Narrations

81756

Zoheir Ali Esmail, Shaykh Zoheir Ali Esmail has a Bsc in Accounting and Finance from the LSE in London, and an MA in Islamic Studies from Middlesex University. He studied Arabic at Damascus University and holds a PhD... Answered 1 week ago

Bismillah

Thank you for your question. Different authors had different purposes and differing criteria when compiling their books. Sometimes, it is not the author's criteria, but the version of the book that has reached us that may be problematic, as Shii hadith history is a history of textual transmission.

Bihar al-anwar is a book that was written in the 17th Century which tried to preserve as much of the Shii tradition as possible. The author was therefore not concerned with sifting reports and left that to later hadith scholars, as hadith scholars also use different criteria when analyzing the reports in various books.

Usul al-Kafi on the other hand was an attempt to produce a book of reliable reports, but at the same time, not everybody agrees with what the author of al-Kafi (al-Kulayni) considered reliable. In short, hadith scholarship is a complex field where there are many aspects to weigh up and that is why it takes expertise. The natural outcome of that is that not everyone will agree with a specific scholar's assessment if they are trying to produce a reliable work. 

May you always be successful

81598

Amina Inloes, Amina Inloes is originally from the US and has a PhD in Islamic Studies from the University of Exeter on Shi'a hadith. She is the program leader for the MA Islamic Studies program at the... Answered 2 weeks ago

Further clarification:

There are many different hadith that are considered hadith qudsi (that is, telling us directly what God says, but not as part of the Qur'anic revelation). 

Some of these hadith are shared between Sunnis and Shi'is, and some are specifically Sunni, and some are specifically Shi'i.

As mentioned in the previous answer, each one can be evaluated individually with respect to its authenticity.

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 2 weeks ago

Hadeeth Qudsi is narrated in Sunni and Shia books. Our Ulama study the content and the chain of narrators before giving their opinion about the authenticity of it.

We have books on Hadeeth Qudsi compiled by Shia Ulama as well as Sunni Ulama.

Wassalam.

75290

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

You are not allowed in jurisprudence to follow narrations, but the verdicts of the Marji' of Taqleed. Narrations can be authentic or not authentic. The Marji' of Taqleed assesses that. Even if the narration is authentic, you can not take its meanings superficially or through the translators, but you must follow the Marji' of Taqleed.

Some books contain narrations from different sources and you can not decide its authenticity before referring to the Marji' of Taqleed.

Wassalam.

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Rebecca Masterton, Dr Rebecca Masterton graduated with a BA in Japanese Language and Literature; an MA in Comparative East Asian and African Literature and a PhD in Islamic literature of West Africa. She has been... Answered 2 months ago

Sayid Husain Jafri, in his Origins and Development of Early Shi'a Islam, highlights some of the key narrations about Abu Bakr that are mentioned frequently in Sunni circles. Jafri points out that these particular narrations all go back to 'A'isha, who was obviously supporting her father. I can recommend that you get Jafri's book, as he does some good hadith analysis.

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 2 months ago

There are many narrations which were fabricated for political reasons. We care only for the authentic narrations which came through authentic chain of narrators from the Prophet (SAWA). You may refer to some Sunni books of 'Elm al-Hadeeth ( knowledge of Hadeeth) to see hundreds of narrations which were fabricated in praise of well known rulers.

Wassalam.

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 4 months ago

We also have in our books so many narrations teaching the man to be just, kind and nice to his wife and children.

One Hadeeth says: Best of you is the best treating his wife خيركم خيركم لأهله.

Islam guides both men and women to be good to each other to build a life of mutual respect and harmony overwhelmed with love and sympathy.

Women are required to obey their husbands when the husband does not go against Allah (SWT). Man can not behave as a dictator just because he is a man but must keep the justice when dealing with any one and sympathy when dealing with his wife and children.

Wassalam.

62481

Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answer updated 7 months ago

Bukhari has narrated in his book known as Saheeh al-Bukhari, Hadeeth number 6682, from Jaabir Ibn Samurah: I heard the Prophet (S) saying: There will be twelve leaders, all of them from Quraysh.

صحيح البخاري - الأحكام - الإستخلاف - رقم الحديث : ( 6682 )

‏- حدثني : ‏ ‏محمد بن المثنى ‏ ، حدثنا : ‏ ‏غندر ‏ ، حدثنا : ‏ ‏شعبة ‏ ‏، عن ‏ ‏عبد الملك ‏ ‏سمعت ‏ ‏جابر بن سمرة ‏ ‏قال : ‏سمعت النبي ‏ (ص) ‏ ‏يقول ‏ ‏: يكون إثنا عشر أميراً ‏، فقال : كلمة لم أسمعها ‏، ‏فقال أبي ‏: ‏إنه قال : ‏‏ كلهم من ‏قريش. ‏

Bukhari has also narrated similar Hadeeth is his other. Book known as al-Taareekh al-Kabeer.

The Hadeeth of 12 Imams after the Prophet (S) has been narrated in main Sunni  books of Hadeeth e.g. Saheeh Muslim (6 Hadeeths), Musnad Ibn Hanbal (26 Hadeths), Al-Tirmithi (One Hadeeth), Musnad Abi Dawood (2 Hadeeths), Al-Haakim AlNisaboori (3 Hadeethes), Al-Albani (4 Hadeethes), Al-Bayhaqi (5 Hadeethes), Al-Tabaraani (41 Hadeethes, Ibn Hajar Al-Asqalaani (3Hadeethes, Al-Dhahabi (2 Hadeethes) and many others.

About Imam al-Mahdi (A) Bukhari's has narrated in Hadeeth number 3193 stating  that the Prophet Easa will come down from the sky and your Imam is from you  

صحيح البخاري - نزول عيسى إبن مريم (ع) - أحاديث الأنبياء - رقم الحديث : ( 3193 )

‏- حدثنا : ‏ ‏إبن بكير ‏ ، حدثنا : ‏ ‏الليث ‏ ‏، عن ‏ ‏يونس ‏ ‏، عن ‏ ‏إبن شهاب ‏ ‏، عن ‏ ‏نافع ‏ ‏مولى ‏ ‏أبي قتادة الأنصاري ‏ ‏أن ‏ ‏أبا هريرة ‏ ‏قال : ‏قال رسول الله ‏‏(ص) ‏: ‏كيف أنتم إذا نزل ‏ ‏إبن مريم ‏ ‏فيكم وإمامكم منكم

. Thousands of Hadeeths on this subject of Imam Al-Mahdi are narrated in different Sunni books of Hadeeth. Many Sunni scholars have compiled books on this subject e.g. Al-Soyooti Jalaluddin (Al-Orf Al-Wardi Fi Akhbar Al-Mahdi)

Ibn Hajar AlMakki (Al-Mokhtasar Fi A'alamaat  Al-Mahdi Al-Muntadhar , Al-Muttaqi Al-Hindi, Al-Shawkaani, and many others.

Wassalam.

.

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Rebecca Masterton, Dr Rebecca Masterton graduated with a BA in Japanese Language and Literature; an MA in Comparative East Asian and African Literature and a PhD in Islamic literature of West Africa. She has been... Answered 1 year ago

It may be due to the region in which those scholars live and therefore which types of thought have influenced the idea of spirituality in that region. The term 'irfan' began to be used under the Safavids, to distinguish it from 'Sufism', or 'tasawwuf', which came to be associated with many spurious groups adopting various practices that had little basis in Islam. If we use the term 'Islamic mysticism', it covers a wide range of spiritual trends which have been incorporated into the field. The type of 'irfan' that may be found in Khorasan would differ from that found in Baghdad. Generally, 'irfan' as understood today, includes the thought and practice of mystics, be they Sunni or Shi'i and be their mysticism influence by Platonism or Neo-Platonism. This view of 'irfan' takes an inclusive approach to spiritual tendencies among mystics.

With regard to 'philosophy'  - this term in the Muslim world basically means Platonic-Aritotelian influenced philosophy. There are many other kinds of philosophy also - so the condemnation of philosophy does not mean philosophy per se, but this Greek-influenced trend.

Primarily, both these fields have been disapproved of in narrations attributed to the Imams (as), because both side-line or play down the central pillar of walayah. According to traditional Shi'i narrations, the Imam is the gateway to Allah (swt), the Greatest Sign and the Qutb. Ma'rifah of the Imam = Ma'rifah of God's theophany on earth. There is no greater sign than the Imam (Imam 'Ali (as) says this in Usul al-Kafi). 

The are narrations from the Imams that indicate that certain people used to sit in their circles, learn their doctrines, and then go and attribute those doctrines to themselves. This could be one root of the beginnings of Sufism. Hakim Tirmidhi, in his book Sirat al-Awliya' (The Concept of Sainthood) pretty much repackages the Imami concept of walayah, but replaces the Imam with that of the Saint, or Waliyullah (Friend of God). At the same time, he was writing polemical treatises against the Shi'a. Therefore, those who, in time of the Imams, sat in dhikr circles, or passed on the teachings of the Imams, while effectively breaking their allegiance to the Imam and attributing their teachings to themselves, were condemned. Thus, those who say that 'what it matter where these teachings come from? It all leads back to Allah' overlook the fundamental pillar of walayah and loyalty to the Imam. In effect, if you steal someone's teachings, then those teachings are transmitted on a foundation of betrayal. So there is an ethical problem here.

Some argue that the narrations attributed to the Imams that condemn irfan and philosophy are not authentic. This would require more expert investigation to ascertain their status.

With du'as

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Sayyed Mohammad Al-Musawi, Sayyed Mohammad al-Musawi is originally from Iraq and heads up the World Ahlul Bayt Islamic League in London. Other than being involved in various humanitarian projects, he frequently responds to... Answered 1 year ago

There are many Sunni scholars by this name. Ibn Al-Arabi Al-Maaliki (Abu Bakr)  ( Died 543 Hijri) is a Sunni Shaikh who wrote Al-Awaasim Minal Qawassim العواصم من لقواصم. He was the person who claimed that Imam Husain (AS) by fighting against Yazeed, went against the teachings of his grandfather the Prophet (SAWA). He was clearly away from Ahlul Bayt (AS) and follower of Bani Umayyah who were ruling Andalusia where he was living.

 Ibn Arabi (Mohyiddin) (Died 638 Hjri) , the Sufi Sunni scholar,  is a different person who wrote Al Fotoohaat Al-Makkiyyah الفتوحات المكية . His books contain right and wrong things as he was not strictly following Ahlul Bayt (AS). He wrote some statements praising Ahlul Bayt (AS) but also wrote praising some enemies of Ahlul Bayt.

We have to be very careful when we read for such persons.

Wassalam