Daughter

A daughter is a female offspring- a girl or woman in relation to her parents. Daughterhood is the state of being someone's daughter. The male counterpart is a son.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 days ago

Waking up for eating or drinking in Sehri (Sohoor) is not a condition in fasting. Fasting is must on Baaligh Muslim whether they wake up or don't wake up for Sehri.

Baaligh girl ( who completed full nine lunar years) must fast the month of Ramadan. Not fasting is a major sin which requires then Qadha of that day, and Kaffara of fasting two months or feeding of sixty poor believers, for every day of not fasting.

Giving Kaffara does not make it permissible.

'Wassalam.

112948

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 1 month ago

Permissibility presupposes possibility, and it is generally not possible to force someone in their late teens or beyond to do something, except when they are physically in your presence.

Assuming your daughter has her own life outside the home (for instance, attending school or university, a job, socializing, or that sort of thing), it is unlikely that you could successfully force her to wear hijab; often, people of that age in that situation will simply wear hijab when going out the door and then take it off once they get to school, or wherever.

(An exception would be in a place where wearing hijab is the norm, and not wearing hijab outdoors would attract a lot of attention, in which case I would definitely consider it prudent to push a young woman to wear hijab, but I am assuming that this is not your situation.)

As you say, adults react poorly to compulsion, and will usually turn against anything they are forced to do. 

While this may or may not be relevant, it is worth keeping in mind that women sometimes change their hairstyles (or hijab-styles) as a reflection of other life changes - such a change in family status (a broken engagement, a parent's divorce/remarriage, etc), a change in their inner outlook and sense of who they are, or life challenges. So, sometimes, the hijab in and of itself is not really the main thing that is going on, even if it is the most visible one.

It might be worth interrogating why hijab is leading to a dislike of Islam itself. Are there women around who wear hijab who are behaving poorly? Are you living in a place where hijab is stigmatized? Does she just want to express herself more through her clothes or live a different kind of lifestyle? Is it just teenage rebellion? There are all sorts of scenarios, many of which have nothing to do with actual fiqh rulings about hijab.

In any case, discussing the underlying issues - which hijab is often symbolic of - and trying to come to some sort of agreement with her about her clothing might be more fruitful. 

 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

In Quranic verses, plural was sometimes used for one person like in the Verse of Mobahala ( Sura Aal Imran; verse 61) ( Let us call our sons and your sons, our women and your women, and ourselves and yourselves) The Prophet (SAWA) called Fatima only for his women and called Ali only for ourselves.

Authentic evidence supports that Fatima was the only real daughter of the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) while had three fostered daughters who were orphaned daughters of Hala Bint Khowailid sister of Lady Khadija (AS).

Justice of the Prophet (SAWA) will never allow discrimination in dealing with the three fostered daughters wihle all the focus of the Prophet was on Fatima.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 5 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I think the initial response you would probably hear is be patient, he is probably under pressure, try not to take sides, and so on. 

However, if such a man has no consideration for religious teachings or moral conduct, then the only solution is authority. Once upon a time elders would intervene, and such a husband/father would be deterred and feel ashamed, resulting in stopping such behaviour. Unfortunately, our communities do not have that level of respect anymore. 

It starts with your mother, as she needs to have the courage and ability to leave him. She must know that by her staying in this relationship she is exposing her children to violence, trauma and irreversible damage. She probably comes from a mindset that no matter what, the husband/father can do anything, but this is extremely wrong and damaging. 

By contacting the authorities, although your mother, or even some family members would be upset with you, but you are stopping and preventing harm upon your mother and your siblings. 

The police, social workers, court, etc will be able to give something to him that you or your mother cannot, and that is help. He needs help, for anger management, maybe for mental stability. Maybe just a reminder that he cannot get away with this kind of oppressive behaviour, and so on. 

You will certainly be doing the right thing and bring this to an end.

These are my views on domestic violence and living with someone who systematically and continuously abuses family members. Of course, you should try to consult with someone close to you, and reach out for help, and also pray for your father as well. 

In shaa Allah other specialists in this forum will give suggestions and advice to you as well.

With prayers for your success. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

Her husband gets one quarter. The remaining three quarters goes to the son and daughter who were alive when the woman died. Two shares for the son and one share for the daughter. 
If the daughter had already passed away before her mother, the son will get the three quarters.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

It is Not true. No marriage took place between Umar and daughter of Imam Ali (AS). Fabricated narrations in this regard have been refuted by authentic evidence. Allama Nassir Husain son of Allama Haamid Husain has written a full book ( إفحام الأعداء والخصوم) in which he has mentioned authentic evidence that the whole story of the claimed marriage was fabricated by the enemies of Ahlul Bayt then mentioned by Ibn Sa'd in his book al-Tabaqaat. Ibn Sa'd was pro Umayyad rulers.

'Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

The shrine of Sakina is in Dariyya near Damascus. It has been reconstructed recently by Allama Sayyed Ahmad al-Wahedi  who has compiled number of narrations supporting that Sakina was a daughter of Imam Ali (AS) and Fatima (AS) including:

1. A narration in Mustadrak Safeenatul Bihar by al-Namazi, vol.5 , p.90 in which imam Zainul Abideen (AS) narrated from Sakina about the greatness of Fatimah (AS).

2. In Amaali al-Tousi a narration from Imam Husain (AS) mentioning Sakina his my sister (Wasa'il al-Shia by al-Hurr al-'Aamili , v. 14, p.168).

3. In Biharul Anwaar (v.45, p.104), a narration that Ameerul Mo'mineen (AS) called all his children by their names to say fair well to their mother Fatimah (AS) before her burial and mentioned Sakina among them. 
Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 7 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

It is very important for us as parents to teach our children independence and self-reliance as early as possible. It is not only good for the child's personality, building their life skills and self-esteem, but it is also good for the parents as well.

We can see how Islam encourages us to categorise the different stages of growth a child goes through, and to cater to each stage in its correct way. 

If your child does not have any physical difficulties that would impede her from doing these things on her own, it is highly encouraged from now to start teaching her these things so she can do them on her own. 

The more you delay it, the more difficult it will be for her to learn. Start with toilet training, getting her to learn how to clean herself, on her own. Then gradually give her the confidence that she can shower by herself, and so on. 

As for sleeping, I am sure you know how important it is for each child to sleep separately, on their own. Try to read about this topic from the viewpoint expert child psychologists. 

With prayers for your success. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 7 months ago

The father is responsible to provide livelihood expenses for his children till that are able to earn or be away from need. 
Some fathers who don't live with their children think that they are not in need. You need to inform your father clearly that you need his support for your livelihood expenses. After informing him, he should respond, but if he does not, then try to talk to persons who have influence on him to remind him about his responsibility towards his own daughter. You can also request the religious authority who is Marje of Taqleed or his representative to ask your father to fulfill his duty.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 9 months ago

Lineage of the family name comes from the father hence every one belongs to the family of his father. Daughters belong to their father's family. Fatima (SA) is the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) and all her children and grand children belong to the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) being their great grand father.

'Wassalam.
 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 9 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

A "step-father" should aim at trying to become a father figure for his wife's children, and treat them like his own children. One positive way of treating children is by showing affection and loving care, through kissing the children, hugging them, and treating them in the best way possible. 

And Allah knows best. 

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 11 months ago

Regarding whether he had a daughter named Fatima in Madina, there is some discussion here: https://www.al-islam.org/ask/what-information-is-available-on-the-life-o...

Historians do not agree on how many children Imam Husain had. However, this is a good summary of what various authors have said: https://en.wikishia.net/view/Imam_al-Husayn_b._%27Ali_(a)#Wives_and_Children

Hope that helps - history is a challenging subject!