Surat al-Fatihah

Al-Fātiḥah (Arabic: الْفَاتِحَة‎, "The Opening" or "The Opener") is the first chapter (sūrah) of the Quran. Its seven verses (āyāt) are a prayer for the guidance, lordship, and mercy of God. This chapter has an essential role in Islamic prayer (salāt).

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

The meanings of the Quranic verses can not be taken just from the superficial linguistic meanings. Allah (SWT) Has clearly mentioned in Quran that it is the responsibility of the Prophet (SAWA) to explain to the people the real meanings of Quran (Sura 16, Verse 44).

The meaning of Sura Al-Hamd verses which you quoted never suggest not to seek Waseela. Prophets were mentioned in Quran seeking help from people like Prophet Musa (AS) who asked people for food, and Prophet Sulaiman (AS) who asked people to help him in getting the throne of Bilqees.

We believe that no one can help with out the permission of Allah (SWT).

We do Tawassul because we are been ordered by Allah (SWT) to seek Waseela ( Sura 4, Verse 64.

Wassalam 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 month ago

Saying Ameen after Sura Al-Hamd is a Bid'ah came from non Muslims. Authentic Hadeeth from Muhammad al-Halabi: I asked Aba Abdillah (Imam Jafaria Al-Sadiq) (AS):  Can I say Ameen after Sura Al-Hamd?  Imam Al-Sadiq replied: No. (Al-Wasaa'il, 4:450).

Shaikh al-Sadouq stated in his book Al-Faqeeh 1:390 that: It is not allowed to say Ameen after reciting Al-Fatiha, because it is said by the Christians ( Nazareths). 
Shaheed al-Awwal said in his book al-Thikra 3:345 : Saying Ameen after Sura Al-Fatiha is not permissible and it invalidates the Salah. It is Bid'ah.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 7 months ago

Yes, it is not only permissible but highly recommended to recite Sura Fatiha or any Quranic verse or verses and gift the reward to a deceased. Many authentic Hadeeths stated that. It helps the deceased very much.

'Wassalam.

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This claim seems to be coming from a person who has no basic knowledge about Quran, or a person who has not read the whole Quranic verses.
1. Quran has many verses of prayers to Allah in which Allah is teaching us how to supplicate and what are the best words of supplications. These verses which are found in many Suras including Sura Al-Fatiha never mean that Allah is addressing Himself, but He is teaching us the best way and wordings of supplications. Books were compiled on the Quranic verses of supplications.

2. Quranic Suras starting with 'Say' are just five out of 114 Sura ( Al-Jinn, Al-Kafiroon, Al-Tawheed, Al-Falaq and Annaas). There is no question and no reason at all to claim that al-Fatiha should start with 'Say' 

3. There are five Suras in Quran starting with the supplication word; Alhamdulillah الحمد لله ( Al-Fatiha, Al-An'aam, Al-Kahf, Saba', and Faatir). Non of theses Suras started with 'Say' 

4. Sura Al-Fatiha or Al-Hamd is the greatest Sura in Quran according authentic Hadeeth. It is called also Ummul Kitaab 'the mother of the book' and no Salah can be prayed with out reciting it " There is no Prayer with out Fatiha لا صلاة إلا بفاتحة الكتاب 

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

You do not need to recite the whole verse again. Just be sure that you recited every word in the verse properly.

Wassalam.

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https://youtu.be/lgN4JlGwsUM?t=54

Some people pronounce it differently due to their accent or what they heard growing up. For instance, in Persian, one says "Ramazan" when talking and not "Ramadan" because it is how it is said in the language, just as in English people often say "Izlaam" not "Islaam". For things not involving Qur'an, it doesn't really matter.

However, when reciting Qur'an, it is good to try to pronounce the letters as correctly as possible. If a person is genuinely unable to pronounce a letter correctly, it is ok, but they should try. 

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

No, it is not permissible to add on Salah any thing which was not recited or done by the Prophet (SAWA).

Third and forth Rak'ats have either three times of Tasbeehaat (SUBHANALLAH WALHAMDULILLAH WALA ELAAHA ILLALLAH WALLAHU AKBAR) 3 times, or one time Sura Al-Hamd only.

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 2 years ago

Yes, Surah al-Hamd is another name for Surah al-Fatihah, i.e. the first surah of the Qur'an, and it is recited between 2-4 times in each of the 5 daily prayers. 

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 years ago

Bismihi ta'ala 

It is very clear that no Muslim says any expression like 'Ya Rasul Allah Madad', or 'Ya Ali Madad', with the slightest of intention that they are equal to Almighty God, or that they will help independently free of any involvement from God.  

If, for argument sake, someone was to say anything like this, and believe that a Prophet, an Imam or a saint can within their own power independent from God they are performing Shirk, and this is forbidden and condemned. 

But, if we were to seek intercession, or help, or call to any of God's creation, alive or dead, who have an exceptional status in the eyes of Almighty God and they be granted this position from God, then it is not Shirk, not is it a contradiction. 

We seek forgiveness from Almighty God, but also in the Quran the Almighty says that the Prophet (s.a.w) can forgive us as well (Surah al-Nisa`, verse 64). We can also make reference to the story of Prophet Ya'qub (a.s.) and his children (Surah Yusef, 97-98). 

As for asking which one is better? Tp say Ya Allah, or Ya Ali. This kind of question is meaningless, because it entails that they are equally parallel to each other, or one replaces the other. However, it is not the case. Each expression functions within its own usage. It is like saying 'should I say Ya Rahman, or Ya Rahim'. 

Furthermore, there are many authentic traditions in both Sunni and Shia sources that validate the practice of Istighathah and Tawassul. Some Sunni scholars, like Imam al-Sabki, say it is a very good practice. In Sunni sources it also has a frequently mentioned tradition that 'remembering Ali is in itself an act of worship'. 

Therefore, there is no contradition, and Muslims throughout the history of Islam have sought help from mediums other than Allah ta'ala, without any intent of Shirk. The Almighty has appointed Prophets and Imams as mediums, and therefore we are able to get to Him through them.

Wassalam

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 years ago

Bismihi ta'ala

According to the main view the word 'Ameen' آمين is used to mean 'O God, answer'. So, in this case there is nothing wrong with the expression itself, even though this word does not come from the Quran, nor is it a part of any verse. 

This is something agreed upon by both Sunnis and Shi'ah. 

However, the issue is whether it is permissible to say it in a daily obligatory prayer, after reciting the Fatihah. 

Shi'a scholars say that if Ameen is said with the intention of it being a part of Salat, then the prayer will be invalid. It is a foreign word and has nothing related to the Surah, or correct dhikrs mentioned as parts of the Salat.

We are obliged to adhere to how the Prophet (s.a.w.) has taught us to pray. In the narrations there is no mentioning that the word 'Ameen' should be said after the Fatihah.

We cannot add something that does not exist in the Sunnah of the Prophet (s.a.w.), and therefore doing such a thing would nullify our Salat.  

It is a consensus of Shi'ah scholars that saying 'Ameen' in Salat, after Fatihah is an innovation and therefore would invalidate the prayer. 

Ameen is a word foreign to the prayer, and not a 'supplication'. This is contrary to the expression 'alhamdulillah rabb al-'alameen' which would be permissible to say after reciting the Fatihah, due to it being a dua and also it being mentioned to do so in authentic traditions. 

For further information on the word Ameen, see:

http://en.wikishia.net/view/Amin

And Allah knows best.