Maghrib

The Maghrib prayer (Arabic: صلاة المغرب‎ ṣalāt al-maġrib, '"sunset prayer"), prayed just after sunset, is the fourth of five obligatory daily prayers (salat) performed by practicing Muslims.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 2 weeks ago

In the Sunni hadith books, especiallly Bukhari and Muslim, it is mentioned that children should not go out at/after maghrib for fear of shayateen. Among some Sunnis, it is customary to discourage women or children in particular from going out then or at night. 

Perhaps this developed in part also due to a practical safety concern (that generally it is less safe outside at night, and in many places, women and children are cautious about going out alone at night). Also in those days they had less lighting. 

This idea is not commonly found in the Shi'i tradition, and Shi'is generally do not accept the contents of Bukhari and Muslim as authentic without further investigation. I am not saying that this narration doesn't possibly exist anywhere in Shi'i books, since there are thousands and thousands of Shi'i narrations, but it isn't generally given consideration a religious basis. (Of course, culturally, some Shi'is may discourage some people from going outside for social or safety reasons, but that is different.)

Anyway, the Prophet and Imams went outside at night when it was appropriate to do so. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

The time of  breaking the fast is immediately on Maghrib time which is the start of the night according to Quran. (Then complete fasting till night) 2:187

It is recommended to pray Maghrib Prayer then break the fast.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 3 months ago

Yes, it is recommended to pray Maghrib Prayer before breaking fast (Iftar) as Prayers is more important than breaking the fast, but it is not obligatory to do so. It is just recommended if there is no one waiting for you for Iftar and you do not feel weak if you pray before Iftar.

Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 5 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Below is the ruling of Ayatullah Sistani (hA):

Ruling 978. Based on obligatory precaution, it is obligatory for a man to recite Surat al-Ḥamd and the other surah aloud (jahr) in ṣubḥ, maghrib, and ʿishāʾ prayers. And based on obligatory precaution, it is obligatory for a man and a woman to recite Surat al-Ḥamd and the other surah in ẓuhr, and ʿaṣr in a whisper (ikhfāt).

May you always be successful 

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 5 months ago

Man is obliged to recite Sura Al-Hamd and other Sura in the first and second Rak'ats in Fajr, Maghrib and Isha Prayers with clear voice not whispering. It is not rising the voice like shouting but just reciting with clear voice. This rule is obligatory on males only not on females.

Wassalam.

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 7 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The end of the time for Maghrib and 'Isha is the middle of the night in the case of the delay being voluntary. 

Middle of the night here means the middle between ghurub of the sun and Fajr time. This means it would depend on location and time of the year. 

If the delay is not voluntary, and one has an excuse, like ending menstrual cycle after the middle of the night, or sleeping, or unconscious, then the time would extend until before Fajr. 

Please refer to your Marja' taqleed for details.

And Allah knows best. 

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Zeinab Donati, Zeinab Donati has been studying books about various Islamic subjects for more than 19 years. She is deeply interested in history and politics as well as social issues in particular those pertaining... Answered 8 months ago

I think that it could be useful for you to read the book  "Prayer (Salat), According to the Five Islamic Schools of Law", in particular the section concerning Maghrib since it analyzes the various opinions in details: https://www.al-islam.org/shiite-encyclopedia/prayer-salat-according-five-islamic-schools-law-part-1#time-maghrib-and-%E2%80%98isha%E2%80%99-prayers

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answered 8 months ago

as salam alaikum

the time of Maghrib prayer starts at sunset. There is a disagreement among Shia scholars on when sunset starts. There are three major opinions in this regard:

1) Maghrib time start when the redness of the eastern sky disappears which is usually about 10-15 minutes after Sunni Maghrib time.

2) Maghrib time start at the disappearance of the sun in the western sky which is the same as Sunni Maghrib time.

3) Maghrib time starts at the disappearance of the sun in the western sky but as precaution we should wait until the redness in the eastern sky is disappeared.

The ahadith in support of the second opinion are accepted by all Islamic schools and are stronger in term of authenticity and numbers of isnads. However we find also ahadith stating the beginning of Maghrib time at the time of the disappearance of the redness in the eastern sky and that is why many scholars gave preference to that, at least as precautionary measure.

With prayers for your success.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 9 months ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. According to the school of Ahl al-Bayt (as) there is no problem with combining the zuhr and asr prayers in that sequence (one prayer immediately after the other or with any time gap between) after the time of zuhr has set in without any specific reason. Similarly there is no problem with combining magrib and isha prayers after the time of magrib. So there is no problem praying isha prayer after magrib prayer and before 7pm.

May you always be successful.

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Seyed Ali Musawi, Seyed Ali Musawi studied religion and history at the University of California, San Diego and subsequently he studied for more than 8 years at the Islamic Seminary in Qum, Iran, focusing on Islamic... Answered 11 months ago

Salaam Allaikum,

There may be some slight differences between the marajah, so it is important to check this with your specific Marja, but in general, the time of maghrib begins when the redness in the Eastern sky has dissipated.

Oftentimes, people think maghrib is when the redness of the western sky (where the sun sets) has dissipated but this is actually not the case and Maghrib occurs a bit earlier than this....

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I would like to add that it is indeed recommended to perform one's prayer before breaking their fast, unless there is someone else waiting for them to break their fast, in which case it would be recommended to break fast with them, and then pray.

And Allah knows best.

Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb, Sayyed Muhammad Husaini Ragheb has a BA in Law from Guilan University, Iran and has also undertaken Hawzah studies in Qom. He is a Cultural Affairs director of Ethics Group of Al-Mustafa Open... Answered 1 year ago

Yes it is Mustahab(recommended) unless one is very weak, then it's better to do Iftar and pray afterwards