Arabic

Arabic (العَرَبِيَّة‎, al-ʻarabiyyah, or عَرَبِيّ‎) or is a Semitic language that first emerged in the 1st to 4th centuries CE. It is now the lingua franca of the Arab world. It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living in the area bounded by Mesopotamia in the east and the Anti-Lebanon mountains in the west, in Northwestern Arabia and in the Sinai Peninsula.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

Ahlul Bayt Library. 
www.ablibrary.net

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 5 months ago

Fasting during the whole month of Ramadan is obligatory on every Muslim even if they don't know how to perform Prayers properly. You must fast and pray as much as you know and must learn as much as you can.

You should take help from those Muslims who know how to pray or pray with congregation.

'Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 7 months ago

It is ok to recite that way. After all, there have been many Muslims who can't read at all and still recite from memory.

Still there is a certain blessing that the actual Arabic script of the Qur'an is said to hold and it is narrated that looking at the Qur'an is a type of worship; my understanding is that this involves the actual Arabic letters. So it is good to learn to read the Arabic script if you can. There are a lot of self-study materials available today.

But if you can't, that is also ok too. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 10 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As far as there being an English speaking curriculum, or madarasa is concerned, in Najaf al-Ashraf, I do not think there is such an establishment. 

However, I also do not recommend that if you were interested in joining the Hawzah, that you study only in English. It is imperative that a Hawzah student not only learns Arabic, but also masters it. Ultimately, you are going to be working not just with Arabic Hawzah texts, but also the Quran and hadith, and with deeper insight and stronger comprehension. 

You will be able to pick up on the language quickly, and learn it like how all other non-Arabs have learnt it. 

As for information, I have a FB page where I have put together some sources and material for Hawzah studies. Hopefully it will be of benefit:

https://www.facebook.com/Hawzah-Studies-Resource-Page-1424569624476422/

With prayers for your success. 

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Mateen Charbonneau, Sheikh Mateen Joshua Charbonneau achieved a certificate from Harvard University in Islamic Studies. He undertook Howza classes under esteemed scholars since 2013 and has been teaching at Imam Mahdi... Answered 10 months ago

There is also reward in reading the translation. 

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 1 year ago

It is ok to give the baby a Japanese name.

Congratulations and best wishes with the birth!

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Understanding the meaning of Du'a is better than reading with out understanding.

Sawab depends on the intention and degree of the sincerity and dedication, not merely on the language.

Wassalam.

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The prayers (Salah) must be recited in Arabic as the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) recited and ordered all Muslims: Pray as you saw me praying صلوا كما رأيتموني أصلي

If you mean by prayers the supplications (Du'a), it is allowed to recite Du'a in your preferable language. Even you are allowed to read within the Salah supplications in your own language, but that supplications should be along with Arabic parts of Salah.

In short, Salah must be in Arabic but Du'a can be in your referable language.

Wassalam.

Wassalam.

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 1 year ago

as salam alaikum

a translation of the Qur'an is not the Qur'an therefore it is necessary to recite it in the Arabic language during the salat. Other intentional extra-words would invalidate the prayer. It is advisable to try as much as possible to take familiarity with the Qur'an in order to always feel in harmony with it.

With prayers for your success.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 1 year ago

It is good to understand what you say in prayers, and that can be easily achieved  by translating the prayers sentences to your language. Nevertheless, prayers are obligatory on every Muslim whether he or she understands Arabic or not.

Wassalam.

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https://youtu.be/lgN4JlGwsUM?t=54

Some people pronounce it differently due to their accent or what they heard growing up. For instance, in Persian, one says "Ramazan" when talking and not "Ramadan" because it is how it is said in the language, just as in English people often say "Izlaam" not "Islaam". For things not involving Qur'an, it doesn't really matter.

However, when reciting Qur'an, it is good to try to pronounce the letters as correctly as possible. If a person is genuinely unable to pronounce a letter correctly, it is ok, but they should try. 

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Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 1 year ago

as salam alaikum

learning Arabic language to truly understand your faith is praiseworthy and highly recommended. You can check the available courses in your area or even online in this regard. However to better reach your aim you should try to give preference to "Classical Arabic" or "Qur'anic Arabic" courses rather than "Modern Standard Arabic".

With prayers for your success.