Azadari

The Mourning of Muharram (also known as the Remembrance of Muharram or Muharram Observances) is a set of rituals associated with mainly Shia Muslims; however, some Muslims from other sects, as well as some non-Muslims, also take part in the remembrance. The commemoration falls in Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar. Many of the events associated with the ritual take place in congregation halls known as Hussainia.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 7 months ago

The Hadeeth says: Eyes will not be dry but because of hard hearts, and hearts will not be hard but because of sinful acts.

We always need to seek forgiveness and remember and repent our sins and beg for forgiveness.

It is mentioned in the Hadeeths to put you hand on the head of an orphan so that your heart will be more soft and sympathetic.

It is also very good to visit the grave yard especially the graves of your parents or relatives or friends. Seeking your needs in a Du'a near your parents is very useful.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 7 months ago

Yes. We have authentic Hadeeths that weeping for tragedies of Ahlul Bayt (AS). Imam Muhammad Al-Baqir (AS) said: Any believer who weeps on our sufferings from our enemies till his tears flow on his cheek, Allah will grant him a place in Paradise. Kaamil al-Ziyarat by Ibn Qawlawayh , page 100.

Wassalam.

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 1 year ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. As people of faith, we connect to our sacred history and the personalities that represent the values of our religion. Thus, while events may have happened a long time ago, the personalities that these events happened to are important to us, so naturally, when recounting the tragedies that befell them, we cannot help but be brought to tears. Such acts of devotion have a positive effect on the soul and this has been indicated in the copious praise for crying over these events in our scriptural sources. Simply put, we cry because it matters to us and we recount the events so that we remember and develop those feelings and are revitalized by the strengthening of our bond with those we love.

May you always be successful

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Human beings have their own ways to express their feelings of grief and sadness as well to express their feelings of happiness. Islam allows different ways of expression of feelings as far as it does not contradict a clear ruling of Islam. No one can express his happiness by dancing, simply because dancing is forbidden in Islam. No one can express his sadness by drinking beer or alcohol, simply because drinking alcohol or beer is forbidden in Islam.

People whom you mentioned in your question are expressing their feelings of grief by their own way which does not contradict with any Islamic clear rule, and does not have bad effect on the image of Islam.

Allah (SWT) grants people the reward according to their intentions. These people are observing and remembering the tragedy of Karbala. May Allah (SWT) grant them reward according to their intentions.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

You must be sure that you and your children will always follow Ahlul Bayt (AS). Don't take any risk in this crucial matter. I advise you to invite him to read few books written by Sunni scholars who became followers of Ahlul Bayt (AS) after researching Sunni and Shia books e.g The I was guided by Dr Samawi Tijani and The Miising Link etc.

After reading such books and being able to ask questions to Shia scholars, he should be able to decide his following Ahlul Bayt (AS).

Wassakam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

She is allowed to do so for serving the noble aims of Ahlul Bayt (AS). Men will be allowed to listen as far as her voice does not cause unwanted effect on non Mahram men, otherwise they should avoid listening.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

Beating our chest is a sign of mourning and sadness on the tragedies of Ahlul Bayt(AS). It was practiced by early Muslims including Ayisha on her father's death (al-Tabaqaat al-Kubba by Ibn Sa'd, V.2, P.201),  and pious believers on the tragedies of Ahlul Bayt (AS). 

It is not self violence  but expressing our feelings which helps us as well as confirm our love and attachment with the Prophet (SAWA) and his Progeny Ahlul Bayt (AS).

Wassalam.

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Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 2 years ago

The short answer is, azadari is optional not required, so if you don't want to do it or don't want to be in a place where people are doing it, this is not *religiously* necessary (although, socially, in some places, this may be a challenge).

The longer answer is, bad thoughts and misgivings come from somewhere. Sometimes they arise for good reasons, such as seeing people do wrong or hypocritical things.

Sometimes they arise for bad reasons, such as listening to false ideas (such as some of the baseless criticisms of Shiism in some websites) or self-hatred/embarrassment about one's culture.

So, it doesn't hurt to look into what you are thinking and explore why you are thinking it, and whether it is something that is leading you towards truth and a more enlightened way of being, or not. 

Whether or not you choose to make azadari part of your life, it is good to be tolerant towards other people's practices (insofar as they are permissible) and to acknowledge and respect them even if you choose not to do them.

Otherwise if we become intolerant towards how other people live their religion simply because we disagree with them, we will not be any different from those people who go around attacking Shiis for being kuffar because Shiis pray on turbahs and that sort of thing. 

Also, regarding azadari, sometimes people become less enthusiastic about azadari as they get older. I guess this is because younger people have more energy and spirit and also things are newer to us when we are younger, then at some point we max out on what we are getting out of azadari, and wish to explore other things. This is of course not true for everyone (I can already imagine the emails of objection flooding my inbox!) but it is true for some people and for most things in life; that is, sometimes things work for us during some life phases and not others.

Religiously speaking, there are also plenty of other things you can focus on that are also meritorious, for instance, if, currently in your life, you feel like you get more out of focusing on reciting the Qur'an or doing charitable work or something else that has value. Of course it is still also meritorious to remember and express sadness for Ahl al-Bayt (A)!

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Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 3 years ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. In the same way that we mourn departed loved ones out of the love and mercy for them that exists in our hearts, even if they may have been martyred, so too the lovers of Ahl al-Bayt (as) mourn the terrible tragedy that befell them (as).

That certainly does not take away from their reward, rather through God’s Mercy, their tribulation and the softness of our hearts towards them, and the mourning that is a natural consequence, has been validated and made into a worship by God. Crying for the tragedy of Imam Husayn (as) is praiseworthy and has been associated with great rewards in our scriptural literature. It is from here that the tradition of mourning finds its roots.

May you always be successful