasim] through two links, namely: Abu Hamzah al-Thumali, who reported from ‘Abdullah al-Thumali (5:465).

21. Abu al-Kanud ‘Abd al-Rahman bin ‘Ubaid. [Abu Mikhnaf narrates from him, through Sulaiman bin Rashid, the verses [recited by] Umm Luqman, daughter of ‘Aqil bin Abi Talib (al-Tabari:5:466).

[Abu Kanud] was the governer of Kufah for Ziyad bin Abih (5:246). Later, he became among the followers of Mukhtar and claimed to have killed Shamir (6:53). Tabari has narrated from him nine reports [in his Tarikh] through Abu Mikhnaf, as reported in al-A’lam.

22. Fatimah, daughter of ‘Ali, as Tabari calls her. [Abu Mikhnaf relates from her] what took place in the court of Yazid, through Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi al-Azdi (al-Tabari:5:461-462).

These are twenty one people [with the exception of Zaidah bin Qudamah (no. 9)] who were either in direct contact with the events or were living in that period and [thus] reported them. Abu Mikhnaf narrated [the reports] from them through one or two links.

The Fifth List

These are the intermediary narrators (wasait), who are twenty nine in number.

1. ‘Abd al-Malik bin Naufal bin Masahiq bin ‘Abdullah bin Makhramah. He related the verses of the Imam (as) when he was leaving Madinah, through Abu Sa‘d Sa’id bin Abi Sa’id al-Maqbari (al-Tabari:5:342).

He has [also] narrated, without stating his link, Mu’awiyah’s appointment of Yazid at the time of his death as his heir apparent; the speech of Dahhak bin Qais al-Fihri, the head of Mu’awiyah’s bodyguards and the person in charge of his burial; and the verses recited by Yazid when the messenger brought him the news of his father’s death.

Tabari has narrated fifteen reports from him [in his Tarikh] through Abu Mikhnaf, who was relating from [‘Abd al-Malik], who reported from some other person. Most of these reports are about Ibn al-Zubair’s revolt in Makkah, the revolt of ‘Abdullah bin HanZalah in Madinah, and the event of Harrah.

He related one of these reports from his father, Naufal (5:474), the other from ‘Abdullah bin ‘Urwah (5:478) and the third one from Humaid bin Hamzah, who was among the associates of the Banu Umayyah (5:479). He narrated the other seven reports from Habib bin Karrah, also an associate of the Banu Umayyah and the standard bearer of Marwan bin al-Hakam (5:482&539). His last narration was from Sa’id bin ‘Amru bin Sa’id bin al-‘Ass al-Ashdaq (5:577).

Accordingly, it is highly probable that [‘Abd al-Malik] was narrating the reports about the will of Mu’awiyah and his burial from these associates of the Banu Umayyah, though he does not mention their names.

His father, Naufal bin Musahiq, was at the head of [either] two or five thousand soldiers under the governship of Ibn Muti for Ibn al-Zubair. [In an encounter,] Ibn al-Ashtar al-Nakha’i approached him raising his sword [to kill him], but then he let him go (6:30).

He has been considered as reliable in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (5:428) and [also] in al-Kashif of al-Dhahabi (2:216).

2. Abu Sa’id ‘Aqisa. He narrated from some of his companions the conversation of Imam al-Husayn (as), while he was in the state of ihram, with Ibn al-Zubair inside the Sacred mosque in Makkah. (al-Tabari:5:385).

In the first part of [his book] al-Khulasah, ‘Allamah al-Hilli counts him among the companions of ‘Ali (as).16 Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “He has narrated [reports] from ‘Ali (as).” He then says: “He is reliable and his name was Dinar. He was a Shi‘ah and he died in 125 H.”17

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib writes: “Al-Waqidi says that he was a reliable person and has narrated many reports, and died in 100 H. According to Ibn Sa‘d, he died during the caliphate of Walid bin ‘Abd al-Malik.”

It is said that ‘Umar [bin al-Khattab] had made him in charge of digging graves. According to another view, he used to reside in the cemetery area and thus came to be known as ‘al-Maqbari’ (8:453). This view has appeared in Lisan al-Mizan also (2:422).

3. ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Jundab al-Azdi. He has narrated all his reports from ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an. Tabari has related from him around thirty reports about the battles of Jamal, Siffin, Nahrawan and [reports on the event of] Karbala’, which he narrated from ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an.

[Ibn Jundab] has directly narrated reports about Hajjaj. He fought Shabib, the Khariji, with the army of Hajjaj alongside Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi at Rudbar, in the year 76 H (Al-Tabari:6:244). He was taken as a prisoner and paid allegiance to Shabib out of fear (6:246). [Later,] he returned to Kufah and was present in the city when Hajjaj addressed [the people] with the intention of dispatching an army, for the second time, against Shabib in 77 H (6:262).

Al-Ardabili, quoting from al-Rijal al-Wasit of Astarabadi, counts [‘Abd al-Rahman] among the companions of ‘Ali (as).18 Al-‘Asqalani mentions him in Lisan al-Mizan and says: “He has narrated [reports] from Kumail bin Ziyad, and Abu Hamzah al-Thumali has reported from him.”19

4. Hajjaj bin ‘Ali al-Bariqi al-Hamdani. He has narrated all his reports from Muhammad bin Bishr al-Hamdani (see the fourth list, no.3). Of the reports that Tabari has related from him [in his Tarikh], none of his reports are from other than Ibn Bishr. The author of Lisan al-Mizan mentions him and says: “A great personality (shaikh) from whom Abu Mikhnaf has narrated.”20

5. Numair bin Wa’lah al-Hamdani al-Yana’i. He narrated [reports] from Abu al-Waddak Jabr bin Nauf al-Hamdani, Ayyub bin Mashrah al-Khayawani and Rabi’ bin Tamim al-Hamdani.

Tabari has narrated ten reports from him [in his Tarikh], the last of which is from al-Sha’bi about Hajjaj’s court in the year 80 H (al-Tabari:6:328).

Al-‘Asqalani mentions him in Lisan al-Mizan saying: “He has narrated [reports] from al-Sha’bi and Abu Mikhnaf from him.”21 The same [assertion] has appeared in al-Mughni.22

6. Saq’ab bin Zuhair al-Azdi. He transmitted reports from Abu ‘Uthman al-Nahdi, ‘Aun bin Abi Juhaifah al-Sawai, ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Shuraih al-Ma’afiri al-Iskandarani -who died in Alexandria in 167 H as reported in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (al-Tabari:6:193), ‘Umar bin ‘Abd al-Rahman bin al-Harith bin Hisham al-Makhzumi and Humaid bin Muslim.

Tabari narrates twenty reports from him [in his Tarikh], all of which are through Abu Mikhnaf who was relating them from [Saq’ab]. Three of these reports are about the death of the Prophet of Allah (S). [Saq’ab] was present with ‘Ali (as) at Siffin and thus related the words of ‘Ammar bin Yasir (5:38). He also narrated the report about the martyrdom of Hujr bin ‘Adiyy (5:253). Nine of these [reports] are pertaining to the event of Karbala’ and [another] three about Mukhtar.

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib says: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. Abu Zar’ah says that he was reliable, while according to Abu Hatim, he is a master (shaikh) who is not renowned.”23

It has appeared in the footnote of the book Khulasah Tadhhib Tahdhib al-Kamal that Abu Zar’ah has attested to his reliability.24

7. Mu’alla bin Kulaib al-Hamdani. He narrated [reports] from Abu al-Waddak Jabr bin Nauf al-Hamdani (see the fourth list, no.4).

8. Yusuf bin Yazid bin Bakr al-Azdi. He related [reports] from ‘Abdullah bin Khazim al-Azdi and ‘Afif bin Zuhair bin Abi al-Akhnas.

His full name has appeared in al-Tabari (6:284), from whom he has reported fifteen reports. He lived until after the year 77 H. Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “He was truthful and noble. He was from Basrah. A group [of narrators] have related [reports] from him. He has been praised by a number of people. His narrations [are reliable and] can be recorded.”25

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib writes: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. Al-Maqdisi says that he was reliable. According to Abu Hatim, his narrations can be recorded.”26 He has mentioned in Khulasah Tadhhib Tahdhib al-Kamal also.27

9. Yunus bin Abi Ishaq, ‘Amru bin ‘Abdullah al-Subi’i al-Hamdani al-Kufi. He reported from ‘Abbas bin Ju’dah al-Jadali about his coming out with Muslim bin ‘Aqil (as) with four thousand [men].

In his valuable book al-Muraja’at, our master [al-Sayyid] Sharaf al-Din says:

“The fact that his father, Abu Ishaq ‘Amru bin ‘Abdillah al-Subi’i al-Hamdani was a Shi‘ah has been asserted by Ibn Qutaibah in his al-Ma’arif and al-Shahristani in al-Milal wa al-Nihal. He was among the leading scholars in hadith, whose stands in theological (usul) and juridical (furu’) matters have not been praised [and approved] by the Nawasib; this is because they adhered, in these issues, to the path of the Ahl al-Bait (as) and were devoted in following them in everything related to the religion.

This is why al-Juzjani says [about him] -as it appears in the biography of Zubaid in Mizan al-I’tidal28: ‘There was a group from among the people of Kufah whose religious views [and beliefs] were not applauded by the people. [This group comprised] the leading scholars of hadith in Kufah, such as Abu Ishaq, Mansur, Zubaid al-Yami, al-A’mash and their contemporaries. They were tolerated by the people because of their truthfulness in speech. However, in cases where they did not give complete chains of transmission (arsalu), people hesitated to accept their narrations. Among such cases in which the Nawasib were reluctant to accept the mursal narrations of Abu Ishaq was ‘Umar bin Isma’il’s report which he narrated from Abu Ishaq [himself], as reported in Mizan al-I’tidal under his biography.29 [Abu Ishaq] says that the Prophet of Allah (S) said: ‘The example of ‘Ali is that of a tree whose root is me and its branch is ‘Ali. Al-Hasan and al-Husayn are its fruits, and the Shi‘ah are its leaves.’”

Sayyid Sharaf al-Din further adds: “Al-Mughirah did not say what has been reported in Mizan al-I’tidal that ‘None other than Abu Ishaq and al-A’mash have spoiled the hadith of the people of Kufah’30, or ‘Abu Ishaq and your U’aimash31 have destroyed the Kufans’32, except for the reason that they were Shi‘ah and sincere to the progeny of Muhammad (S), and that they used to preserve what has come in the Sunnah of their virtues, peace be upon them.”

Sayyid Sharaf al-Din then says: “The authors of the Sihah and others have adduced the narrations of each of these two [i.e. Abu Ishaq and A’mash] as proofs.”33

According to al-Wafayat, Abu Ishaq was born three years before the end of the caliphate of ‘Uthman, that is in 33 H, and he died in 132 H, as reported by Ibn Ma’in and al-Madaini.

His son, Yunus bin Abi Ishaq, has narrated [reports] from him. [Yunus] died in the year 159 H while he was in his ninties, if not above that, as reported by Mizan al-I’tidal.34 He is the one who related to Abu Mikhnaf the report on the uprising of Muslim (as) in Kufah from ‘Abbas bin Ja’dah. There is another report by [Yunus] in al-Tabari, apart from this one, regarding the dispatching of troops by Ibn Ziyad to besiege al-Husayn (as) before his arrival in Kufah; though he does not specify from whom he was narrating it (5:394). Tabari has narrated another eleven reports from him [in al-Tarikh] through Abu Mikhnaf, and other thirteen reports through other than Abu Mikhnaf.

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib says: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. Ibn Ma’in says that he is reliable. According to Abu Hatim, he was truthful. Al-Nassa’i says that there is no objection about him. According to Ibn ‘Adiyy, he has agreeable (hisan) narrations and people have related from him.” He then says: “He died in the year 159 H.”35

10. Sulaiman bin Abi Rashid al-Azdi. He narrated [reports] from ‘Abdullah bin Khazim al-Bakri al-Azdi, Humaid bin Muslim al-Azdi and Abu al-Kanud ‘Abd al-Rahman bin ‘Ubaid.

Tabari has narrated twenty of his reports [in his Tarikh], most of which are through [some] intermediaries. He was alive till 85 H (al-Tabari:6:360).

11. Mujalid bin Sa’id al-Hamdani. He narrated from ‘Amir al-Sha’bi al-Hamdani his report about the [the events] of Qasr Banu Muqatil (al-Tabari:5:407).

He has another report with an incomplete chain of narration (mursal) in which he does not mention anyone from whom he was relating it, regarding the betrayal of Muslim bin ‘Aqil by the people [of Kufah] and his loneliness, his entering the house of Taw’ah, the speech of Ibn Ziyad, the [disclosure of the] news by Bilal bin Taw’ah and the dispatch of Ibn al-Ash’ath by Ibn Ziyad to fight Muslim (as) (5:371-373).

Tabari has narrated seventy reports from him [in his Tarikh], most of which are from al-Sha’bi. Abu Mikhnaf describes him as al-muhaddith [i.e. the narrator] (5:413).

Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “He was well-known and was a narrator. According to al-Ashbah, he was a Shi‘ah. Mujalid died in 143 H.” Al-Dhahabi then relates from al-Bukhari that the latter, while mentioning the biography of Mujalid, narrated from him [a report] which he related from al-Sha’bi, that Ibn ‘Abbas said: “When Fatimah, daughter of the Prophet of Allah (S), was born, he named her al-Mansurah. So Jibrail descended [onto the Prophet (S)] and said: ‘O Muhammad! Allah is sending greetings to you and to your [newly] born child, and He says: ‘No child has been born dearer to me than her.’ He has given her a name better than what you have named her, he has named her Fatimah; as she will save (tufattimu) her followers (shi‘ah) from the hell fire.’”36

Al-Dhahabi then falsifies the [above] tradition under the pretext that she was born before the advent (bi’thah) of the Holy Prophet (S). It was because of this very narration that al-Dhahabi called him a Shi‘ah!

12. Qudamah bin Sa’id bin Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi. He related from his grandfather, Zaidah bin Qudamah, the coming out of Muhammad bin al-Ash’ath to fight and capture Muslim bin ‘Aqil (as), and [also Muslim’s] request for water at the gate of the palace and [the way he] was given the water (al-Tabari:5:373&375).

Tabari mentions him [in his Tarikh] without ascribing his report to his father or grandfather, which apparently does not seem to be correct; as he did not witness the events of Kufah. Rather, it was his grandfather, Zaidah, who witnessed the events and was in contact with them. He was in the company of ‘Amru bin Huraith -who had raised the banner of safe-conduct from Ibn Ziyad at the central mosque of Kufah [for anyone who wished to abandon Ibn ‘Aqil]- when Ibn Ziyad ordered them to send seventy men from [the tribe of] Qais with Muhammad bin al-Ash’ath to fight Muslim (5:373). It was there that Zaidah interceded [with Ibn Ziyad] on behalf of his cousin Mukhtar (5:570).

With regard to Qudamah bin Sa’id [himself], Shaikh [al-Tusi] has mentioned him in the circle of the companions of Imam al-Sadiq (as)37. His biography has been mentioned earlier [see the fourth list (no.9)].

13. Sa’id bin Mudrik bin ‘Umarah bin ‘Uqbah bin Abi Mu’it al-Umawi. He narrated from his grandfather, ‘Umarah bin ‘Uqbah, the report about sending his servant, Qais, to his house to bring water for Muslim bin ‘Aqil at the gate of the palace, before he was taken to Ibn Ziyad (5:376).

The text reads: “[Abu Mikhnaf says:] ‘Sa’id narrated to me… that ‘Umarah bin ‘Uqbah…” This report implies that [Sa’id] was in direct contact with the events and was not narrating it from any other person. [However,] this is highly improbable and it seems that he was narrating it from his grandfather, ‘Umarah.

Regarding this particular incident, we have given precedence to the report of Qudamah bin Sa’id -for reasons which we have mentioned in its appropriate place in this book- according to which it was [in fact] ‘Amru bin Huraith, and not ‘Umarah, who brought the water [for Ibn ‘Aqil].

14. Abu Janab Yahya bin Abi Hayyah al-Wada’i al-Kalbi. He narrated [reports] from ‘Adiyy bin Harmalah al-Asadi, on the authority of ‘Abdullah bin Sulaim and Mudhri bin al-Mushma’il, who were both from the tribe of Asad; and from Hani’ bin Thubait al-Hadhrami.

At times he [also] used to relate [reports] without mentioning his links. Among such reports is the one about the conversation of the followers of Muslim (as) with Ibn Ziyad (al-Tabari:5:369&370) and the one about the sending of the heads of Muslim and Hani’ to Yazid by Ibn Ziyad, with a letter to him concerning the matter (5:380). [However,] it seems, as mentioned earlier, that he was narrating the above reports from his brother Hani’ bin Abi Hayyah al-Wada’i al-Kalbi, the one who was sent by Ibn Ziyad to Yazid with the letter and the head of Muslim (5:380).

Tabari has narrated twenty three reports from him [in his Tarikh], nine of which are about the battles of Jamal, Siffin and Nahrawan, all of which are through intermediaries. Another nine are regarding [the event of] Karbala’, five of which are through intermediaries, while three of them have no chains of narration. It appears, however, that the [last] three [narrations] were also reported through [some] links and that he was not among those who were in direct contact with the events, though, it seems, that he lived at the time these events occurred.

He has been mentioned last [in al-Tabari] when he narrated [a report] -through an incomplete chain of narration- regarding the letter of Musa’b bin al-Zubair to Ibrahim bin al-Ashtar after the death of Mukhtar, inviting him to [support and pay allegiance to] him in the year 67 H (6:111).

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib says: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. According to Ibn Numair, Ibn Kharash, Abu Zur’ah and al-Saji, he was from Kufah and was truthful. Abu Na’im says that there is no objection about him, and he died in 150 H. According to Ibn Ma’in, he died in 147 H.”38

15. Harith bin Ka’b bin Fuqaim al-Walibi al-Azdi al-Kufi. He narrated [his reports] from ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an, ‘Ali bin al-Husayn and Fatimah bint ‘Ali (as).

[Harith] was among the followers of Mukhtar (al-Tabari:6:23), but he changed his opinion after him and [believed] in the divine leadership (imamah) of ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as) and began narrating from him (5:387). It seems that he had moved from Kufah to Madinah after he heard [narrations from] Imam Zain al-‘Abidin and Fatimah bint ‘Ali (as) (5:461).

Shaikh al-Tusi counted him in his Rijal among the companions of ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as). However, according to the Najaf edition of his Rijal, he calls him Hurr bin Ka’b al-Azdi al-Kufi, whereas the editor [of that book] names him ‘Harith’ in the footnote, quoting it from another transcript [of Rijal al-Tusi], which is in fact the correct opinion.

16. Isma’il bin ‘Abd al-Rahman bin Abi Karimah al-Suddi al-Kufi. He related from Fazari the report about Zuhair bin al-Qain.

Al-Dhahabi writes in Mizan al-I’tidal: “He was accused of being a Shi‘ah and that he used to revile Abu Bakr and ‘Umar. Ibn ‘Adiyy says: I consider him trustworthy. Ahmad says: he was reliable. According to Yahya bin Sa’id, I have not seen anyone mentioning al-Suddi except with good, and none has abandoned [his narrations]. Shu’bah and al-Thauri have narrated [reports] from him.”39

Tabari has related eighty four reports from him [in his Tarikh], reports concerning the events of after [even] 100 H.

According to Tahdhib al-Tahdhib40 and al-Kashif,41 he died in 127 H. He used to sit at the gate (suddah) of the central mosque in Kufah, and thus came to be known as ‘al-Suddi’. He was an associate of the Quraish. He has [also] narrated [reports] from al-Hasan (as).

17. Abu ‘Ali al-Ansari. He related from Bakr bin Mus’ab al-Muzniyy his report about the martyrdom of ‘Abdullah bin Yuqtur. This is the only report mentioned in al-Tabari from him. There is no mention of him [either] in the works of Rijal.

18. Laudhan. He narrated from his uncle the report of his meeting with al-Husayn (as) on his way [to Kufah]. His identity is not known.

19. Jamil bin Marthad al-Ghanawi. He related a report from Tirimmah bin ‘Adiyy al-Tai.

20. Abu Zuhair al-Nadhr bin Salih bin Habib al-‘Absi. He reported from Hassan bin Faid bin Bukair al-‘Absi his report about the letter of Ibn Sa‘d to Ibn Ziyad and the latter’s reply; and also from Qurrah bin Qais al-Tamimi his report regarding Hurr [al-Riyahi].

[Abu Zuhair] has thrity one narrations in al-Tabari. He lived during the time of Mukhtar (al-Tabari:6:81). He then came out with the army of Mus’ab bin al-Zubair to fight Qutriyy, the Khariji, in 68 H (6:127). Later he became the gatekeeper of Mutarraf bin al-Mughirah bin Shu’bah al-Thaqafi, the Khariji, in Madain in 77 H. He was a submissive young man and used to stand by [Mutarraf’s] head with his sword (6:287&289). He fought the army of Hajjaj along with Mutarraf in 77 H (6:298) and then returned to Kufah (6:299).

Imam al-Razi mentions [Abu Zuhair] in his al-Jurh wa al-Ta’dil and says: “I heard my father saying that: Abu Mikhnaf has narrated from him, while he was narrating from ‘Ali (as) through [some] links.”42

21. Harith bin Husairah al-Azdi. He related [reports] from ‘Abdullah bin Sharik al-‘Amiri al-Nahdi and [also] from ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as) through [‘Abdullah].

Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal and says: “Abu Ahmad al-Zubairi says: ‘He believed in the return of the pious (raj’ah). According to Yahya bin Ma’in, he was reliable and was a khashabi, attributed to the ‘wood’ (khashabah) on which Zayd bin ‘Ali was crucified [i.e. he was the follower of Zayd]. Ibn ‘Adiyy says that he was among the fanatic Shi‘ah in Kufah. Abu Hatim al-Razi believes that he was among the early Shi‘ah; he would have been forsaken had al-Thauri not narrated reports from him.”43

Al-Dhahabi narrates [a report] from Harith bin Husairah -when mentioning the biography of Nufay’ bin al-Harith al-Nakha’i al-Hamdani al-Kufi, the blind one- and [then] says: “He is truthful, but he is a rafidhi [i.e. a Shi‘ah]. He has narrated a tradition from ‘Imran bin Husayn, who said: ‘I was sitting with the Prophet (S) and ‘Ali was by his side when the Prophet (S) recited: ‘Is not he [best] who answers the distressed when he calls to him, and removes the distress and makes you the successors in the earth…’44.‘Ali [started] shivering [upon hearing the verse]. So the Prophet (S) tapped him with his hand and said: ‘None other than a believer will love you, and none other than a hypocrite will hate you, till the Day of Judgement.”45

Tabari has narrated ten reports from him [in his Tarikh], all of which are through Abu Mikhnaf.

Shaikh al-Tusi has mentioned him in his Rijal in the circle of the companions of Amir al-Mu’minin [‘Ali](as).46

22. ‘Abdullah bin ‘Asim al-Faishi al-Hamdani. He related the reports of Dahhak bin ‘Abdullah al-Mushriqi al-Hamdani.

Al-Ardabili says in Jami’ al-Ruwat: “There is a report in al-Kafi by [‘Abdullah] from Imam al-Sadiq (as) concerning the time of tayammum. Al-‘Asqalani has mentioned him in al-Tahdhib. According to Basair al-Darajat, Aban bin ‘Uthman and Ja’far bin Bashir have narrated [reports] from him.”47

23. Abu al-Dahhak. He related the report about the night of ‘Ashura’ from ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as).

Al-Dhahabi has mentioned him Mizan al-I’tidal (3:540; Haiderabad edition) and al-‘Asqalani in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (12:136) saying that Shu’bah has reported from him.

24. ‘Amru bin Murrah al-Jamali. He related the report of the retainer of ‘Abd Rabbih al-Ansari, on the authority of Abu Salih al-Hanafi, regarding the joking of his master with Burair bin Khudhair (al-Tabari:5:423).

Al-Dhahabi has mentioned him in his Mizan al-I’tidal (3:288). So has al-‘Asqalani in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (8:102) and says: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat and says that he died in 116 H. Ahmad bin Hanbal has commended him and says that he died in 118 H. According to al-Bukhari, he has narrated around two hundred traditions from ‘Ali (as). Shu’bah says that he was the most learned [of the narrators]. Abu Hatim maintains that he was truthful and reliable. According to Ibn Ma’in, he was reliable.”

25. ‘Ata’ bin al-Saib. He narrated the report of Masruq bin Wail al-Hadhrami, on the authority of his brother ‘Abd al-Jabbar bin Wail al-Hadhrami, on the falling of Ibn Hawzah at the beginning of the battle (al-Tabari:5:431).

Al-‘Asqalani refers to [‘Abd al-Jabbar] in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib as ‘Abd al-Jabbar bin Wail. He then says: “He has narrated from his brother. Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat and said that he died in 112 H.”

‘Ata was from Makkah. He witnessed the demolition of the Ka’bah and its renovation by Ibn Zubair in the year 64 H (5:582). Hajjaj did not kill him in the year 94 H (6:488).

The author of Tahdhib al-Tahdhib writes that: “Ibn Hibban has mentioned him in al-Thuqat. So has Ibn Sa‘d in his al-Tabaqat and said that he died in 137 H.”

26. ‘Ali bin HanZalah bin As’ad al-Shabami al-Hamdani. He related the report of Kathir bin ‘Abdullah al-Sha’bi al-Hamdani about the speech of Zuhair bin al-Qain (al-Tabari:5:426).

‘Ali bin HanZalah is the same Ibn HanZalah bin As’ad al-Shabami, who [is said to have been] martyred from among the companions of al-Husayn (as). [However,] it appears that he was either not present in Karbala’, or he was considered very young [by the enemy] and thus was not killed. He has not narrated any report directly. He related this report here, rather, from Kathir bin ‘Abdullah al-Sha’bi, the assassin of Zuhair bin al-Qain.

27. Husayn bin ‘Uqbah al-Muradi. He narrated from al-Zubaidiyy the attack launched by ‘Amru bin al-Hajjaj al-Zubaidiyy [on the day of ‘Ashura’].

28. Abu Hamzah Thabit bin Dinar al-Thumali. He related from Qasim bin Bukhait, on the authority of ‘Abdullah al-Thumali, his report about the captives in Sham (5:465). Abu Hamzah is too renowned to be mentioned here.

29. Abu Ja’far al-‘Absi. He related the report of Abu ‘Umarah al-‘Absi about the verses recited by Yahya bin al-Hakam.

These were the twenty nine people who served as links between Abu Mikhnaf and those who had witnessed the events.

The Sixth List

It comprises the narrations from the Aimmah (as) or from the narrators among their companions, and the [reports of the] historians. They are fifteen in number.

1. Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn, Zain al-‘Abidin (as). He narrated the letter of ‘Abdullah bin Ja’far to Imam al-Husayn (as), through his two sons ‘Aun and Muhammad; the letter of ‘Amru bin Said bin al-‘As al-Ashdaq, through his brother Yahya bin Said al-‘As, to al-Husayn (as) -as he was departing from Makkah- and his reply to him. Abu Mikhnaf related this through Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi al-Azdi, who was reporting it from ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as) (al-Tabari:5:387-388). [Another narration from al-Sajjad (as) was] Imam al-Husayn’s request for respite for the night of ‘Ashura’ and the speech he delivered to his companions. Abu Mikhnaf was narrating this from Harith al-Azdi, who related it from ‘Abdullah bin Sharik al-‘Amiri al-Nahdi, and he from Imam Zain al-‘Abidin (as) (5:418). [Also] the verses recited by al-Husayn (as) on the night of ‘Ashura’ and the words of [Lady] Zainab and al-Husayn’s reply to her, which Abu Mikhnaf narrated from Harith al-Azdi and Abu al-Dahhak (5:420-421).

2. Imam Muhammad bin ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as). [Abu Mikhnaf related from him] the martyrdom of the infant [of al-Husayn (as)], through ‘Uqbah bin Bashir al-Asadi (al-Tabari:5:448).

3. Imam Ja’far bin Muhammad bin ‘Ali bin al-Husayn. [Abu Mikhnaf narrated from him through an incomplete chain of narration] the number of stab wounds and [sword] strikes on the body of al-Husayn (as) (al-Tabari:5:453).

4. Zayd bin ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as) and Dawud bin ‘Ubaidullah bin ‘Abbas. They related the words of the sons of ‘Aqil [on the night of ‘Ashura’] (al-Tabari:5:397).

It was ‘Amru bin Khalid al-Wasiti, an associate of the Banu Hashim, who narrated the report from them. He was [residing] in Kufah and later moved to Wasit. He has related from Zayd and [from] Imam al-Sadiq (as) [as well].

Al-Najjashi mentions [‘Amru] in his Rijal (pg.205; India edition) saying: “He has a voluminous book from which Nasr bin Muzahim al-Minqari and others have narrated.” In his Rijal (pg.128; Najaf edition), Shaikh al-Tusi considers him to be among the companions of Imam al-Baqir (as).”

Al-Mamqani has mentioned him in his al-Tanqih (2:330) and so has al-‘Asqalani in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (8:36).

5. Fatimah bint ‘Ali, as she has been referred to by al-Tabari. She narrated [what transpired in] the court of Yazid. [Abu Mikhnaf related this report from her] through Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi al-Azdi (al-Tabari:5:461-462). It is clear that the person who narrated [reports] from her and Imam al-Sajjad (as), is one and the same.

6. Abu Sa’id ‘Aqisa. [Abu Mikhnaf related from him], through some of his companions, the conversation of Ibn al-Zubair with al-Husayn (as) in the Sacred mosque, while the latter was in the state of ihram (al-Tabari:5:385).

‘Allamah al-Hilli mentions him in the circle of the companions of ‘Ali (as) in the first part of his work, al-Khulasah.48 Al-Dhahabi mentions him in Mizan al-I’tidal saying: “He has related [reports] from ‘Ali (as).” He then says: “According to Shu’bah, he is reliable and his name is Dinar. He was a Shi‘ah who died in 125 H.”49 We have already mentioned him earlier [see the fourth list (no.1)].

7. Muhammad bin Qais. He narrated: the letter of Imam al-Husayn (as) which he sent with Qais bin Musahhar al-Saidawi to the people of Kufah and the martyrdom of [Ibn Musahhar]; Muslim bin ‘Aqil’s letter to al-Husayn (as); the words of ‘Abdullah bin Muti’ al-‘Adawi to the Imam (as) and his reply, through an incomplete chain of narration (al-Tabari:5:394-396); and the martyrdom of Habib bin MuZahir, [also] through an incomplete chain of narration (5:440).

Al-Kashhi says: “[Muhammad once] informed Imam al-Baqir (as) [of his narrations], so he (as) stopped him from listening to such and such person.”50 Al-Kashhi [then] describes him as a defender of the divine leadership (imamah) of Imam al-Baqir (as).51

Al-Najjashi says regarding him: “He is a notable personality and reliable. He was from Kufah. He has narrations from Abu Ja’far [al-Baqir] and Abu ‘Abdillah [al-Sadiq (as)]”.52

Shaikh al-Tusi has mentioned him in al-Fihrist under entries 591 and 644.53 In his Rijal, al-Tusi has mentioned four persons, with this very name, to be among the companions of Imam al-Sadiq (as).54 So has ‘Allamah al-Hilli in al-Khulasah.55

8. ‘Abdullah bin Sharik al-‘Amiri al-Nahdi. He related from ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as): al-Husayn’s request for respite for the night of ‘Ashura’; the Imam’s speech to his companions; the verses recited by al-Husayn (as) on the night of ‘Ashura’, the words of [Lady] Zainab (as) and his reply to her (al-Tabari:5:418&420).

He has also narrated through an incomplete chains of narration reports about the arrival of Shamir at Karbala’ with the letter of safe-conduct for the brothers of ‘Abbas (as), and Ibn Sa‘d’s advancing against al-Husayn (as) in the evening of the ninth of Muharram (5: 415&416).

Al-Kashhi says that he was a disciple of Imam al-Baqir and al-Sadiq (as).56

According to a narration, [‘Abdullah] will return to this world and be at the service al-Qaim (as), may Allah hasten his reappearance.57 [Yet] according to another tradition, he will be the standard bearer on that day.”58

It appears from al-Tabari that he was one of the leading figures among the followers of Mukhtar (6:49,51&104). He then joined Mus’ab (6:161). Later, he left him because of the safe-conduct from ‘Abd al-Malik bin Marwan (6: 161). [In any case,] he may have repented after this and thus became among the companions of the Aimmah (as).

9. Abu Khalid al-Kabuli. He related a report, through an incomplete chain of narration, about the supplication of al-Husayn (as) on the morning of [the day of] ‘Ashura’. (al-Tabari:5:423).

Tabari refers to him as Abu Khalid al-Kahili. But he has not been refered to by this name in any of the existing famous works of Rijal. [However,] the existing predominant view [about his name] is what we have mentioned [above], and which is [in fact] the correct opinion.

Al-Kashhi says that he fled from Hajjaj and hid himself in Makkah and was thus saved from him. He [then] served Muhammad bin al-Hanafiyyah, believing in his divine leadership (imamah). Later, he turned away from him to Imam al-Sajjad (as)59 and became his disciple from among his companions60. He served the Imam (as) for a long time before returning to his [home] town.61

Shaikh al-Tusi has counted him in the circle of the companions of Imam al-Sajjad (as).62

The editor of this work says: It seems to me that he was among those non-Arabs (mawali) who were [supporting] Mukhtar. And this is why he believed in the imamah of Muhammad bin al-Hanafiyyah and fled from Hajjaj; as there was no [other] reason for his fleeing from Hajjaj except that [he was with Mukhtar].

10. ‘Uqbah bin Bashir al-Asadi. He related from Imam al-Baqir (as) the martyrdom of the infant [of al-Husayn (as)] (al-Tabari:5:453).

Al-Kashhi mentions him [in his Rijal] and says: “He sought the permission of Imam al-Baqir (as) to be in charge of the monthly stipends of his people for the [then] ruler, but he (as) did not allow him.” Al-Kashhi has brought the [above] report of his under the narrations of the martyrdom of the infant.63

Shaikh al-Tusi has mentioned him in the circle of the companions of Imam ‘Ali bin al-Husayn64 and al-Baqir (as)65.

‘Uqbah al-Asadi has an elegy in al-Tabari in lamentation of the companions of Mukhtar (6:116).

11. Qudamah bin Sa’id bin Zaidah bin Qudamah al-Thaqafi. He narrated from him grandfather: the coming out of Muhammad bin al-Ash’ath bin Qais al-Kindi to fight and capture Muslim bin ‘Aqil (al-Tabari:5:373), and his request for water at the gate of the palace and [the way] it was granted (5:375).

Al-Tusi mentions him in the circle of the companions of Imam al-Sadiq (as).66

12. Harith bin Ka’b al-Walibi al-Azdi. He narrated [reports] from ‘Uqbah bin Sim’an, ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as) and Fatimah bint ‘Ali (as).

He was among the followers of Mukhtar (al-Tabari:6:23). He later moved to Madinah and heard [narrations] from Imam [al-Sajjad (as)].

Al-Tusi has mentioned him in his Rijal among the companions of ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as).67

13. Harith bin Hasirah al-Azdi. He related from ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as) on the authority of ‘Abdullah bin Sharik al-‘Amiri al-Nahdi. He has been mentioned earlier [see the fifth list (no.21)].

Al-Tusi mentions him among the companions of ‘Ali [bin al-Husayn (as)] and al-Baqir (as).68

14. Abu Hamzah Thabit bin Dinar al-Thumali al-Azdi. He was an Azdi through a treaty of friendship (wala’). He related [reports] from Qasim bin Bukhait, on the authority of ‘Abdullah al-Thumali al-Azdi, regarding the captives in Sham (al-Tabari:5:465).

Al-Kashhi mentions him and then relates a tradition from Imam al-Ridha (as) in which he said: “Abu Hamzah al-Thumali was in his time what Luqman was in his; this is because he served four of us: ‘Ali bin al-Husayn, Muhammad bin ‘Ali, Ja’far bin Muhammad and Musa bin Ja’far for some time.”69

‘Amir bin ‘Abdullah bin Judha’ah al-Azdi [once] asked Abu ‘Abdillah [al-Sadiq] (as) about intoxicants (muskir). He replied: “Any kind of intoxicant is forbidden (haram).” [‘Amir] then said: “But Abu Hamzah does drink.” When the news reached Abu Hamzah, he repented and said: “Now I seek Allah’s forgiveness from it and repent to Him.”70

[One day] Abu Basir visited Imam al-Sadiq (as), so he (as) asked him about Abu Hamzah. He replied: “He was sick when I left him.” The Imam (as) said: “When you return to him, convey my greetings to him and inform him that he is going to die on a certain day of a certain month.”71

‘Ali bin al-Hasan bin Fadhdhal says: “Abu Hamzah, Zurarah and Muhammad bin Muslim [all of them] died in the same year; a year or so after the demise of Abu ‘Abdillah [al-Sadiq] (as).72

Al-Najjashi mentions him and says: “He was a non-Arab (maulan) from Kufah and he was reliable. According to Muhammad bin ‘Umar al-Ja’abi al-Tamimi, he was a retainer of Muhallab bin Abi Sufrah and his sons: Hamzah, Mansur and Nuh, all of whom were killed along with Zayd bin ‘Ali bin al-Husayn (as). He lived during the times of ‘Ali bin al-Husayn, Abu Ja’far, Abu ‘Abdillah and Abu al-Hasan (as), and has reported from them. He was among our outstanding personalities, trustworthy and reliable in [his] narrations.”73

Shaikh [al-Tusi] brings him in al-Fihrist74 and mentions him in the circle of the companions of Imam al-Sajjad75, Imam al-Baqir76, Imam al-Sadiq77 and Imam al-KaZim (as).78

Al-Dhahabi has mentioned him in al-Mizan79 and so has al-‘Asqalani in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib.80

These were the fourteen people from among the Aimmah (as) and their companions, who are part of the chains of narration (isnad) in this book.

[However,] there are [some] other people from whom Abu Mikhnaf has related some historical events, who were not eye-witnesses [of the event], rather they were historians, like ‘Aun bin Abi Juhaifah al-Sawai al-Kufi (d.116 H), as reported in Taqrib al-Tahdhib. [Abu Mikhnaf narrated from him,] among other reports, the date al-Husayn (as) left Madinah for Makkah, the duration of his stay in the city and his departure from Makkah, [all] through Saq’ab bin Zuhair.

The editor of this work says: We will content ourselves with this much as an introduction to this book, hoping that Allah, the Almighty, will grant us success in achieving His pleasure, and in serving the unsubmitting to the oppression (abiyyu al-dhaim), the lord of martyrs, Husayn bin ‘Ali (as).

And the last of our cry is all praise be to Allah, the Lord of the worlds.

  • 1. He was the retainer of Rabab, daughter of Imru’ al-Qais al-Kalbi and the mother of Sakinah -daughter of al-Husayn (as). He was taken to ‘Umar bin Sa’d on the day of ‘Ashura’ who asked him: “Who are you?” He replied: “I am a slave.” So he freed him (al-Tabari:5:454).
  • 2. Lisan al-Mizan (4:179, 3:88 and 2:433).
  • 3. Mizan al-I’tidal (2:139).
  • 4. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (8:453).
  • 5. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.40; Najaf edition).
  • 6. Lisan al-Mizan (5:94).
  • 7. Rijal al-Tusi (pg136&289). Tabari mentions him in Dhayl al-Mudhayyal (pg.651; Dar Suwaidan publications), quoting from al-Tabaqat of Ibn Sa’d (6:358), and says that he died in Kufah in the year 146 H during the rule of Mansur.
  • 8. Mizan al-I’tidal (4:584; Aleppo edition)
  • 9. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (2:60) and in Tanqih al-Maqal (3:27).
  • 10. Ibid, (6:277).
  • 11. Rijal al-Tusi (pg. 275; Najaf edition).
  • 12. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (7:472) and Khulasah Tadhhib Tahdhib al-Kamal (pg.284).
  • 13. Tanqih al-Maqal (2:109). As we said earlier, the source of this assertion is the current Maqtal which is ascribed to Abu Mikhnaf. This is the report on which Muhaddith al-Qumi has commented in Nafas al-Mahmum (pg.195).
  • 14. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (5:65).
  • 15. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (2:251).
  • 16. Al-Khulasah (pg.193).
  • 17. Mizan al-I’tidal (2:139 and 3:88). In a report which has appeared in Kamil al-Ziyarah of Ibn Qulawayh (pg.23) and whose chain of narration ends at [Abu Sa’id], the latter says: “After ‘Abdullah bin al-Zubair had a lengthy talk with [al-Husayn] in privacy, al-Husayn (as) turned to the people and I heard him saying: ‘This man is telling me: ‘Be a pigeon among the pigeons of this Sacred sanctuary.’

    Indeed, it is more preferable to me to be killed at an arms length from the holy sanctuary that at a span from it; and it is dearer to me to be killed on the banks [of the Euphrates] than to be killed in [this] Haram.” Based on this chain of narration, [Abu Sa’id] directly heard [the words of] the Imam (as), contrary to the manner Abu Mikhnaf narrates [the report] from him. [Anyhow,] al-Kamil is more complete (akmal) [and correct in case of contradiction between what has appeared in it and what Abu Mikhnaf has narrated].

  • 18. Jami’ al-Ruwat (1:447).
  • 19. Lisan al-Mizan (3:408; Haiderabad edition).
  • 20. Ibid, (2:178).
  • 21. Ibid, (6:171).
  • 22. Al-Mughni (2:701; Dar al-Da’wah publications).
  • 23. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (4:432).
  • 24. Al-Khulasah (pg.176; Dar al-Da’wah publications).
  • 25. Mizan al-I’tidal (4:475).
  • 26. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (11:429).
  • 27. Al-Khulasah (pg.440).
  • 28. Mizan al-I’tidal (2:66; Aleppo edition).
  • 29. Ibid, (3:246).
  • 30. Ibid, (3:270).
  • 31. U’aimash is the dimunitive noun of A’mash. It has been used here by al-Mughirah for the purpose of belittling the personality of A’mash.
  • 32. Ibid, (2:224).
  • 33. Al-Muraja’at (pg.100; al-Sadiq publications).
  • 34. Mizan al-Itidal (4:483).
  • 35. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (1:433).
  • 36. Mizan al-I’tidal (3:438). It has been said that he died in the month of Dhu al-Hijjah 143 or 144 H, as reported in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib.
  • 37. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.275; Najaf edition).
  • 38. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (11:201).
  • 39. Mizan al-I’tidal (1:236; Aleppo edition).
  • 40. Tahdhib alTahdhib (1:313).
  • 41. Ibid, (1:236).
  • 42. Al-Jurh wa al-Ta’dil (8:477).
  • 43. Mizan al-I’tidal (1:432; Aleppo edition).
  • 44. Qur’an, 27:62.
  • 45. Mizan al-I’tidal (4:272).
  • 46. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.39; Najaf edition). He also mentions him among the companions of Imam al-Baqir (as) as Harith bin Husayn al-Azdi, which is incorrect.
  • 47. Jami’ al-Ruwat (1:494).
  • 48. Al-Khulasah (pg.193; Najaf edition).
  • 49. Mizan al-I’tidal (2:139).
  • 50. Rijal al-Kashhi (pg.340; hadith no.630).
  • 51. Ibid, (pg.237; hadith no.430).
  • 52. Rijal al-Najjashi (pg.226; India edition).
  • 53. Al-Fihrist (pg.157&176).
  • 54. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.298, entry no.294; Najaf edition).
  • 55. Al-Khulasah (pg.150, entry no.60 onwards; Najaf edition).
  • 56. Rijal al-Kashhi (pg.10, hadith no.20).
  • 57. Ibid, (pg.217, hadith no.390).
  • 58. Ibid, (hadith no.391).
  • 59. Ibid, (pg.124, hadith no.195).
  • 60. Ibid, (pg.9, hadith no.20).
  • 61. Ibid, (pg.121, hadith no.193).
  • 62. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.100, entry no.2, under the name ‘Kankar’).
  • 63. Rijal alKashhi (pg.203, hadith no.358).
  • 64. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.99, entry no.32; Najaf edition).
  • 65. Ibid, (pg.129, entry no.29).
  • 66. Ibid, (pg.129, entry no.29).
  • 67. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.87; Najaf edition).
  • 68. Ibid, (pg.39&118).
  • 69. Rijal al-Kashhi (pg.203, hadith no.357 and pg.485, hadith no.919).
  • 70. Ibid, (pg.201, hadith no.354; Mashad edition).
  • 71. Ibid, (pg.202, hadith no.356).
  • 72. Ibid, (pg.201, hadith no.353).
  • 73. Ibid, (pg.83; India edition).
  • 74. Al-Fihrist (pg.66; Najaf edition).
  • 75. Rijal al-Tusi (pg.84; Najaf edition).
  • 76. Ibid, (pg.110).
  • 77. Ibid, (pg.160).
  • 78. Ibid, (pg.345).
  • 79. Mizan al-I’tidal (1:363).
  • 80. Tahdhib al-Tahdhib (2:7).