Zaid Alsalami

Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from ANU, Canberra. He has written and translated several Islamic texts and also prepared educational videos on Islamic rulings and practices.

62304

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

In our Shi'ah fiqh, it is not obligatory nor a condition for there to be any witnesses during a marriage contract.

However, it is advisable and recommended for marriage to be conducted in the presence of others, and for the Nikah to be publicised and announced. 

And Allah knows best.  

62458

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

There are certain narrations that say whenever you place out your hands and supplicate to Almighty God, when you finish you should wipe your face and head with your hands. 

I have come across a tradition that says the reason for this is because angels receive the dua from your palms.

However, when it comes to Qunut, in your daily Wajib prayers, some Fuqaha deem it as makruh, and therefore it is best not to wife your face with your hands after Qunut, in faridhah prayers. 

There is a recommendation for you to do this in Nafilah prayers. 

Please refer to the view of your Marja' taqleed. 

And Allah knows best. 

62440

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Although it is very important to be considerate towards your wife's feelings and value her, in such a situation she should respect your request and take it the positive way. She might get upset, but if you communicate things in the right way and share your concerns, for sure she will honour your view. 

As Muslims, we do not believe in "free-mixing" between genders, and therefore we do not have such a thing as a "friend" of the opposite gender. 

Bearing in mind that you have legitimate concerns that make you feel uncomfortable with her talking to this male individual, and not that you are paranoid or being difficult. 

With prayers for your success. 

62298

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Yes, it is allowed to listen to Na'ats and Nasheeds accompanied with musical instruments, as long as it has the rest of the shar'i requirements for 'halal music'. 

With prayers for your success. 

62073

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

From what our respected 'Ulama in the Hawzah say, it is a bit difficult to specifically pinpoint who exactly is the "most learnt" from among our esteemed living Maraji', may Allah prolong their lives. 

On the topic of selecting a Marja', it is best that you refer to the rulings and following the correct criteria for your selection. It is not a difficult process, and it should not take a lot of your time. 

With prayers for your success. 

62386

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 day ago

Bismihi ta'ala

As you know, when it comes to an animal that we as Muslims are not allowed to eat, its urine and faeces are najis

If such an animal was to swallow something solid, like a coin, and then it comes out with the animal's waste, the only thing that we would need to do is wash it to make the coin tahir.

The problem with this coffee been is that although it is 'solid', but when it is in the digestive system of this animal, the Asian palm civet, there is a change in the structure and affect in the flavour of the coffee bean. 

The coffee bean before being digested is different to after it has been defacated by the animal.

This is why some of our esteeemed Fuqaha, like Ayatullah al-Udhma Seyid al-Sistani consider it to be haram. 

Please refer to the fatwa of your own Marja' Taqleed. 

And Allah knows best. 

62210

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 6 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

The answer to this important question is absolutely yes. One will certainly be rewarded for suppressing their lustful desires and not acting upon them in the haram way. We have ahadith that say any time a person comes across a lustful situation, and turns their head to the skies, and asks Allah ta'ala for strength, the Almighty will compensate them with abundant reward. 

Something to always keep in mind when we are doing Jihad al-Nafs is to avoid situations that would tempt us. This also means marriage becomes even more important for such a person.

With prayers for your success. 

62088

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 6 days ago

Bismihi ta'ala

Please visit my Youtube channel, and you will see a variety of video tutorials on wudhu, ghusl, prayer, and so on:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLHj5BjXrLabhA_vdCwAPtN9dFKRPuntX-

With prayers for your success. 

61895

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala

In this particular stage that you are in, while becoming acquainted with a religion, it is fundamentally important for you to put all your effort  into understanding the foundations of the religion. While searching into Islam, it is not the branches or laws that you should be focusing on, but rather the very issues that define Islam. 

What defines Islam is Monothesim, and that the foundation of Islam is a reason-based religion that accommodates to our intellectual and rational nature as human beings. 

As for the jurisprudential matters, they are secondary matters that you look into not only through "reason", but through devotion. As you might know, Islam means to "submit" to the will and command of Almighty God, as a devout worshipper. 

In the realm of Shari'ah and Islamic jurisprudence and law, there are many discussions that might exhaust you at this particular time. 

However, that being said, yes, there are differences of jurispudential laws between the Sunni School of Thought and the Shia School of Thought. Furthermore, there is a difference within these schools themselves. 

So, if you agree with the Sunni view on marriage, you must look into which school that is. And what is wrong with temporary marriage contracts? Should you read about it, you will understand that there are many substantial arguments that proof Mut'ah existed as a law during the time of the Prophet of Islam (s.a.w.). 

In Sunni fiqh, due to the refusal of acknowledging this, they had to come up with alternatives that do not have a Shar'i basis, like misyar, and a few others. 

Someone does not have to practice temporary marriage, and in reality most Shi'a do not. But, like many other laws, it is there to serve a purpose for those who require it. 

As for Khums, again, what would your understanding of Khums be, so much that you "strongly disagree with it"? 

If you look at religions, and sects, you will see that you are forced to give a percentage of your yearly wages and income. In Sunnism, you must give from your Zakat. 

In Shi'ah law, you spend as you wish, and do as you wish, and IF you have some left over money at the end of your year, and you've placed that for savings, then you give 20% of that, not to the rich, but to support and help the Islamic community you live in. 

I think this is something honourable and something we are proud of. 

My advice, besides focusing on the foundations of Islam, is to stay away from being negatively influenced by bad propaganda, and look into these affairs from all angles, trying to find reliable sources as well.

With prayers for your success. 

61558

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'ala

I would like to just share one beautiful hadith we have that speaks about the abundant reward of a blind person. In our Islamic traditions and culture, we do not see the word a'maa, or blind being used to describe a person who does not have the sense of sight. In honouring and empowering them, more positive words are used, like baseer, makfuf, and so on, with each one having a great meaning. 

This hadith is from Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (a.s.):

 مَنْ لَقِيَ اَللَّهَ مَكْفُوفاً مُحْتَسِباً مُوَالِياً لآِلِ مُحَمَّدٍ عَلَيْهِمُ السَّلاَمُ لَقِيَ اَللَّهَ عَزَّ وَ جَلَّ وَ لاَ حِسَابَ عَلَيْهِ

Whoever meets Allah, being blind, but tolerating it with patience, and devoted to the Progeny of Muhammad (a.s.), he/she will be meeting Almighty God and will not be judged for anything. 

Yes, we understand that this does not mean a blind person man sin as he/she wishes, but it means that the Almighty has assured the believer who is deprived of something in this world, that they will be compensated and rewarded for it in this world, in other things, and also in the Hereafter.

With prayers for your success.

53383

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 1 week ago

Bismihi ta'aa

I would say we cannot give a yes, or no answer to this question, as there are many issues to take in mind. 

Yes, from a Fiqhi perspective, there is no problem in itself with women watching men "playing sports." There would be a problem if the men were topless, for example. There is also no shar'i requirement that every woman who attends, Muslim or not, must observe Hijab. Unless of course it is an Islamic country where Islamic dresscode is applied to all in public. 

An issue that we need to look into is whether the atmosphere is appropriate for young boys, or girls, or even women. Will there be excessive swearing and offensive language thrown around. Is the mixing between genders so much that it would be an inappropriate environment for a mu'min/mu'minah to be in. 

Is it culturally accepted, for women to go to such a tournament, or will it be taken as something bad, or she will be criticised, or spoken ill about. 

It is clear that we are influenced and dragged into today's sports culture, and we might have an interest in following some sports group, or be serious fans. At the same time, we have religious and moral principles that we must never abandon.

This applies to both genders as well. Our level of modesty, evaluating where we should go and where we should not go, looking into the shar'i, social and cultural aspects of what we participate in, and other important factors. 

More can be said about this, but in general the mukallaf must try to look at this from different angles, and like everything else be as cautious as possible, choosing what would bring him/her closer to Allah ta'ala.

With prayers for your success.

61105

Zaid Alsalami, Shaykh Dr Zaid Alsalami is an Iraqi born scholar, raised in Australia. He obtained a BA from Al-Mustafa University, Qom, and an MA from the Islamic College in London. He also obtained a PhD from... Answered 2 weeks ago

Assalam alaikum, 

A few years ago I wrote a short piece on this important topic, which would hopefully be useful for you to read:

https://facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1224067687609422&id=100000186070548&set=a.116154988400703 

With prayers for your success.