48278

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 11 hours ago

The Qur'an says: "Allah prescribes for your children: for a male is equal the portion of two female" (4:11). Since the husband is obliged to spend for the maintenance of the family, his share of inheritance amounts double of that of the woman. The Qur'an also seems to indicate that such a rule is not subject to change in relation to the wife's job by saying: "These are the limits set by Allah" (4:13). A woman can decide if she wants to work, and if she does, she can spend all of her money for herself without sharing it with her husband because of the obligation of the maintenance. The husband, however, cannot abandon his duty to provide for his family. Therefore it is not unreasonable that men receive more inheritance than a women. Obviously a good and pious family is bound also by mutual understanding, love and cooperation, and it is up to the husband and wife to reach agreements and divide their financial support and daily tasks according to their situation.

With prayers for your success.

48311

One may say that the best du'a for forgiveness is the one preserved in the immutable text of the Qur'an 7:23 in the following words:

 قَالَا رَبَّنَا ظَلَمْنَا أَنفُسَنَا وَإِن لَّمْ تَغْفِرْ لَنَا وَتَرْحَمْنَا لَنَكُونَنَّ مِنَ الْخَاسِرِينَ 

They said, "Our Lord, we have wronged ourselves, and if You do not forgive us and have mercy upon us, we will surely be among the losers."

There are also many other supplications (ad'iya) available to any Muslim seeking forgiveness from Allah (swt) for one's sins and shortcomings. Many beautiful and eloquent expressions have been taught by the Prophet Muhammad (s) and his family the Ahl al-Bayt (a).

For instance, check out this Du'a of Repentance taught by Imam 'Ali Zayn al-'Abidin (a) who was the son of Imam al-Husayn b. 'Ali (a) and the fourth Imam.

48069

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 2 days ago

If there is no non-mahram man around and women do not attract men's attention by doing so, there is no problem; otherwise it should be avoided.

With prayers for your success.

48309

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 2 days ago

If a person has missed Fajr prayers and still should make-up for them, it is possible for him to join the Tarawih prayers during the month of Ramadan with such intention. His prayers would count as Qada prayers and not Tarawih. However keep in mind that congregational Tarawih prayers as we see nowadays in Sunni masjids were not performed by the Prophet. Also, Tarawih prayers are performed by units of four rakats while the Fajr prayer consists of only two rakats; you should therefore observe all the etiquettes of the prayers you must perform from the takbiratul-ihram to the final salam, two-by-two rakats, and not to mix anything with the Tarawih.

With prayers for your success.

48304

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 3 days ago

The Qur'an says: "The Prophet is closer to the believers than their own selves and his wives are their mothers" (33:6). What has been established by the Qur'an is the prohibition for men to marry the wives of the Prophet. The prohibition for a sayyedah to marry a non-sayyid is a wrong assumption and analogy. We don't find any instruction as such in the sunna of the Prophet and the teachings of the Imams after him. Rather what we find is the emphasis in choosing a religious and pious soulmate for a successful marriage leading to happiness in this world and everlasting bliss in the next one insh'Allah.

With prayers for your success.

48227

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 4 days ago

It has been reported in several Islamic sources that the Prophet have said angels do not enter a house in which there is a dog or paintings and sculptures of living beings (humans and animals). These words seems to indicate that keeping a dog in the house is discouraged in Islam but not a prohibition. It has also been reported that there is no problem in having hunting and shepherd dogs. What can be concluded is therefore the permissibility of keeping dogs in gardens or outside home although it is disliked to keep them in the house. Obviously, if the presence of a dog in the house would cause excessive hardships related to hygienic issues or matters of ritual purity, keeping them in the house would become impermissible.

With prayers for your success.

47161

Rebecca Masterton, Dr Rebecca Masterton graduated with a BA in Japanese Language and Literature; an MA in Comparative East Asian and African Literature and a PhD in Islamic literature of West Africa. She has been... Answered 4 days ago

Most scholars say that it is permissible for him to marry a second wife even if the first wife does not approve of it (unless stipulated in the marriage contract); however, as the Qur'an says, taking more than one wife depends upon a husband being equitable between wives.

48200

It prohibited to sell alcohol or to promote the selling and consumption of alcohol, or anything else that is haram.

Further to that, if one thinks of one's mission in life as including 'amr b'il-ma'ruf wa nahy 'an al-munkar, then one should actively prevent the advertising and promotion of anything that is harmful.

48235

Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answer updated 4 days ago

Thank you for your question. Spirituality is an essential aspect of the source literature (which are the bases of the true teachings of Islam), however, the term Sufism remains loosely defined in western scholarship and it has been the subject of much discussion.

The term invokes a specific reading of the history of mysticism,  its theology, its institutions and its practices and it can be argued that it is a predominantly Sunni account of spirituality in the Muslim world. Discussion of the sources of this tradition was an important question in the early study of Sufism and while some scholars claimed that the sources of Sufism were outside of the scriptural sources, others argued that they were rooted in them. The second opinion became more acceptable and early Companions of the Prophet (saw) were referred to as proto-Sufis, signifying that the Sufi tradition was a later development, while its sources firmly originated in Islam. 

Juxtaposing Shi'i to Sufism (Shi'i Sufism) may adequately describe some Shi'i expressions of Sufism, and indeed the term irfan was used by some seminarians in Iran to distinguish a tradition acceptable to the traditional seminary, different to these forms of Shi'i Sufism. The importance this form of irfan places on the divine law and its inner aspects, as well as in the more complex aspects of tawhid and walayah ensues that it provides a strong reading of the scriptural sources. It has also been argued that the Shi'i source literature has a mystical aspect of its own and is, therefore, the impetus of its own form of spirituality.

May you always be successful.  

48199

The term al-khilafa al-rashida (the rightly guided caliphate) was coined around or soon after the time of the civil wars that took place between Imam ‘Ali b. Abi Talib and his opponents.

It was designed to contrast the period of the first 3 caliphs, who were promoted as rightly guided, against the rule of 'Ali who was being denigrated by this comparison.

This will probably come as a surprise to our Sunni friends who clearly believe that ‘Ali is very much a part of the rashidun caliphs.

Yes it’s true today, but it wasn’t the case when this term was coined and the fictitious hadith was invented, amongst so many others, in order to give power to this anti-’Ali propaganda.

Here’s that work of fiction referred to in the question:

“Adhere to my sunnah and the sunnah of the rightly-guided successors after me. Hold on to it and cling on to it stubbornly.”

This narration is recorded by Abu Dawud, al-Tirmidhi and Ibn Majah.

A study of the various chains of narration shows multiple weak and unreliable characters. But notice these ones in particular and see if you can find a pattern.

  • Khalid b. Ma’dan b. Abi Karib al-Kitabi - Belonged to Hims, a Syrian town under the rule of Mu’awiya that was notorious for its people's enmity towards ‘Ali, and he was the chief of police of Yazid b. Mu’awiyah!
  • Thawr b. Yazid - Belonged to Hims as mentioned by al-Dhahabi (Mizan al-I’tidal, vol. 1, p. 374). As mentioned by Ibn Hajar ‘al-’Asqalani (Tahdhib al-Tahdhib, vol. 2, p. 34) he hated ‘Ali who had killed his father in a battle. ‘Abd Allah b. Mubarak refrained from narrating from him and considered him a heretic (fasid al­-madhhab).
  • Hajar b. Hajar al-Kila'i - Belonged to Hims and was considered of unknown standing as mentioned by Ibn Hajar al-’Asqalani in Tahdhib al-Tahdhib, vol. 3, p. 118.

So this fake hadith was put in circulation to undermine the legitimacy of ‘Ali. Later, after the fall of the Umayyads and the rise of the ‘Abbasid’s, Sunni theology and creed started to take shape. And the chapter of the hatred of ‘Ali was officially closed.

‘Ali was now considered the fourth of these rashidun caliphs.