Orphan

An orphan is someone whose parents have died, are unknown, or have permanently abandoned them. In common usage, only a child who has lost both parents due to death is called an orphan.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

1. We abide to the meanings of Quranic verses and rules of Islam as explained by the Prophet Muhammad (SAWA) and his Holy Progeny Ahlul Bayt (AS), and not our own thinking or our superficial linguistic understanding which is away from what the Prophet and Ahlul Bayt have explained.

2. Khums consist of two equal parts; Sahm Imam, and Sahm Sadat. Sahm Sadat is the right of needy Sadat who ae from the family tree of the Prophet (SAWA). Allah (ST) knows that Ahlul Bayt (AS) and their families will face big difficulties from their enemies, that is why, Sahm Sadat has been ordained for the needy Sadat.

3. Sahm Imam (AS) is the right of the Imam (AS) and it is received either by him or by his deputies like the Marja' of Taqleed or his deputies now a days. Sahm Imam is used generally in serving the general poor and needy and religious, educational and social services.

Wassalam

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Having such feelings after this incident probably happening a long time ago is a positive sign of your righteousness. Seeing that you have repented, the only thing remaining is that you pay that specific amount back. 

Should you wish to sponsor orphan/s, then that would also be an honourable thing for you, or any beleiver to do.

Wassalam

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Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 year ago

Bismihi ta'ala

If your question is regarding who the Wali 'Amr is, and a wali amr in this case refers to the Islamic guardian, who is the father, or the father's father, then there are few scenarios:

If the girl is a virgin, and not religiously independent (rasheedah) her wali amr can be a male who her father has appointed in his will. If the father has not appointed anyone in the will, then her wali amr is a Jurist who carries all the required conditions of Ijtihad. The Mujtahid that she selects will be her authority and her guardian. This means that the Mujtahid can approve the marriage, and hence it will be legitimate. 

If she is rasheedah, and rasheedah in this Islamic context means a woman who has not been married, but is individually, socially and financially independent and she alone makes her own choices and decisions. In this case, she does not need consent from anyone.

In any of these above cases, it is crucial that family members be involved as well. For example, even though from a shar'i perspective she does not need to seek consent from her mother, or her uncles, or elders, but it is indeed morally and socially very important to do. 

And Allah knows best.