Woman

A woman is a female human being. The word woman is usually reserved for an adult, with girl being the usual term for a female child or adolescent.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 weeks ago

Her husband gets one quarter. The remaining three quarters goes to the son and daughter who were alive when the woman died. Two shares for the son and one share for the daughter. 
If the daughter had already passed away before her mother, the son will get the three quarters.

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 1 month ago

There is some discussion of this topic here: https://www.al-islam.org/ask/is-it-the-case-that-only-men-are-allowed-to...

The main reason why it is unlikely that a woman will become a marja' today is not theoretical, since there may be many approaches to Islamic law, but rather is practical. That is, there are social forces that would push a woman off of the path of becoming a marja', and women do not have the same networking, educational, or social  support that men have and which people need to succeed in any field. (Although some Iranian women become mujtahids and there are structures in place in Iran to facilitate that, less so in other countries although it occurs in other countries also.) Furthermore, women who are religiously conservative are generally encouraged to avoid positions of public leadership or to avoid being publicly visible.

Maybe in the future it will be different.

However, it is worth considering that there are many forms of religious and spiritual leadership. While we focus mostly on the role of the marja' as the chief jurist, or chief legal expert, people require guidance and leadership in many areas of life, including family matters, spiritual guidance, ethics, politics, charitable work, and so forth. Some marja's do offer guidance in these areas also but not all do, as it is not possible for one person to specialize in every single thing or to do every single thing at one time. Furthermore, even within the Islamic sciences, there are other areas of expertise that are also important such as tafsir. So it is also valuable to become a leader or expert in other areas of religion, not only jurisprudence/law.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 month ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If this was accidental, and not in her control or on purpose, in that she was not "masturbating", then there is no sin and she does not need to pray for forgiveness. 

Of course, if she knows that doing certain things while exercising, or some kind of friction, etc, would sexually arouse her and lead her to reaching climax, then she must avoid that. 

And Allah knows best. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The discharge a woman experiences is tahir, even if it is due to lustful thoughts, as long as it was not an orgasm. 

She does not need to do ghusl, or anything else. 

And Allah knows best.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

The reward of the believers who do good does not depend on the quantity but the quality of worship. Quality of worship depends on the degree of sincerity and dedication to Allah (SWT). Woman during menstruation gets reward for every good deed she does and gets also compensation for the suffering of menstruation. That will make her reward not less that the reward of pious men who do good. There is no question of any discrimination between man and woman in front of Allah (SWT) who created both of them and granted them equal chances and help to do good. 
'Wassalam.

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She must pray in standing position where ever she can and not in sitting position when she is able to stand. If she prays in sitting position while she is able to stand, her prayer will be invalid.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

She is allowed to do so for serving the noble aims of Ahlul Bayt (AS). Men will be allowed to listen as far as her voice does not cause unwanted effect on non Mahram men, otherwise they should avoid listening.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 4 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala
 

Temporary marriage can only be performed with a woman who is from Ahlul Kitab, i.e. she is either a Muslim, a Christian or a Jew. 

If she is of any other faith, or just believes in a supreme being, but does not follow any of the 3 Abrahamic religions, then you cannot do mut'ah with her.

And Allah knows best. 

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Mateen Charbonneau, Sheikh Mateen Joshua Charbonneau achieved a certificate from Harvard University in Islamic Studies. He undertook Howza classes under esteemed scholars since 2013 and has been teaching at Imam Mahdi... Answered 4 months ago

Yes a woman can swim if she is wearing the proper islamic covering. A lot of times the women swim in a place for women only. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 5 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, a Seyid male/female is allowed to marry a non-Seyid male/female. There is nowhere in our religion that somehow forces Seyids/Seyidahs to marry someone like them. This has also unfortunately turned into a very negative culture as well. The esteemed Marja' A.U. Seyid Sistani has pointed to this in a statement where he admonished some parents who cling onto this wrong culture and reject prospect spouses on the basis that they are not Seyids/Seyidahs. 

With prayers for your success.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 5 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As far as you are concerned, following the madhhab of Ahlul Bayt (a.s.) is a part of your personality and identity, and your marriage should not obstruct your affiliation to your Shi'i identity. This should be made clear to your fiance. 

In regards to your future children, you as their mother must try to nurture them in such a way where they are aware of their religion and abide to the laws of Islam. Which madhhab they choose is completely up to them, when they become mature and of age. 

If you instill within them the love of religion and the urge to pursue truth and evidence, and allow them to research and read and decide themselves, you've done your obligation.  The rest is for them to decide. 

Your main focus must be on accompanying your husband to be in a noble spiritual way, and avoiding anything that would hurt or harm his understanding of Islam, or your understanding of Islam. 

Be the parents that you should be, and that would be the best thing you can do.

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 5 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Hijab for women is the covering of everything, except for the face and hands. As far as when a woman is praying, she must also wear complete hijab, whether she is in public or she is all alone.

However, our esteemed jurists mention that the feet are exempted from being covered while praying. This means that when a woman is praying, it is not wajib for her to wear socks or cover her feet, unless she is in public or there is a non-mahram male who can see her. 

And Allah knows best.