Evil

Evil, in a general sense, is the opposite or absence of good. It can be an extremely broad concept, though in everyday usage is often used more narrowly to denote profound wickedness. It is generally seen as taking multiple possible forms, such as the form of personal moral evil commonly associated with the word, or impersonal natural evil (as in the case of natural disasters or illnesses), and in religious thought, the form of the demonic or supernatural/eternal.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

Bad thoughts can come to lot of people as part of our struggle with our worst enemy Shaytan. Your feeling annoyed from such thoughts means you are not with it and your heart and mind is with Allah not with the bad thoughts.

Tackling bad thoughts needs : Firstly: Knowing that these thoughts are instigated by Shaytan. When we know the evil source, we remain more alert.

Secondly: Seeking help from Allah (SWT) to tackle these evil thoughts. He always helps His servants who seek His help. Keep on praying and supplicating to Him even by repeating saying Ya Allah, Ya Allah, Ya Rahman, Ya Raheem etc. It is very useful to repeat ALLAHUMMA SALLI 'ALA MUHAMMAD WA AALI MUHAMMAD.

It is also very helpful to repeat Estighfaar and recitibg Sura Tawheed.

It is also very helpful to recite Sura Qaaf with voice that your can hear.

Seeking the Waseelah of Ahlul Bayt (AS) is very helpful especially Imam Al-Mahdi (AS).

Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 8 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Key to the problem of evil is the definition of evil. If there is any greater purpose, compensation or wisdom behind suffering it cannot be defined as unnecessary evil. For example, making your kids do their homework is not evil, as while your kids may think they are unnecessarily suffering, that suffering has a purpose. It also has compensation in that learning is good for the children and it is wise on behalf of the parents to put their children through the suffering of studying. So too other issues of evil can be framed such that they are not evil. For example, the trials and tribulations of the prophets (as) were for a purpose, were part of Divine Wisdom and will be rewarded in the next life. One of the main wisdom behind human evil, is that there is no meaningful free will if humans are prevented from carrying out that free will even if it results in evil.

May you always be successful 

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Zeinab Donati, Zeinab Donati has been studying books about various Islamic subjects for more than 19 years. She is deeply interested in history and politics as well as social issues in particular those pertaining... Answered 10 months ago

In addition to what have been nicely replied, I would like to share a list of texts that discuss about evil in relation with Divine Justice, hoping that they will be interesting read that will bring a lot of reflections and a deeper understanding on this subject inshaAllah.
Divine Justice and the Problem of Evil, by Ghulam Husayn Adeel
https://www.al-islam.org/message-thaqalayn/vol11-n2-2010/divine-justice-...
Divine Justice or The Problem of Evil, by Javad Shayvard
https://www.al-islam.org/divine-justice-or-problem-evil-javad-shayvard
Discursive Theology Volume 1, Lesson 25: Evil and the Justice of God
https://www.al-islam.org/discursive-theology-volume-1-dr-ali-rabbani-gul...
Evils, An Excerpt from Ayatullah Murtadha Mutahhari's Divine Justice
https://www.al-islam.org/articles/evils-excerpt-ayatullah-murtadha-mutah...
Ultimate Questions in Philosophy of Religion, by Shaykh Mansour Leghaei, chapter 17 & 18
https://www.al-islam.org/ultimate-questions-philosophy-religion-shaykh-m...
https://www.al-islam.org/ultimate-questions-philosophy-religion-shaykh-m...

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 10 months ago

Allah, The Glorious, created human beings  and granted them the ability to be good if they want, or to be bad if they insist on doing bad. In Quran ( We Have guided the human being to the right path, to chose whether to be grateful or disgraceful) Sura Al-Insan, Verse 3.

Allah (SWT) gives all human beings the option to choose their faith and deeds, after guiding them to the Truth. They will meet the results of their option in this life and hereafter.
No doubt that Allah knows who will be grateful and who will be disgraceful, but His knowledge does not make Him cancel the existence of those who will be bad, or stop their creation,  because it will be against justice to punish the sinners to be before committing the sin.

Evil people prove the qualities of good people and with out bad people, it will be difficult to identify the good persons.

Wassalam.
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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 10 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. The problem of evil is an issue that has been discussed extensively in philosophy of religion but unfortunately the issue is primarily framed in a way that emphasises certain Attributes of God based on the Christian tradition. There is also much confusion on the relation of God and time as well as on what knowledge actually is in relation to God.
 

In summary evil people are such through their own choice and it would be unjust for God to sentence them to eternal punishment without them actually choosing evil.

May you always be successful 

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 11 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Humans are created with a predisposition for good as well as evil. Their good is in their natural disposition (fitrah) and their evil stems from their commanding self (al-nafs al-ammarah). It is only through the disposition towards evil that the choice to follow what is right has value. Through the purification of the self, humans unveil the truth and through struggle they understand its value and nuances. So it is the Wisdom of God that dictates that humans should be endowed with the potential for good and evil and the choice to choose which path to take.

May you always be successful.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answer updated 1 year ago

According to the Qur'an and hadith, Shaytan is an immaterial entity who affects people through influencing their hearts and minds.

(By "immaterial", I mean that he is not composed of the same physical material as objects around us. The Qur'an and hadith say that humans are composed of earth, jinn of fire, and angels of light. The prevalent understanding from the Qur'an is that Shaytan is a jinn, although there is a minority view that he was created as an angel. So he is made of something, he is just not made of the same physical substances that we interact with.)

Qur'an 6:122 speaks of shayateen (those who serve the interests of Shaytan) who are humans and jinn. This indicates that human beings themselves can carry out the will of Shaytan without him actually being present in physical form. It also indicates that, when it comes to Shaytan and shayateen, there is a real division between human and non-human beings and it is not metaphorical.

In any case, from that, it is clear that Shaytan does not need to be here in human form to do the job. A commander who can send a footsoldier does not need to show up himself.

In fact, human beings do not even need Shaytan to cause evil! We have the capacity for immense good and immense evil on our own. 

There are some rare cases in the Qur'an where immaterial entities briefly appear as humans, such as when the angel Gabriel appears to the Virgin Mary, but it is not the norm.

Also, Allah protects the believers from Shaytan. 

So while there are some humans that I might identify as Shaytan (no names here!), the Qur'an lends itself to a more literal interpretation of Shaytan as a wholly non-human being rather than as a someone who is a human or walks around in human form. 

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Vinay Khetia, Shaikh Vinay Khetia has studied at various traditional Islamic seminaries in London, Iraq and Syria. He has an undergraduate degree in Religious and Near Eastern Studies from the University of... Answer imported 1 year ago

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Sayyid Fadhel Milani, Ayatollah Sayyid Fadhel Al-Milani was born in Karbala, Iraq, in 1944. He read Religious Studies at the hawza of Najaf, from 1962 to 1970, under late Grand Ayatollah Sayyid Abul Qasim Al-Khoei and... Answer imported 1 year ago