Isha

99841

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 4 months ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As you know, for us Muslims, prayer takes priority over absolutely everything. We plan our lives and our daily routine around prayer. We select our form of lifestyle and work based on how we can excel in our faith and get closer to God. 

Prayer, which is the most effective way to do this, must of course be done in its perfect form, and within its allocated time. 

Anything that becomes an obstacle for that, we must eliminate, even if it means loss of money or changing of work opportunity. 

In any job description, you are able to see if you can meet their requirements and also your religious requirements. If they do not give you any breaks, even toilet breaks, then in today's world that would be illegal and inhumane. 

I am sure you are able to find a few minutes, during your break, to perform your prayers, quickly, and get back to work. 

If under no circumstance are you able to take a break, or pray within the shar'i timeframe of the salat, then have trust in Allah ta'ala, who is the Razzaq, and pursue other work opportunities that would suit your Islamic values and human rights as well. 

With prayers for your success. 

73606

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

If you are sure that you prayed five Rak'ats, then you must repeat the Prayer, but if you have doubt, after you have completed the prayer, then this doubt has no value and your prayer is valid.

Wassalam.

67719

Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 1 year ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Below is the ruling of Ayatullah Sistani (hA):

Ruling 978. Based on obligatory precaution, it is obligatory for a man to recite Surat al-Ḥamd and the other surah aloud (jahr) in ṣubḥ, maghrib, and ʿishāʾ prayers. And based on obligatory precaution, it is obligatory for a man and a woman to recite Surat al-Ḥamd and the other surah in ẓuhr, and ʿaṣr in a whisper (ikhfāt).

May you always be successful 

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Man is obliged to recite Sura Al-Hamd and other Sura in the first and second Rak'ats in Fajr, Maghrib and Isha Prayers with clear voice not whispering. It is not rising the voice like shouting but just reciting with clear voice. This rule is obligatory on males only not on females.

Wassalam.

62753

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The end of the time for Maghrib and 'Isha is the middle of the night in the case of the delay being voluntary. 

Middle of the night here means the middle between ghurub of the sun and Fajr time. This means it would depend on location and time of the year. 

If the delay is not voluntary, and one has an excuse, like ending menstrual cycle after the middle of the night, or sleeping, or unconscious, then the time would extend until before Fajr. 

Please refer to your Marja' taqleed for details.

And Allah knows best. 

60376

Abbas Di Palma, Shaykh Abbas Di Palma holds a BA and an MA degree in Islamic Studies, and certifications from the Language Institute of Damascus University. He has also studied traditional Islamic sciences in... Answer updated 1 year ago

as salam alaikum

the sunset (Maghrib time) marks the beginning of the new twenty-four-hour period (Yawm) or "day". For example, at Maghrib of Thursday starts the night of Friday (Laylat al-Jumu'ah) and at Fajr time of the night of Friday starts the daytime of Friday (Nahar al-Jumu'ah) and it lasts until the next Maghrib. The same goes for all the others days.

With prayers for your success.

60150

Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 1 year ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. According to the school of Ahl al-Bayt (as) there is no problem with combining the zuhr and asr prayers in that sequence (one prayer immediately after the other or with any time gap between) after the time of zuhr has set in without any specific reason. Similarly there is no problem with combining magrib and isha prayers after the time of magrib. So there is no problem praying isha prayer after magrib prayer and before 7pm.

May you always be successful.

57577

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Nafilah of Ishaa is either two Raka'ats in sitting position or one Raka'at
in standing position, though the 2 Raka'ats in sitting position is
better.

In the 2 Raka'ats of sitting position, you perform the Ruku' by bending
forward in the sitting position and recite ‘Subhana Rabbay al Adheem
wa Bihamdih , then sitting straight again and then going for Sujood
twice, then sitting again for the 2nd Rakaat like the 1st Rakaat.

If you opt to perform it in the standing position, it is just one
Rakaat with Surah al Fateha and 1 other Surah, then Qunoot, then
Rukoo, then the 2 Sajdah.

Wassalaam.