Daughter

A daughter is a female offspring- a girl or woman in relation to her parents. Daughterhood is the state of being someone's daughter. The male counterpart is a son.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 weeks ago

If your adult daughters find it difficult to wear full Hijab at home in front of the Non Mahram man, you must protect them from falling in sin of being seem by him with out full Hijab. You must arrange for him another place to live, away from your adult daughters.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

No share for the deceased son or daughter nor to their children after them as far as they died before their parents. When a person dies leaving his own children, and grandchildren, direct children only have the right to inherit from him as far as they were alive when the parent died. Those who died before their parents have no right in inheritance unless all the children have dies before their parents, then their children will inherit from their grand parents because no direct son or daughter are alive.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

No one has any right in inheriting from this man but his own two daughters and his wife if she was alive when he passed away. Wife should  get one eighth and rest should be equally divided between the two daughters. If no wife was alive when he passed away, then all the property and wealth should be dived equally between his two daughters only. No one else from the relatives is entitled for any inheritance from him. This is according to Ahlul Bayt (AS) who have the real teachings of the Prophet (SAWA). Sunni brothers have something different which prevents the daughters and give to other male relatives, which is away from Quran and Real Sunnah.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

You need to keep in touch with her and treat her nicely being a practicing Muslim so that she will see the great manners of Islam. You should try to invite her to Islam as and when you find a suitable chance. Her being non Muslim does not mean always that she denied Islam deliberately. She might had been a victim of ignorance or misleading propaganda.

You should do your best to give the practical evidence that Islam is the best religion.
Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 4 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Although each circumstance is different, a starting point, after making sure you and your spouse are on the same page, may be to have a clear conversation with your inlaws to find out why they are uncomfortable with your daughter wearing hijab. The second step would then be to make absolutely clear that this is something you would like for your child and that you are not happy with any type of discouraging. In short, it is important to set a clear boundaries and if that boundary is not respected then you can think of the next appropriate action. 
 

May you always be successful 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 5 months ago

Two thirds of what he left goes to the son, and one third goes to the daughter. This is if he left only one son and one daughter only with out wife. If he left a wife, she gets one eighth, then the remaining should be made in three equal shares, two shares for the son and one share for the daughter.

Wassalam.

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Seyed Ali Shobayri, Seyed Ali Shobayri is of mixed Iranian and Scottish descent who found the path of the Ahlul Bayt (a) by his own research. He holds a BA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University through the... Answered 5 months ago

Bismillah, 

Asalamu Alaykom, 

Yes this is allowed. 
 

May Allah grant you success 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

Waking up for eating or drinking in Sehri (Sohoor) is not a condition in fasting. Fasting is must on Baaligh Muslim whether they wake up or don't wake up for Sehri.

Baaligh girl ( who completed full nine lunar years) must fast the month of Ramadan. Not fasting is a major sin which requires then Qadha of that day, and Kaffara of fasting two months or feeding of sixty poor believers, for every day of not fasting.

Giving Kaffara does not make it permissible.

'Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 7 months ago

Permissibility presupposes possibility, and it is generally not possible to force someone in their late teens or beyond to do something, except when they are physically in your presence.

Assuming your daughter has her own life outside the home (for instance, attending school or university, a job, socializing, or that sort of thing), it is unlikely that you could successfully force her to wear hijab; often, people of that age in that situation will simply wear hijab when going out the door and then take it off once they get to school, or wherever.

(An exception would be in a place where wearing hijab is the norm, and not wearing hijab outdoors would attract a lot of attention, in which case I would definitely consider it prudent to push a young woman to wear hijab, but I am assuming that this is not your situation.)

As you say, adults react poorly to compulsion, and will usually turn against anything they are forced to do. 

While this may or may not be relevant, it is worth keeping in mind that women sometimes change their hairstyles (or hijab-styles) as a reflection of other life changes - such a change in family status (a broken engagement, a parent's divorce/remarriage, etc), a change in their inner outlook and sense of who they are, or life challenges. So, sometimes, the hijab in and of itself is not really the main thing that is going on, even if it is the most visible one.

It might be worth interrogating why hijab is leading to a dislike of Islam itself. Are there women around who wear hijab who are behaving poorly? Are you living in a place where hijab is stigmatized? Does she just want to express herself more through her clothes or live a different kind of lifestyle? Is it just teenage rebellion? There are all sorts of scenarios, many of which have nothing to do with actual fiqh rulings about hijab.

In any case, discussing the underlying issues - which hijab is often symbolic of - and trying to come to some sort of agreement with her about her clothing might be more fruitful. 

 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 8 months ago

In Quranic verses, plural was sometimes used for one person like in the Verse of Mobahala ( Sura Aal Imran; verse 61) ( Let us call our sons and your sons, our women and your women, and ourselves and yourselves) The Prophet (SAWA) called Fatima only for his women and called Ali only for ourselves.

Authentic evidence supports that Fatima was the only real daughter of the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) while had three fostered daughters who were orphaned daughters of Hala Bint Khowailid sister of Lady Khadija (AS).

Justice of the Prophet (SAWA) will never allow discrimination in dealing with the three fostered daughters wihle all the focus of the Prophet was on Fatima.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I think the initial response you would probably hear is be patient, he is probably under pressure, try not to take sides, and so on. 

However, if such a man has no consideration for religious teachings or moral conduct, then the only solution is authority. Once upon a time elders would intervene, and such a husband/father would be deterred and feel ashamed, resulting in stopping such behaviour. Unfortunately, our communities do not have that level of respect anymore. 

It starts with your mother, as she needs to have the courage and ability to leave him. She must know that by her staying in this relationship she is exposing her children to violence, trauma and irreversible damage. She probably comes from a mindset that no matter what, the husband/father can do anything, but this is extremely wrong and damaging. 

By contacting the authorities, although your mother, or even some family members would be upset with you, but you are stopping and preventing harm upon your mother and your siblings. 

The police, social workers, court, etc will be able to give something to him that you or your mother cannot, and that is help. He needs help, for anger management, maybe for mental stability. Maybe just a reminder that he cannot get away with this kind of oppressive behaviour, and so on. 

You will certainly be doing the right thing and bring this to an end.

These are my views on domestic violence and living with someone who systematically and continuously abuses family members. Of course, you should try to consult with someone close to you, and reach out for help, and also pray for your father as well. 

In shaa Allah other specialists in this forum will give suggestions and advice to you as well.

With prayers for your success. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Her husband gets one quarter. The remaining three quarters goes to the son and daughter who were alive when the woman died. Two shares for the son and one share for the daughter. 
If the daughter had already passed away before her mother, the son will get the three quarters.

Wassalam.