Hijab

A hijab (Arabic: حجاب‎ ḥijāb) in common English usage is a veil worn by some Muslim women in the presence of any male outside of their immediate family, which usually covers the head and chest. The term can refer to any head, face, or body covering worn by Muslim women that conforms to Islamic standards of modesty. Hijab can also refer to the seclusion of women from men in the public sphere, or it may denote a metaphysical dimension, for example referring to "the veil which separates man or the world from God." People usually talk about "the hijab" rather than "a hijab", as evidenced by this article.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala

According to the mainstream view of our esteemed jurists, the feet is a part of hijab and it is obligatory for them to be covered, like any other part of a woman's body, with the exemption of her face and hands. 

However, in regards to Salat, a woman does not need to cover her feet while she is praying, as long as she is in a place where it is not possible for a non-mahram to see her. 

And Allah knows best. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 weeks ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If you know that this non-mahram man will look at your images without hijab, then no it is not permissible for you to give them to him to get them developed. Your choice is to either print the images yourself, using the available printing machines in certain stores, or go to a place run by a female, or other similar options. 

And Allah knows best. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 weeks ago

Muslim woman is not required to observe full Hijab in front of non-Muslim women, although we have narrations advising Muslim women to be careful from non-Muslim women who might inform their non-Muslim spouses About the details of the body of Muslim woman. Muslim woman should not expose her body in front of non-Muslim women more than what is required in modesty.

'Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 1 month ago

In and of itself, it is not offensive - Muslims don't have a monopoly on head-covering. 

If someone is specifically wearing a style of head-covering that specifically seems to identify them as a Muslim:

* Clothing is a form of social signalling and identification. It is worth mentioning that, in general, the hijab comes with a package of values, beliefs, and social expectations (for instance, it is generally assumed that women who wear hijab pray regularly, are committed Muslims, behave in accordance with certain Islamic norms, do not date before marriage, etc), just as one might expect someone wearing a priest's collar to behave or not-behave in certain ways. So it is worth taking that into consideration. At the very least, someone might be surprised if they see a woman wearing a hijab buying bacon, for example.

* If someone is doing it to fetishize Islam and as a popularity stunt, it could be offensive and a form of cultural appropriation. For instance, if someone wears a a Muslim-style headscarf but posts sexually explicit photos, a bikini photo, a bar photo, etc. Some magazines and media outlets these days have caught on to the idea that "Muslim-ness" can be a great selling tool and some of the ways they use this to sell fashion is offensive, or, at least, against the spirit of hijab.

So, basically, if someone is choosing to wear a headscarf style that specifically makes them look like a Muslim, it would largely come down to intent and how they are presenting themselves and if they are doing it respectfully. 

Also note that people vary in their views of what they personally consider offensive or not. Some Muslim women might be very happy to see other women wearing the hijab and others might be taken aback. It's difficult to please all the people all the time! In my view, the most important thing is just to be authentic to yourself, whatever that might mean for you.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

There is shar'i matter of Islamic maturity, which is bulugh, and as you know the boy needs to experience one of three things for him to become baligh:

1. Having a wetdream.

2. Growth of coarse hair around the private parts.

3. Completion of 15 lunar years.

If one is not close to this boy, or does not directly ask him, they would not know if the boy is "baligh". 

That is why there is something else that is very important, and that is the age of discernment (sin al-tamyiz).

This basically means that he has reached a certain age where he is able to discern between right and wrong, good and bad, and he understands his surroundings. 

When a boy reaches such a stage, he must be taught and also treated like as if he is baligh. He cannot show his private parts, nor can anyone else see his private parts. His should pray, fast, and do other wajibat, and stay away from muharramaat. Hijab must be observed in his presence, and everything else related to what a mukallaf should do.

As for what age does a boy become discerning, in general, this is defined individually by noticing his conduct, mental capacity and behaviour. 

And Allah knows best. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As human beings we are naturally inclined to covering up, and this is something intrinsic within our very nature that Almighty God has endowed upon us. 

Islam mandates that we stay with our fitrah, under all circumstances, irrespective of time or place. We need to preserve our traditional ways as modest dignified human beings, irrespective of what our current society has evolved into. 

If we look back 50 years, we can see that "covering up" was not only the trend, but all of society found it to be abnormal for someone to have their hair exposed. 

As Muslims, male and female, we must feel empowered by what the Almighty has mandated upon us, because the benefit will all return back to us. If we fall short of strengthening our faith in this, by educating ourselves and surrounding ourselves with a positive spiritual and religious atmosphere, then we will start entering into doubts and giving into misconceptions. 

As a Muslim, you know that hijab is obligatory, and your level of knowledge or faith might not be that strong to feel its value and necessity. Taking it off will not increase your knowledge or faith in it, but rather remove you further away from it. 

We all struggle with our spiritual and religious challenges we face on a daily basis. For instance, how many of us really feel connected to God when we pray? If it was the case that because I don't feel that connection with God, I am going to stop praying until I get that connection. 

Or, I don't understand the Quran, and therefore I am not going to read it until I am "ready". That will never happen. 

I can say that these kind of thoughts are shaitani thoughts, and we need to be positive about it and work on it. Yes, we need to challenge ourselves, and question our ways, but also find satisfactory results that would not only please ourselves, but also please the Almighty. 

Abandoning hijab will not bring her closer to Islam or will not grant her access to understanding the importance of wearing hijab. It will do exactly the opposite. When we turn away from God, things wont get better. 

Yes, it is very difficult to wear hijab, especially in an environment which goes completely against it, but that is the beauty of it, and it is what will make you stronger.

The best scenario would be for her to continue on with observing hijab, but dedicate as much time and effort in learning about it. Spend time on researching about your religion and how you can increase your faith and practice it with comprehension and devotion. Be inspired by the right people and gain positive influence through religious people. 

Do not be distracted or deceived by how society has evolved itself into today. Preserve your dignity, your modesty and your nature of who you are, and be proud of it. 

With prayers for your success.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 2 months ago

As a female, it took some time for me to realise that it is not unusual for men to feel some physical attraction when they look at women in their immediate family (even a daughter or sister), especially if they are significantly uncovered. Also, that many men do subconsciously "track" the attractiveness of female relatives (even if they themselves would never act on it and would deny it, but still they may be subconsciously evaluating how attractive they may come across to other men). 

Of course given the taboo of incest these thoughts are usually shoved aside. However, sometimes they come out, for instance, some men become uncomfortable when their daughters pass puberty and develop a womanly figure. Or sometimes in sharp comments about clothing and behaviour, etc. 

I say "as a female" because I don't think most women tend to feel the same way about male relatives, and the majority of women would probably respond with something along the lines of "Ewwwww".

[An exception would be with respect to blood relatives who never met in childhood, for instance, a half brother and half sister who meet each other only in adulthood. There is some psychological phenomenon that happens whereby it is not uncommon to feel some sort of attraction, in which case that could also be taken into consideration here, even though technically they are mahram and certainly a marriage is unlawful.]

I am not saying that this always happens, but just that it isn't an unusual dynamic and is one that it took me time to put into words. So it could be considered, at the end of this day, this comment either will apply or won't apply to a person's family dynamic. 

(Also I apologise for any generalisations in the above, generalistions happen but I do acknowledge the perils of them!)

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

Yes, the obligatory dress in front of Mahram like real father, brother, real uncles must cover the parts of the body which if left uncovered can cause bad feelings or bad effect. Although full Hijab is not obligatory in front of Mahram close relatives ( mentioned above) but modest dress is obligatory.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

Colored lenses are considered as part of beauty's parts, that is why it is not permissible in front of the non Mahram men. It makes no difference whether it is prescribed or not. Lenses should not be a part of attraction towards the female.

Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 2 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. While the wisdom is not known with certainty, some have opined that it is a symbol that the female path to God is one of chastity and so the donning of full hijab during prayer to a God who sees the female in all her states is a symbol of that path. 

May you always be successful

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Seyed Ali Shobayri, Seyed Ali Shobayri is of mixed Iranian and Scottish descent who found the path of the Ahlul Bayt (a) by his own research. He holds a BA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University through the... Answered 3 months ago

Bismillah, 

Asalamu Alaykom, 

You must try your best to wear hijab or make yourself in a situation which allows you to wear it. The family must not be obeyed when they ask you to do something against Islamic laws. 
 

May Allah grant you success 

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Seyed Ali Shobayri, Seyed Ali Shobayri is of mixed Iranian and Scottish descent who found the path of the Ahlul Bayt (a) by his own research. He holds a BA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University through the... Answered 4 months ago

Bismillah,

Asalamu Alaykom,

You should marry the spouse who is most religiously compatible with you.
 

Not wearing hijab openly is an act of fisq and is a sin. One must remember that such a woman will raise their future kids if Allah blesses them. If a young girl was to see her mother not wearing hijab or dressed in ways which are not proper, she may imitate this. 
 

The same applies for a woman in choosing a man. Does she want a man who doesn't pray and who may do sins in front of her kids? 
 

May Allah grant you success