Knowledge

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 3 weeks ago

There isn't a fixed yes or no answer to this question - it depends on your circumstances and yourself.

Personally, I think it is extremely helpful for people going into the study of Islam to have another career or vocation. This keeps you from financial dependency or desperation and makes you more free to study what you like for however long you feel is beneficial. This is especially if you are female and financially responsible for yourself or others, since men have certain financial opportunities that women don't; for instance, most imams of mosques are men, and usually men have more opportunities for paid services such as tabligh and majalis. 

Then, in the future, if the opportunity arises, you could shift to work in the area of Islamic studies, or full-time studies, if that is what seems right. 

So, you could try to do both - that is, maintain a separate job or career path, and do Islamic studies part-time on the side. (If you are not already doing this, and if you have the time and energy for it, of course - it is a commitment.) This would also allow you to see if it is right for you; for instance, some people think they want to go to hawza or do full time Islamic studies, but then decide after a couple years that it's not the right thing for them, and then sometmes it is a lot of work to get back onto a different career track.

Of course, the drawback is that you will miss out on an immersive experience, such as living at a hawza, but it can be a good way to feel things out. 

You could consider what career you might pursue after your studies - for instance, working at a mosque, chaplaincy, university teaching,  madrasa teaching, writing/translation, counselling, tabligh, or something completely different - and how available work is in that area, and much you would expect to earn.

You could also consider your skill sets that you would use after your studies - for instance, whether you feel most comfortable with things like leadership, management, oratory, social work, academics, and so forth. Of course, sometimes we discover that through experience. 

Conversely, you could also look at yourself as an engineer - is it something that suits you and feel like you would miss if you left it and see a future for yourself in, or is it something you don't think you would get much further with or feel blocked in.

If you are 100% committed to pursuing Islamic studies, don't worry about negativity from people around you; however, it is still good to pay attention to some of the practical considerations they might bring up. 

Similarly, if you are 100% committed to pursuing Islamic studies, then I would say just trust in Allah and go forward with it. The above advice is for if you are not certain. 

Sometimes, Allah makes the decision easy for us by forcing us one way or the other! However, in the meantime, of course, pray for guidance and talk to people around you. 

Allah does sustains us, but the reality is that many people who work in this area suffer from financial frustrations, unless they have a secure and suitably paying position of some sort, or other resources (inheritance, investments, etc). 

I will leave you with a short story. Back in my younger years, when I was attending university, I used to study computer science (which was very competitive to get into and we were considered the lucky ones who were on top of the world). I decided that I was going to pursue Islamic studies and begin that by changing my major to Near Eastern Studies (the closest thing to Islamic Studies).

So, I went to one of our professors, a well-known Muslim, and told him the good news. "I'm going to change to a Near Eastern Studies major," I said.

He looked at me and said just one word. "DON'T."

Anyway, I did it anyway, but I have come to understand why he said what he did. 
 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

The Twelve Infallible Imams from Ahlul Bayt (AS) did inherit the knowledge of the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA). That is why, their status is from his status as Allah says in Quran ذُرِّيّةً بَعْضُها مِن بَعض A Progeny (of the Prophet) which part from him. Their status is higher than everyone except the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) who is The Highest over all creatures.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

Following Ahlul Bayt is in fact following the real teachings of the Prophet (SAWA). None of the four Sunni sects (Hanafi, Shafi'ee, Maaliki and Hanbali) were existing during the time of the Prophet, while Ahlul Bayt were living with the Prophet and practicing his teachings.

Details of the rules and worship can be easily found in many websites e.g. www.Sistani.org and www.Al-Islam.org and www.shiasearch.org

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 2 months ago

There are hundreds of useful books in many websites e.g. Kitab Al-Irshad by Al-Shaikh Al-Mufeed, The Right Path by Sharafuddin, Then I was Guided by Dr Tijani, Peshawar Nights by Sultan Al-Wa'izeen, and many others.

These websites www.Al-Islam.org

www.shiasearch.og

www.Rafed.net

www.aqaed.com 

have also many useful books.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I would like to direct you to something I wrote on my website regarding your important question. Although it is long, but it will hopefully explain this misconception in detail. 

http://www.sheikh-alsalami.org.au/2021/12/25/twelver-shiism-and-answerin...

With prayers for your success.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 7 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If your parents are anti-vaccination, or against the Covid vaccine specifically, and they do not wish to take the vaccination due to a medical condition, which you also suffer from, and out of fear of you getting worse, then you must consult with a specialist and see what they recommend. 

If your parents are against Covid for any other reason, and not due to health difficulties you suffer from, then it would not be a sin if you take the vaccine without their knowledge. However, if they have specifically said to you that they will, for example, disown you if you get it, etc, then I would suggest you try to rationalise with them to avoid problems.

With prayers for your success. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 10 months ago

Ignorance can be unavoidable and can be avoidable. Unavoidable ignorance is of those who have to access to knowledge like those who live and die in far away forests or remote areas with out any access to learning or asking knowledgeable persons. Unavoidable ignorance  is not entitled to punishment because it was imposed on the ignorant and he had no choice.
Avoidable ignorance is a result of laziness or not caring to gain knowledge. Such ignorance is not pardoned. The narration states that sinful person will told on the Day of Judgement : Why did you fail to do good? He replies: I did not know. He will told: Why did you fail to learn? Then he will be punished.

'This means that gaining compulsory knowledge is also compulsory and those who were able to gain it,byte they opt to ignore or don't care for gaining the compulsory knowledge are responsible about their ignorance, unlike those ignorant who had no access at all to knowledge.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 11 months ago

The whole knowledge of The Unseen (Al-Ghaib) is with Allah (SWT) (Say: None in the heavens and the earth knows The (whole) Ghalib ( The Unseen) except Allah). (Sura 27, verse 65) and He grants whatever He wants to whomever He wants from His humble servants some part of that knowledge. Some prophets  get more than other prophets depending the degree of knowledge, dedication and humbleness. The greatest degree is for the Best Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) and his Holy Progeny Ahlul Bayt (AS). Allah (SWT) granted some prophets more degree than other prophets (We have granted some prophets more degrees than other prophets) (Sura 17, verse 55). The gift of the knowledge of unseen from Allah (SWT) will vary between prophet to another prophet.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

The status and knowledge of the Prophet Muhammad ( SAWA) is the greatest above all the Prophets. His Progeny are from him as Allah says in Quran ( A Progeny (of the Prophet) from him and he is from them (3:34).

The knowledge of the Prophet Muhammad is higher than the knowledge of all previous prophets. Since his Progeny inherited and got his knowledge, their knowledge is higher than all human beings except the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA).

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Islam allows studying and learning any useful knowledge in any science from non Muslims. The history of Muslims has lot of examples of non Muslim scientists in medicine and other worldly sciences who were active in Muslim society.

Muslims are not allowed to take religious knowledge from non Muslims.

Wassalam.

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 1 year ago

as salam alaikum

The Qur'an does not ascribe such attribute to the Prophet. There are other attributes that Allah uses to describe the noble Prophet like "gentle" (ra'uf) and "merciful" (rahim).

With prayers for your success. 

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 1 year ago

This is referring to Qur'an 36:12 and there is some discussion here:

https://www.al-islam.org/ask/what-is-the-full-significance-and-historica...

If the phrase "imam mubeen" is understood to refer to a human Imam, such as Imam 'Ali, there is no reason why it has to refer to a human Imam who is presently living since the souls of humans exist after death, and the Qur'an states that martyrs are alive. Although, of course, it could, and God knows best.