Muslims

Muslims (Arabic: مُسلِم‎) are people who follow or practice Islam, a monotheistic Abrahamic religion. Muslims consider the Quran, their holy book, to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to the Islamic prophet and messenger Muhammad, may peace be upon him and his family. Muslims also generally follow the teachings and practices of Muhammad (sunnah). Those who obtain these teachings primarily from his Companions (sahaba) are called Sunni, and those who take them from his family (ahl al-bayt) are called the Shi'a.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 3 weeks ago

This matter has different opinions among the  Maraaji' of Taqleed who are the highest in Islamic knowledge. Many of them e.g. Ayatullah Sistani and Ayatullah Sayyed Sa'eed al-Hakeem say that non Muslims are not allowed to enter Masjid according to obligatory precaution but they are allowed to inter all other religious places like Islamic centers and Husainiyya and Imam bargah etc.

'Other Scholars e.g. Ayatullah Kho'ee and Ayatullah Waheed Khurasani say that non Muslims are allowed to enter usual Masjids "except Masjid al-Haraam " if they don't carry with them any item which can make the Masjid Najis.

Wassalam.

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Mateen Charbonneau, Sheikh Mateen Joshua Charbonneau achieved a certificate from Harvard University in Islamic Studies. He undertook Howza classes under esteemed scholars since 2013 and has been teaching at Imam Mahdi... Answered 1 month ago

There is a very beneficial video series about the topic here:

https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD2F0DFA18BFBD747

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

Yes, it is permissible as far as there is no strong possibility of risk on their life. They need to seek scientific experts' advice.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

As far as your students are from general public who can use the knowledge in good way, and you do not know for sure that they will misuse it in unlawful ways, you are permitted to teach them and give them your skill. If you are sure that a specific group of people will use the skill in unlawful work, then you should refrain from helping them to do unlawful work.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

It depends on fulfilling the agreement between the Muslim government and the non Muslims. Both are bound to abide to the agreed terms and conditions.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

Muslims living or visiting non Muslim countries are required to respect the law of the land as well as follow the day to day Islamic rules. Punishments described in Sharia on certain crimes are not the responsibility of individual Muslims, but it is the responsibility of the Muslim ruler who implements real Islamic teachings and provides justice for all people in the society. After providing justice for all, then the matter of punishment comes, and that is the responsibility  of the government which provides justice for all. 
In today's circumstances where there is no real Islamic justice for all, there is no question of implementing Sharia punishment in non Muslim countries.

Wassalam.

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 5 months ago

as salam alaikum

the four Sunni schools of jurisprudence are related to practical laws and therefore they are not directly linked to doctrinal and theological issues (although sometimes we see some affiliations).

Theologically, Sunni schools can be divided in three main branches: Ash'aris, Maturidis and Ahl al-Hadith.

The Sunni-Shia debate have been dealt in different way by different scholars belonging to these branches. Therefore the judgment more often goes back to ulama, or groups of ulama, and not to the schools themselves. Also, it may depends on what Shi'i trend they refer as their judgments may differs from a Shi'i approach or group to another.

We certainly see some Sunnis very staunch against Shi'ism while others are more tolerant. The same goes for the Shias towards Sunnis. So it is prudent not to generalize and analyze single groups and opinions from case to case.

With prayers for your success.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 5 months ago

Non Muslims who respect the rules of the Muslim society will enjoy full protection from Muslims and have their full religious freedom as far as they do not break the rules of the society. No Muslim has right to attack any worship place belongs to non Muslims. 

Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 7 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Once somebody asked Imam Ali (as) if he had seen God. He said "Why would I worship a Lord who I haven't seen." on the further probing of the questioner as to how that was possible the Imam said: "I did not see Him with my eyes, but I saw Him with the realities of faith." The modern world is deeply affected by logical positivism, which considers only that which can be sensed by the five senses as real. With such an outlook one can never be sure about anything metaphysical, as, by definition, the metaphysical is outside of the realm of the five senses. But so too are other phenomena that we all accept to be true, such as consciousness, and this is why logical positivism is not a tenable set of presuppositions with which to understand the world.

Rather, the metaphysical is sensed by other senses within a person and in the Islamic tradition, those senses are usually called the heart. It is the heart that senses God and this is sometimes referred to as religious experience. Through the journey of faith a person becomes more and more certain about God, through a process of incremental interactions, prayer, and appreciation of His Hand in their lives. The wisdom that is contained in His religion and the inimitability of the Qur'an. In a more advanced understanding of belief, the presuppositions that a Muslim chooses to accept mean that there is no alternative other than the existence of God and through the spiritual journey they witness the truth of their progression. God Himself guides them to the paths of certainty after which there is no doubt.

May you always be successful

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 7 months ago

In the Sunni hadith books, especiallly Bukhari and Muslim, it is mentioned that children should not go out at/after maghrib for fear of shayateen. Among some Sunnis, it is customary to discourage women or children in particular from going out then or at night. 

Perhaps this developed in part also due to a practical safety concern (that generally it is less safe outside at night, and in many places, women and children are cautious about going out alone at night). Also in those days they had less lighting. 

This idea is not commonly found in the Shi'i tradition, and Shi'is generally do not accept the contents of Bukhari and Muslim as authentic without further investigation. I am not saying that this narration doesn't possibly exist anywhere in Shi'i books, since there are thousands and thousands of Shi'i narrations, but it isn't generally given consideration a religious basis. (Of course, culturally, some Shi'is may discourage some people from going outside for social or safety reasons, but that is different.)

Anyway, the Prophet and Imams went outside at night when it was appropriate to do so. 

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 7 months ago

Allah says in the Qur'an that the only thing that will not be forgiven is that partners be associated with Allah, and that Allah forgives whatever else Allah wills.

Allah also says in the Qur'an that whoever believes and works righteous deeds, including Jews, Christians, and Sabeans, will have a good afterlife.

With that in mind, how can someone exclude some people from heaven just because they are not Shi'i (or Shi'i Ithna Ashari)? 

Only Allah has the authority and power to send people to heaven or hell. 

Nowadays, also, people often follow religions or sects due to inherited understandings and doctrines. A Sunni who loves certain individuals (who do not have the same status among Shi'is) does so because they have heard very good things about them, or because they believe the Prophet (S) loves them, not because they are trying to fight against the Imams or support wrong.

It is a different situation for someone who actually was alive during the time of Imam 'Ali (A) and saw him and rejected him or physically fought against him. Anyway most Sunnis, and most or all Sufis, respect Imam 'Ali and other Imams, they just have a different understanding of their role. 

However, following the teachings of Ahl al-Bayt (A) through the Imams can help develop one's ethics, actions, and spirituality in such a way that can, insha'allah, help with going to heaven. Also one can hope for the intercession of the Imams (A) if one has a close relationship to them and is dedicated to them, and this is also an invaluable gift. 

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 7 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. While the previous prophets (as) all followed the essence of Islam, which is submission to Allah, they had their own divine laws and were not called Muslims. A Muslim is a term given to those people who follow the divine law as transmitted by the final prophet Muhammad (saw). For this reason, the believers who followed the previous prophets are not outwardly called Muslims, even if the essence of their religion is submission (islam) and the reality of the practice of that essence makes them one who has submitted (muslim).

May you always be successful