House

A house is a building that functions as a home.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 weeks ago

Yes. It is allowed to pet a baby panda in your house like cat or bird, but you need to be careful about rules of Taharah and Nijasah.

Wassalam 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

I have not seen any one who claims that Imam Ali's house water is bitter. Nevertheless, even if some claims that, it does not harm the sacred status of the place. The location of the house is near the river of Furat. Sometimes the water level in the river is high and sometimes it is low or even very low. That can be a possible reason of change in the taste of the water. It is worth mentioning that the house was never owned by Imam Ali (AS) but by his nephew (Jo'dah ibn Hubairah جعدة بن هبيرة)and Imam Ali (AS) was just a temporary tenant in that house.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

There would not be any shar'i problem with changing places, as long as there is no intention in desecrating the sanctity of this holy time of mourning. 

It would be advisable, if it is possible, to postpone until after Ashura, and to continue to allocate time for your 'azaa` and dedication in mourning for Imam Husain (a.s.). 

With prayers for your success. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 3 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

A healthy spousal relationship is based primarily on communication. The husband and wife must discuss whatever is needed between them, and inform each other what they want, what they like/dislike, what their expectations are, and so on. 

Anything that contributes to keeping the marriage stable must be discussed. 

If husband and wife have a mutual understanding on leaving the house, where to go, where not to go, when to return, who to see, who not to see, etc., then many problems will be avoided.

The husband can give a general consent to the wife, and that is usually what happens, unless he turns to become an oppressive controlling man, which not only will he become miserable, so will the marriage. 

So, a husband can say to his wife, if you need to visit your family, or go to the mosque, or visit a dr, or go shopping, you don't need to wait for my approval. Just leave me a note, or ring/message me.

Such a scenario is absolutely fine. This would be ideal, and with good communication both sides will be happy. The ruling of a wife leaving the house only with consent of husband is not something that should be misused or manipulated. 

Also, if a husband knows by leaving the house for a certain purpose or a certain time, or staying out too much will upset his wife, then morally he should not do so, and it will certainly jeopardise his relationship. 

As the verse 3 of Surah al-Nisa` says: عاشِرُوهُنَّ بِالْمَعْرُوف

A wife is not like a school student, and must not be treated as someone immature. The more independent family members are, the wiser they become and more responsible as well. 

More can be said about this, but I will suffice with this brief answer. 

And Allah knows best. 

As the verse says: 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

Yes we can perform it at home. It is not compulsory to perform it under the sky.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

The attack on the house of Fatima Zahra (AS) has been admitted by leading Sunni leaders including Abu Bakr himself who openly said when he was about to die that I wish that I did not attack the house of Fatima even if it was a center  of war against me. This is narrated by eminent Sunni scholars like:

1. Al-Tabarani in al-Mo'jam al-Kabeer , 

2. al-Dhahabi  in Meesan al-E'tidaal,

3. Ibn Qutaiba and quoted by Ibn A'bd Rabbih in his book al-E'qd al-Fareed.

4. al-Mas'oodi in amorous al-Dhahab.

5. Ibn Asaakir in Tareekh Dimishq.

6. al-Haithami in Majma' al-Zawaa'id.

7. al-Soyouti in Musnad Fatimah 

8. al-Muttaqi al-Hindi in Kanz al-Ummaal.

Beside this, we have hundreds of Sunni books who narrated about the attack and fire to burn the house or door of Fatimah e.g.

1. Tareekh al-Tabari , V.2, P. 443.

2. Mussannaf Abi Shaibah, V. 8, P. 572.

3. al-E'qd al-Fareed , V.2, P. 73.

4. Ibn Abd al-Barr in al-Estee'aab, V. 1, P. 298.

5. al-Waafi bil Wafayaat by al-Safari, V.2, P.227.

6. Kanzul Ummah , V.5, P.651.

7. Abul-Fidaa' in al-Mukhtasar Fi aakhbaar al- Bashar, V.1, P.107.

8. Ibn Taymiyyah (the staunch enemy of Ahlul Bayt) in his book Minhajul Sunnah, V.8, P. 291.

9.Ibn Hajar al-A'sqalani in Lisaan al-Mizan, V.1, P.111.

10. al-Dhahbi in Milan al-E'tidaal, V.1, P. 139 and in Siyar A'laam al-Nubalaa', V. 15, P. 578.

11. Al-Tabarani in al-Mo'jam al-Kabeer , V.1, P. 17.

12, Al-Haithami on Mo'jam al-Zawaa'id, V.2, P. 353.

and many other Sunni sources.

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 5 months ago

You should not invite them to your house as Islamic law strongly discourages or condemns the situation where a woman and a non-mahram male are alone together. (Whether you would be alone in the house or alone in a room.) There is no need for them to be at your house. This will prevent any sort of problems.

Also remember that your intentions are only your own, and you don't have any guarantee about what the other person is intending or experiencing. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 6 months ago

Sahm e Sadat is the right of pious needy Sadat. If the person is poor, pious Sayyed then you can give him from Sahm e Sadat.

'Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 9 months ago

This subject has been broached here, and perhaps the fact that you are asking about it will encourage others to add some thoughts on it.

https://www.al-islam.org/ask/why-does-a-husband-have-the-power-in-islam-...

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 1 year ago

The person who is asking this may be familiar with the jurisprudential model. That is, insofar as it is the husband's right to have physical intimacy, he can prevent the wife from leaving the home (because this might interfere with his right). And his right is due to being the breadwinner and the wife being a financial dependent.

This is obviously a theoretical or idealized model of a marriage and doesn't take into account the varieties of how people live as well as the nuances of real life (for instance, that, oftentimes, the man isn't the sole breadwinner, and/or that the household labour that woman often do is equally important to the survival of the household or children; and, generally, both men and women have an interest in physical intimacy).

In practice, I would say that most men do not imprison their wives and don't do this literally. But, occasionally, a man does do that in the name of Islam, thereby depriving the wife of opportunities for seeing family or friends, education, attending religious gatherings, and knowing what is happening in society. And, in the context of the religious community, it is very difficult for anyone to object; a woman fears that if she disobeys him and goes outside, she will go to hell. (I had a friend in the US who was kept inside by her husband for decades; after he passed away, she didn't even know what an ATM/cash machine was). And this can be especially harmful if a girl marries young. Of course, in some places, this is also done because of lack of security in society and fear for the wife's safety, and this should also be acknowledged (that is, it isn't always due to overdominance).

Furthermore, the fact that a wife has to ask for permission to leave could be seen as demeaning to her dignity. I am sure most men would not tolerate it if someone told them they could only move about with a woman's permission!

As you might glean from my response, I am not in favour of this paradigm, and I am more in favour of the late Sayed Fadlullah's view that marriage should not be imprisonment, and that this particular ruling should be reconsidered. Sometimes, we just pass on things from the classical era without questioning them (such as the ruling of purity of Ahl al-Kitab, which was questioned in the modern era) until the time comes when we realize we do need to give it another look. I don't think the Prophet intended to disadvantage women, especially since so much of his message was about social reform and he had a special concern for improving the situation of women. And when we look at hadith from the time of the Prophet (S), we see that women were quite involved in what was happening around them and in the community of the Prophet (S), rather than being solely at home and uninvolved in anything around them. 

However, I do acknowledge that my own view is non-mainstream (that is, it is more of what is considered today a reformist view) and that the mainstream view is that this is because Islam, as a perfect system, provides an ideal model of marriage, and if people follow it they will have harmony. And that this authority given to the man provides order and structure for society and prevents moral corruption and so on. 
 

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 1 year ago

It is not forbidden, although, customarily, some people might consider it better to wait.

Hadith focus on mourning on the day of Ashura and refraining from worldly affairs on Ashura, or for the first 10 days of Muharram, rather than the entire month of Muharram. I would personally advise against buying a house on the actual day of Ashura, although again it is not forbidden. 

Anyway, you have to live somewhere, and if you need somewhere to live now, or if your best option to buy the house now, you have to make the choice that is best for you. You are better able to serve Imam Husain if you are not homeless!

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

It is allowed to have such pictures on clothes, carpets, curtains, walls etc but it is Makrouh (disliked) to pray (Salah) in front of such pictures.

Wassalam.