Fajr

The Fajr prayer (Arabic: صلاة الفجر‎ ṣalāt al-fajr, "dawn prayer") an obligatory prayer ('Subuh' prayer) with two rakat (prescribed movements), and one of the five daily prayers offered by practising Muslims. Fajr means dawn in the Arabic language.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I am sure you as a Muslim know that worship and prayer is the greatest and most effective tool to battle anxiety and stress. As the holy Quran says, with the remembrance of God hearts will become tranquil. By someone seeing prayer as a burden or something that would hinder their mental stability, or even sleeping pattern, this shows they have not yet discovered what true faith and worship is. 

The best time to gain focus in life, or rizq, or mental and spiritual stability is fajr time. Adopting a healthy and religious sleeping pattern will enable one to get good sleep, and also fuflil their basic religious requirements. 

Of course, it will mean that one would have to change certain things in their daily routine, like avoiding things that keep them awake at night, avoiding caffeine, sleeping early, creating better atmosphere at home, and so on. 

There are many ways of getting your good sleep, and also performing fajr prayer in its proper time. This means that the problem is not fajr time disrupting the sleep, but rather having a better routine and stronger reliance in the Almighty.

With prayers for your success.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 5 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Fasting starts from 'fajr', and ends at 'maghreb'. This means that you are able to eat, drink, etc, until just before fajr time. The issue whether you are able to accurately and precisely say when fajr time starts. 

This is why the best thing to do is to stop a few minutes prior to fajr time, refraining from any of the invalidators of fasting. By doing this, you will be sure that you have not done anything that invalidates your fast.  

As for how many minutes this should be, that is up to you, as long as you are trying to be as accurate as possible, and observing as much precaution as possible. 

And Allah knows best.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 week ago

Yes it is valid as far as you did not take the medicine after Fajr time.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 week ago

If you were sure that the real Fajr has happened then you ate even after one second after Fajr, your fast will be invalid. If you ate because you were not sure whether Fajr has happened or not and you ate thinking it did not happene yet, then your fast is valid.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 weeks ago

Whenever the period starts, fasting is finished and not valid. She can eat and drink whenever she needs but it is not good to eat or drink in front of fasting persons or children who don't understand why she is not fasting.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

Yes it is Makrouh (Disliked) to sleep between Fajr and sunrise. Many authentic Hadeeths stated that it is recommended to be busy in that time ( between Fajr and sunrise) in prayers, Du'a, remembering Allah, reciting Quran and any useful deeds but not sleeping unless you are unwell or have another valid reason to sleep then. The benefits of being busy in that time in worship are too many including good health and more sustenance. Sleeping during that time might cause a diverse results on health and sustenance according to the Hadeeth. ( Manla Yahdharuhul Faqeeh, number 1439 and 1440)

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As you know, for us Muslims, prayer takes priority over absolutely everything. We plan our lives and our daily routine around prayer. We select our form of lifestyle and work based on how we can excel in our faith and get closer to God. 

Prayer, which is the most effective way to do this, must of course be done in its perfect form, and within its allocated time. 

Anything that becomes an obstacle for that, we must eliminate, even if it means loss of money or changing of work opportunity. 

In any job description, you are able to see if you can meet their requirements and also your religious requirements. If they do not give you any breaks, even toilet breaks, then in today's world that would be illegal and inhumane. 

I am sure you are able to find a few minutes, during your break, to perform your prayers, quickly, and get back to work. 

If under no circumstance are you able to take a break, or pray within the shar'i timeframe of the salat, then have trust in Allah ta'ala, who is the Razzaq, and pursue other work opportunities that would suit your Islamic values and human rights as well. 

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 8 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

This is a matter of diference in opinion among our esteemed jurists, and therefore you must refer to your Marja' taqleed. 

However, it is indeed less confusing and more simple if prayers are redone on a day by day Qadha'. Starting with Dhuhr, and ending with Fajr, and ticking each day off as you go along. 

And Allah knows best.

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 8 months ago

as salam alaikum

if by "little late" is meant that your parents miss the best time for prayer (waqt al-fadilah), meaning just as enters the adhan time, there is no problem in praying at different times as long as everybody prays before sunset. However it would be appropriate to pray Jama'ah and even better to pray Jama'ah at the mosque if there is the possibility.

With prayers of your success.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 9 months ago

Yes. Recommended Prayers especially Salat al-Layl ( Night prayer) is highly recommended for every one including those who have unfulfilled Qadha  prayers on them. No doubt, the reward of performing Qadha prayers is much more than the reward of recommended prayers. 
You must perform every prayer within its time and never miss any obligatory prayer.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 10 months ago

Yes, she has to perform Qadha for Morning Prayer which she missed after being clear from the menstruation. She should have performed Tayammum and prayed on the time of Morning Prayer if Ghusl was not possible.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 11 months ago

It is not allowed for a Muslim to deliberately delay his Prayer till its time goes away. Muslim must do every thing possible to wake up and perform Fajr Prayer withing its time.

If he is ill and could not get up for the Prayer, he must perform it as Qadha later on. 

Wassalam.